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Discovery of 50km cave raises hopes for human colonisation of moon



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 20th 17, 07:28 AM posted to sci.space.policy
[email protected]
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Posts: 622
Default Discovery of 50km cave raises hopes for human colonisation of moon

"Using a radar sounder system that can examine underground structures, the orbiter
initially found an opening 50 metres wide and 50 metres deep, prompting
speculation that there could be a larger hollow.

This week scientists at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Jaxa) confirmed
the presence of a cave after examining the hole using radio waves.

The chasm, 50km (31 miles) long and 100 metres wide, appears to be structurally
sound and its rocks may contain ice or water deposits that could be turned into
fuel, according to data sent back by the orbiter, nicknamed Kaguya after the moon
princess in a Japanese fairytale."

See:

https://www.theguardian.com/science/...sation-of-moon

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  #2  
Old October 20th 17, 02:41 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Bob Haller
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Posts: 3,197
Default Discovery of 50km cave raises hopes for human colonisation of moon

On Friday, October 20, 2017 at 2:29:00 AM UTC-4, wrote:
"Using a radar sounder system that can examine underground structures, the orbiter
initially found an opening 50 metres wide and 50 metres deep, prompting
speculation that there could be a larger hollow.

This week scientists at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Jaxa) confirmed
the presence of a cave after examining the hole using radio waves.

The chasm, 50km (31 miles) long and 100 metres wide, appears to be structurally
sound and its rocks may contain ice or water deposits that could be turned into
fuel, according to data sent back by the orbiter, nicknamed Kaguya after the moon
princess in a Japanese fairytale."

See:

https://www.theguardian.com/science/...sation-of-moon



should send a rover to check it out
  #3  
Old October 20th 17, 05:09 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Fred J. McCall[_3_]
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Posts: 9,758
Default Discovery of 50km cave raises hopes for human colonisation of moon

bob haller wrote:

On Friday, October 20, 2017 at 2:29:00 AM UTC-4, wrote:
"Using a radar sounder system that can examine underground structures, the orbiter
initially found an opening 50 metres wide and 50 metres deep, prompting
speculation that there could be a larger hollow.

This week scientists at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Jaxa) confirmed
the presence of a cave after examining the hole using radio waves.

The chasm, 50km (31 miles) long and 100 metres wide, appears to be structurally
sound and its rocks may contain ice or water deposits that could be turned into
fuel, according to data sent back by the orbiter, nicknamed Kaguya after the moon
princess in a Japanese fairytale."

See:

https://www.theguardian.com/science/...sation-of-moon


should send a rover to check it out


Rovers can't do spelunking. You'd have to send people.


--
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable
man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore,
all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
--George Bernard Shaw
  #4  
Old October 21st 17, 04:42 AM posted to sci.space.policy
William Elliot[_4_]
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Posts: 61
Default Discovery of 50km cave raises hopes for human colonisation ofmoon

On Fri, 20 Oct 2017, Fred J. McCall wrote:

The chasm, 50km (31 miles) long and 100 metres wide, appears to be structurally
sound and its rocks may contain ice or water deposits that could be turned into
fuel, according to data sent back by the orbiter, nicknamed Kaguya after the moon
princess in a Japanese fairytale."

See:
https://www.theguardian.com/science/...sation-of-moon


should send a rover to check it out

Rovers can't do spelunking. You'd have to send people.


Why? A rover could go in, take a look around and come back to tell us
what it saw.

  #5  
Old October 21st 17, 03:43 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Fred J. McCall[_3_]
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Posts: 9,758
Default Discovery of 50km cave raises hopes for human colonisation of moon

William Elliot wrote:

On Fri, 20 Oct 2017, Fred J. McCall wrote:

The chasm, 50km (31 miles) long and 100 metres wide, appears to be structurally
sound and its rocks may contain ice or water deposits that could be turned into
fuel, according to data sent back by the orbiter, nicknamed Kaguya after the moon
princess in a Japanese fairytale."

See:
https://www.theguardian.com/science/...sation-of-moon

should send a rover to check it out

Rovers can't do spelunking. You'd have to send people.


Why? A rover could go in, take a look around and come back to tell us
what it saw.


Rovers are only good on relatively flat ground and even there they
travel slowly to avoid accidents. No way one can go spelunking.


--
"Some people get lost in thought because it's such unfamiliar
territory."
--G. Behn
  #6  
Old October 22nd 17, 04:00 AM posted to sci.space.policy
William Elliot[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default Discovery of 50km cave raises hopes for human colonisation ofmoon

On Sat, 21 Oct 2017, Fred J. McCall wrote:
William Elliot wrote:
On Fri, 20 Oct 2017, Fred J. McCall wrote:

The chasm, 50km (31 miles) long and 100 metres wide, appears to be structurally
sound and its rocks may contain ice or water deposits that could be turned into
fuel, according to data sent back by the orbiter, nicknamed Kaguya after the moon
princess in a Japanese fairytale."

See:
https://www.theguardian.com/science/...sation-of-moon

should send a rover to check it out
Rovers can't do spelunking. You'd have to send people.


Why? A rover could go in, take a look around and come back to tell us
what it saw.


Rovers are only good on relatively flat ground and even there they
travel slowly to avoid accidents. No way one can go spelunking.


There are robots that walk into volcano craters.
Use one of those.
  #7  
Old October 22nd 17, 09:14 AM posted to sci.space.policy
[email protected]
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Posts: 622
Default Discovery of 50km cave raises hopes for human colonisation of moon

Moon colonization – many lava tube caves, water and high amounts of titanium:

"The moon has many hundreds of large lava tube caves. The Lunar Reconnaissance
Orbiter has now imaged over 200 pits that show the signature of being skylights
into subsurface voids or caverns, ranging in diameter from about 16 feet (5
meters) to more than 2,950 feet (900 meters), although some of these are likely to
be post-flow features rather than volcanic skylights."

See:

https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2017/1...-titanium.html

  #8  
Old October 22nd 17, 09:20 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Fred J. McCall[_3_]
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Posts: 9,758
Default Discovery of 50km cave raises hopes for human colonisation of moon

William Elliot wrote:

On Sat, 21 Oct 2017, Fred J. McCall wrote:
William Elliot wrote:
On Fri, 20 Oct 2017, Fred J. McCall wrote:

The chasm, 50km (31 miles) long and 100 metres wide, appears to be structurally
sound and its rocks may contain ice or water deposits that could be turned into
fuel, according to data sent back by the orbiter, nicknamed Kaguya after the moon
princess in a Japanese fairytale."

See:
https://www.theguardian.com/science/...sation-of-moon

should send a rover to check it out
Rovers can't do spelunking. You'd have to send people.

Why? A rover could go in, take a look around and come back to tell us
what it saw.


Rovers are only good on relatively flat ground and even there they
travel slowly to avoid accidents. No way one can go spelunking.


There are robots that walk into volcano craters.
Use one of those.


And send a human with it? Communication lag between your volcano
robot and the operator is?


--
"Some people get lost in thought because it's such unfamiliar
territory."
--G. Behn
  #9  
Old October 23rd 17, 01:55 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Greg \(Strider\) Moore
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Posts: 624
Default Discovery of 50km cave raises hopes for human colonisation of moon

"William Elliot" wrote in message
x.com...

On Fri, 20 Oct 2017, Fred J. McCall wrote:

The chasm, 50km (31 miles) long and 100 metres wide, appears to be
structurally
sound and its rocks may contain ice or water deposits that co uld be
turned into
fuel, according to data sent back by the orbiter, nicknamed Kaguya
after the moon
princess in a Japanese fairytale."

See:
https://www.theguardian.com/science/...sation-of-moon

should send a rover to check it out

Rovers can't do spelunking. You'd have to send people.


Why? A rover could go in, take a look around and come back to tell us
what it saw.


And how do you navigate? Radio isn't going to work well, and while an
autonomous rover sounds like a good idea, they work best when we already
know the terrain.
In theory a lava tube should be relatively smooth on the inside except for
chunks that have fallen from the ceiling, there's no guarantee what we know
about lava tubes here on Earth cleanly translates to how they'd form on the
Moon, or how this particular one would form.

So, you really want to have someone on site. And once you do, you might as
well just use them to explore the tube.

And trust me, there's no shortage of cavers here on Earth that would be
willing to check out a lunar lava tube.

I'm probably a bit too old to go, but you know, I've got some time to spare
if NASA is willing to provide transportation.



--
Greg D. Moore http://greenmountainsoftware.wordpress.com/
CEO QuiCR: Quick, Crowdsourced Responses. http://www.quicr.net
IT Disaster Response -
https://www.amazon.com/Disaster-Resp...dp/1484221834/

  #10  
Old October 23rd 17, 03:57 AM posted to sci.space.policy
William Elliot[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default Discovery of 50km cave raises hopes for human colonisation ofmoon

On Sun, 22 Oct 2017, Fred J. McCall wrote:
William Elliot wrote:

The chasm, 50km (31 miles) long and 100 metres wide, appears to be structurally
sound and its rocks may contain ice or water deposits that could be turned into
fuel, according to data sent back by the orbiter, nicknamed Kaguya after the moon
princess in a Japanese fairytale."
https://www.theguardian.com/science/...sation-of-moon

should send a rover to check it out
Rovers can't do spelunking. You'd have to send people.

Why? A rover could go in, take a look around and come back to tell us
what it saw.

Rovers are only good on relatively flat ground and even there they
travel slowly to avoid accidents. No way one can go spelunking.


There are robots that walk into volcano craters.
Use one of those.


And send a human with it? Communication lag between your volcano
robot and the operator is?


A few seconds. No big deal like the 8 hrs to Pluto.
The robot could use automonous driving like rovers do.
Simple way is to take a look, go a bit, take another look.
Quick reactions aren't required of a plodder.

 




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