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Skin tight space suits ?



 
 
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Old October 24th 17, 06:57 AM posted to sci.space.policy
William Mook[_2_]
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Default Skin tight space suits ?


https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/c...9680002042.pdf

https://www.researchgate.net/publica...RATION_OF_MARS

https://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/90602

https://www.researchgate.net/publica...ace_suit_glove

https://www.lpi.usra.edu/publication...1106/ucb01.pdf

http://issyroo.org/SilsuitG2TechECSafe.pdf

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc...=rep1&type=pdf

* * *

A more advanced concept is one where active machine elements SELF ASSEMBLE into a suit on demand. This is a concept known as UTILITY FOG.

https://www.scribd.com/presentation/...39/Utility-Fog

http://www.zyvex.com/nanotech/NASAapplications.html

Here, a door through a transparent dome on Mars responds by enveloping a person as they walk through it, and maintains stable environmental conditions seamlessly. Likewise, dissolve as they enter the dome from outside - taking all the dirt and debris with it.


On Saturday, July 15, 2017 at 5:01:30 PM UTC+12, JF Mezei wrote:
This is more to understand things.

Forgetting for a second temperature and radiation.

If astronauts wore some airtight lycra suit that was right up against
the skin (so no air between skin and suit), would the skin be protected
from vacuum? Would tension of suit against skin be enough to make skin
think it wasn't in vacuum?

(I thinking about imcreasing mobility without having to fight a 5 PSI
balloon around your body).

(Obviously, the helmet would be pressurized).


(Yeah, they would need capilaries to draw sweat from skin, and
cooling/warming tubes for temperature control).

If there is no air gap between skin and suit, would simple reflective
coating do the trick to reflect heat at both sides. (body heat back, and
reflecting sun). (aka: like a thermos).

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