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ASTRO: UGC 5101 One super strange galaxy Arp missed



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 6th 12, 05:42 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Rick Johnson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,085
Default ASTRO: UGC 5101 One super strange galaxy Arp missed

UGC 5101 is another one Arp overlooked. It has what he'd call a Jet
going to the west. I don't know what he'd call the plume that arcs
partly around the galaxy and seems unrelated to the "jet". It is quite
likely both features are the result of a merger or mergers in the past.
Some papers say one merger, others two. I'd favor the idea it has
merged with two each creating its own plume as it was ripped apart. It
is in Ursa major about 8 degrees south of M81 and 540 million
light-years away.

I used one of my very rare nights of seeing sufficient to work at 0.5'
per pixel in order to get as much detail in this galaxy as possible.
The posted image however has been reduced to 0.67" per pixel as the
night just wasn't as good as I'd hoped. Also to keep bandwidth within
reason it has been cropped considerably to about 24.7 minutes wide
minutes from the original 33.7 minutes. Height was left at my normal
22.5 minutes.

The annotated image has 12 probable quasars with a half dozen more
cropped out. Arp believed (still does from reports I've gotten) that
quasars were not distant objects like their redshift indicated but were
ejected from active galaxies like UGC 5101. He'd have loved all the
quasars around it if he had known at the time. His idea was the
redshift increased with time from their ejection from the galaxy. So
those nearby would have low redshifts while those further away higher
redshifts. He had to invent strange physics to make this work. His
fixation on the near crackpot physics got him kicked off the 200" scope.
Those marked UvES are Ultraviolet Excess Objects not yet confirmed as
quasars but what else could have such a redshift and still be bright
enough to pick up in a 14" scope? One is a strange X-ray object. It is
toward the west side of the image and fully labeled so you can look it
up at NED if you wish. It's position is vague. The only object within
its rather generous error circle that appears to be the object is the
one I marked. In the Sloan image it is made up of several different
bright colors, very strange indeed. Only one other object was within
the error circle and it, too faint for my system, looked like an
ordinary star in the Sloan image. Due to the uncertainty it carries a
question mark label.

The other questionable object is at the top of the image left of center.
There is an odd blue galaxy made up of two condensations. One to the
north being brighter than the one to the south. There's nearly a hole
between them creating a near ring like structure. I was wondering what
NED would have on it. Nothing it turned out. It does show an object at
about the position of the "hole" but lists it as 21st magnitude and is
listed as a near point source. Obviously the blue object is far
brighter than that and far larger in angular size. Even the Sloan image
showed no point source at the listed position. It remains an unknown.

The small cropped image is full size, 0.5" per pixel. The other two at
the reduced 0.67" per pixel.

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x20'x1, RGB=2x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

Rick
--
Prefix is correct. Domain is arvig dot net


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Name:	UGC5101L4X20X1RGB2X10R-67ID.JPG
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  #2  
Old July 22nd 12, 02:27 AM
Carolina Carolina is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Johnson[_2_] View Post
UGC 5101 is another one Arp overlooked. It has what he'd call a Jet
going to the west. I don't know what he'd call the plume that arcs
partly around the galaxy and seems unrelated to the "jet". It is quite
likely both features are the result of a merger or mergers in the past.
Some papers say one merger, others two. I'd favor the idea it has
merged with two each creating its own plume as it was ripped apart. It
is in Ursa major about 8 degrees south of M81 and 540 million
light-years away.

I used one of my very rare nights of seeing sufficient to work at 0.5'
per pixel in order to get as much detail in this galaxy as possible.
The posted image however has been reduced to 0.67" per pixel as the
night just wasn't as good as I'd hoped. Also to keep bandwidth within
reason it has been cropped considerably to about 24.7 minutes wide
minutes from the original 33.7 minutes. Height was left at my normal
22.5 minutes.

The annotated image has 12 probable quasars with a half dozen more
cropped out. Arp believed (still does from reports I've gotten) that
quasars were not distant objects like their redshift indicated but were
ejected from active galaxies like UGC 5101. He'd have loved all the
quasars around it if he had known at the time. His idea was the
redshift increased with time from their ejection from the galaxy. So
those nearby would have low redshifts while those further away higher
redshifts. He had to invent strange physics to make this work. His
fixation on the near crackpot physics got him kicked off the 200" scope.
Those marked UvES are Ultraviolet Excess Objects not yet confirmed as
quasars but what else could have such a redshift and still be bright
enough to pick up in a 14" scope? One is a strange X-ray object. It is
toward the west side of the image and fully labeled so you can look it
up at NED if you wish. It's position is vague. The only object within
its rather generous error circle that appears to be the object is the
one I marked. In the Sloan image it is made up of several different
bright colors, very strange indeed. Only one other object was within
the error circle and it, too faint for my system, looked like an
ordinary star in the Sloan image. Due to the uncertainty it carries a
question mark label.

The other questionable object is at the top of the image left of center.
There is an odd blue galaxy made up of two condensations. One to the
north being brighter than the one to the south. There's nearly a hole
between them creating a near ring like structure. I was wondering what
NED would have on it. Nothing it turned out. It does show an object at
about the position of the "hole" but lists it as 21st magnitude and is
listed as a near point source. Obviously the blue object is far
brighter than that and far larger in angular size. Even the Sloan image
showed no point source at the listed position. It remains an unknown.

The small cropped image is full size, 0.5" per pixel. The other two at
the reduced 0.67" per pixel.

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x20'x1, RGB=2x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

Rick
--
Prefix is correct. Domain is arvig dot net
Nossa Senhora! very beautiful!
  #3  
Old July 25th 12, 05:42 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Rick Johnson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,085
Default ASTRO: UGC 5101 One super strange galaxy Arp missed

On 7/21/2012 8:27 PM, Carolina wrote:
'Rick Johnson[_2_ Wrote:
;1216563']UGC 5101 is another one Arp overlooked. It has what he'd call
a Jet
going to the west. I don't know what he'd call the plume that arcs
partly around the galaxy and seems unrelated to the "jet". It is quite

likely both features are the result of a merger or mergers in the past.

Some papers say one merger, others two. I'd favor the idea it has
merged with two each creating its own plume as it was ripped apart. It

is in Ursa major about 8 degrees south of M81 and 540 million
light-years away.

I used one of my very rare nights of seeing sufficient to work at 0.5'
per pixel in order to get as much detail in this galaxy as possible.
The posted image however has been reduced to 0.67" per pixel as the
night just wasn't as good as I'd hoped. Also to keep bandwidth within
reason it has been cropped considerably to about 24.7 minutes wide
minutes from the original 33.7 minutes. Height was left at my normal
22.5 minutes.

The annotated image has 12 probable quasars with a half dozen more
cropped out. Arp believed (still does from reports I've gotten) that
quasars were not distant objects like their redshift indicated but were

ejected from active galaxies like UGC 5101. He'd have loved all the
quasars around it if he had known at the time. His idea was the
redshift increased with time from their ejection from the galaxy. So
those nearby would have low redshifts while those further away higher
redshifts. He had to invent strange physics to make this work. His
fixation on the near crackpot physics got him kicked off the 200" scope.

Those marked UvES are Ultraviolet Excess Objects not yet confirmed as

quasars but what else could have such a redshift and still be bright
enough to pick up in a 14" scope? One is a strange X-ray object. It is

toward the west side of the image and fully labeled so you can look it
up at NED if you wish. It's position is vague. The only object within

its rather generous error circle that appears to be the object is the
one I marked. In the Sloan image it is made up of several different
bright colors, very strange indeed. Only one other object was within
the error circle and it, too faint for my system, looked like an
ordinary star in the Sloan image. Due to the uncertainty it carries a
question mark label.

The other questionable object is at the top of the image left of center.

There is an odd blue galaxy made up of two condensations. One to the

north being brighter than the one to the south. There's nearly a hole
between them creating a near ring like structure. I was wondering what

NED would have on it. Nothing it turned out. It does show an object at

about the position of the "hole" but lists it as 21st magnitude and is
listed as a near point source. Obviously the blue object is far
brighter than that and far larger in angular size. Even the Sloan image

showed no point source at the listed position. It remains an unknown.

The small cropped image is full size, 0.5" per pixel. The other two at

the reduced 0.67" per pixel.

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x20'x1, RGB=2x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

Rick
--
Prefix is correct. Domain is arvig dot net

Nossa Senhora! very beautiful!


Thanks. It still isn't up to what my system can do on a good night but
will have to do for now.

Rick


--
Prefix is correct. Domain is arvig dot net
 




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