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ASTRO: Baker's Dozen. Spiking a Galaxy, Arp 323



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 21st 10, 06:19 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Rick Johnson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,085
Default ASTRO: Baker's Dozen. Spiking a Galaxy, Arp 323

This one could go by all of these titles.

Arp 323 is also known as Hickson 98 is a galaxy group in western Pisces
about 345 million light years. The bright pair is NGC 7783. Some
catalogs show them as 7783 and 7783A while others say 7783A and 7783B or
like NED NGC 7783 NED 01 and NGC 7783 NED 02. All left to right. In
the MCG catalog they are MCG +0-60-58 and MCG +0-60-59. Though the
Kanipe-Webb book shows the western one as 7783 and the eastern as MCG
+0-69-59. All very confusing. In the Hickson catalog they are 98A and
98B respectively. The galaxy to the north is MCG +0-60-60 or Hickson
98D with the southern one below a field star being NGC 7783C or Hickson
98C. I'll use Hickson letters as they are something most agree on.

Hickson 98A is listed by NED as being SB0. 98B is S0 with 98C being
just E and 98D as Sc or S0^+?. This latter galaxy isn't a true member
of the group it seems as its red shift puts it at nearly twice the
distance of A and B at 650 million light years. C's red shift shows 354
million light years which is close enough to be a true member of the
group. There's a 5th galaxy in Arp's image, just southwest of C. It is
SDSS J235412.56+002113.3 with no redshift or classification data given.
Is it a member of the group? Maybe, as a similar galaxy that
apparently is a member is seen to the upper right of the bright star
above Arp 323. It is SDSS J235402.45+002723.7 at 360 million light
years. See the annotated image for it and other objects in the field,
especially asteroids. Galaxies are noted by G and their distance in
billions of light years, quasars by Q followed by their distance also in
billions of light years. The label is just to the right of the object
unless I had to move it because of problems. In that case I have drawn
a line to the object. Two lines denoting the faint asteroid's start and
stop points. All were moving east to west, left to right.

Note the long tidal tail descending to the southeast of Hickson 98B. It
isn't mentioned by Arp nor did I see it on any image of this group I saw
on the net. I've not done an exhaustive search but so far I find no
mention of this "spike" anyplace I've looked. It barely shows in the
POSS 2 plates if you enhance the heck out of the FITS version. It shows
better on the Sloan image. After despiking Arp 192 have I now spiked
Arp 323! It came as a complete surprise to me when I was processing the
image. I came close to processing it out as a ghost image of some sort
but it is real. My attempts to bring it out likely have it more sharply
defined than it really is. Yet another to be retaken with far more
imaging time in a few months.

The reddish oblong blur coming up from the bottom left of center is due
to a 5th magnitude M5 star a bit out of the field of view. Enhancing
the tidal plume also enhanced it quite a bit.

This image sets my personal record for the number seen in one image. I
found 12 down to magnitude 20.3. You'll need a monitor that can see
deep into the black to find them all. In order of brightness they a

Number Designation Magnitude
(47428) 1999 XK172 16.3
(105177) 2000 OA27 17.4
(58662) 1997 XJ2 17.6
2009 QR51 19.2
(60164) 1999 UF28 19.5
(125650) 2001 XV68 19.5
(182255) 2001 FM108 19.5
2005 SL88 19.5
2009 QJ58 19.8
2007 DE113 20.0
2006 UR118 20.2
2005 UK299 20.3

There appears to be a 13th asteroid, it is unknown to the Minor Planet
Center. Unfortunately this was taken in September,2009 and I only found
it when I first looked at the Luminance data in May, 2010. So it was
impossible to follow up on it. It is number 7 that I've found too late
for follow-up. I had to go back and count them as I had been just
guessing before. I've marked it with a question mark on the annotated
image.

Magnitudes are estimates by the Minor Planet Center and may vary
slightly from what they appear to be in my image. Color may be involved
as my chip is blue sensitive so those that are red will appear dimmer
than they really are in the luminosity image.

The SDSS image is attached with the tail showing faintly after I
enhanced the image more than they did. I can't imagine this is a
reflection of some sort. Though their image has its share of nasty
reflections! For both of us to have the same reflection is too much to
swallow. I've attached the SDSS image as well as mine and the annotated
image.

Arp's image:
http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/level...ig_arp323.jpeg

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x10' RGB=2x10'x3, STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

Rick
--
Correct domain name is arvig and it is net not com. Prefix is correct.
Third character is a zero rather than a capital "Oh".

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ARP323L4X10RGB2X10X3R1.jpg
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Size:	243.7 KB
ID:	3039  Click image for larger version

Name:	ARP323L4X10RGB2X10X3R1CROP.jpg
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ID:	3040  Click image for larger version

Name:	ARP323L4X10RGB2X10X3-ID.jpg
Views:	214
Size:	126.1 KB
ID:	3041  Click image for larger version

Name:	SDSS-Arp323.jpg
Views:	202
Size:	103.5 KB
ID:	3042  
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  #2  
Old July 21st 10, 09:13 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Rick Johnson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,085
Default ASTRO: Baker's Dozen. Spiking a Galaxy, Arp 323

Oops, Attached the wrong cropped image. Meant to attach a 2x version.
Trying again.

Rick
--
Correct domain name is arvig and it is net not com. Prefix is correct.
Third character is a zero rather than a capital "Oh".

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ARP323L4X10RGB2X10X3R1CROP2x.jpg
Views:	150
Size:	110.8 KB
ID:	3043  
  #3  
Old July 23rd 10, 11:13 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Glen Youman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 177
Default ASTRO: Baker's Dozen. Spiking a Galaxy, Arp 323

I know I've imaged that galaxy pair but can't find the image.

Interesting galaxy - good image.

On Wed, 21 Jul 2010 00:19:58 -0500, Rick Johnson
wrote:

This one could go by all of these titles.

Arp 323 is also known as Hickson 98 is a galaxy group in western Pisces
about 345 million light years. The bright pair is NGC 7783. Some
catalogs show them as 7783 and 7783A while others say 7783A and 7783B or
like NED NGC 7783 NED 01 and NGC 7783 NED 02. All left to right. In
the MCG catalog they are MCG +0-60-58 and MCG +0-60-59. Though the
Kanipe-Webb book shows the western one as 7783 and the eastern as MCG
+0-69-59. All very confusing. In the Hickson catalog they are 98A and
98B respectively. The galaxy to the north is MCG +0-60-60 or Hickson
98D with the southern one below a field star being NGC 7783C or Hickson
98C. I'll use Hickson letters as they are something most agree on.

Hickson 98A is listed by NED as being SB0. 98B is S0 with 98C being
just E and 98D as Sc or S0^+?. This latter galaxy isn't a true member
of the group it seems as its red shift puts it at nearly twice the
distance of A and B at 650 million light years. C's red shift shows 354
million light years which is close enough to be a true member of the
group. There's a 5th galaxy in Arp's image, just southwest of C. It is
SDSS J235412.56+002113.3 with no redshift or classification data given.
Is it a member of the group? Maybe, as a similar galaxy that
apparently is a member is seen to the upper right of the bright star
above Arp 323. It is SDSS J235402.45+002723.7 at 360 million light
years. See the annotated image for it and other objects in the field,
especially asteroids. Galaxies are noted by G and their distance in
billions of light years, quasars by Q followed by their distance also in
billions of light years. The label is just to the right of the object
unless I had to move it because of problems. In that case I have drawn
a line to the object. Two lines denoting the faint asteroid's start and
stop points. All were moving east to west, left to right.

Note the long tidal tail descending to the southeast of Hickson 98B. It
isn't mentioned by Arp nor did I see it on any image of this group I saw
on the net. I've not done an exhaustive search but so far I find no
mention of this "spike" anyplace I've looked. It barely shows in the
POSS 2 plates if you enhance the heck out of the FITS version. It shows
better on the Sloan image. After despiking Arp 192 have I now spiked
Arp 323! It came as a complete surprise to me when I was processing the
image. I came close to processing it out as a ghost image of some sort
but it is real. My attempts to bring it out likely have it more sharply
defined than it really is. Yet another to be retaken with far more
imaging time in a few months.

The reddish oblong blur coming up from the bottom left of center is due
to a 5th magnitude M5 star a bit out of the field of view. Enhancing
the tidal plume also enhanced it quite a bit.

This image sets my personal record for the number seen in one image. I
found 12 down to magnitude 20.3. You'll need a monitor that can see
deep into the black to find them all. In order of brightness they a

Number Designation Magnitude
(47428) 1999 XK172 16.3
(105177) 2000 OA27 17.4
(58662) 1997 XJ2 17.6
2009 QR51 19.2
(60164) 1999 UF28 19.5
(125650) 2001 XV68 19.5
(182255) 2001 FM108 19.5
2005 SL88 19.5
2009 QJ58 19.8
2007 DE113 20.0
2006 UR118 20.2
2005 UK299 20.3

There appears to be a 13th asteroid, it is unknown to the Minor Planet
Center. Unfortunately this was taken in September,2009 and I only found
it when I first looked at the Luminance data in May, 2010. So it was
impossible to follow up on it. It is number 7 that I've found too late
for follow-up. I had to go back and count them as I had been just
guessing before. I've marked it with a question mark on the annotated
image.

Magnitudes are estimates by the Minor Planet Center and may vary
slightly from what they appear to be in my image. Color may be involved
as my chip is blue sensitive so those that are red will appear dimmer
than they really are in the luminosity image.

The SDSS image is attached with the tail showing faintly after I
enhanced the image more than they did. I can't imagine this is a
reflection of some sort. Though their image has its share of nasty
reflections! For both of us to have the same reflection is too much to
swallow. I've attached the SDSS image as well as mine and the annotated
image.

Arp's image:
http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/level...ig_arp323.jpeg

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x10' RGB=2x10'x3, STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

Rick

  #4  
Old July 27th 10, 10:19 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Stefan Lilge
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,269
Default ASTRO: Baker's Dozen. Spiking a Galaxy, Arp 323

Rick,

nice surprise to find a "new" tidal tail. This one is faint for sure.

Stefan

"Rick Johnson" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
. com...
This one could go by all of these titles.

Arp 323 is also known as Hickson 98 is a galaxy group in western Pisces
about 345 million light years. The bright pair is NGC 7783. Some
catalogs show them as 7783 and 7783A while others say 7783A and 7783B or
like NED NGC 7783 NED 01 and NGC 7783 NED 02. All left to right. In
the MCG catalog they are MCG +0-60-58 and MCG +0-60-59. Though the
Kanipe-Webb book shows the western one as 7783 and the eastern as MCG
+0-69-59. All very confusing. In the Hickson catalog they are 98A and
98B respectively. The galaxy to the north is MCG +0-60-60 or Hickson
98D with the southern one below a field star being NGC 7783C or Hickson
98C. I'll use Hickson letters as they are something most agree on.

Hickson 98A is listed by NED as being SB0. 98B is S0 with 98C being
just E and 98D as Sc or S0^+?. This latter galaxy isn't a true member
of the group it seems as its red shift puts it at nearly twice the
distance of A and B at 650 million light years. C's red shift shows 354
million light years which is close enough to be a true member of the
group. There's a 5th galaxy in Arp's image, just southwest of C. It is
SDSS J235412.56+002113.3 with no redshift or classification data given.
Is it a member of the group? Maybe, as a similar galaxy that
apparently is a member is seen to the upper right of the bright star
above Arp 323. It is SDSS J235402.45+002723.7 at 360 million light
years. See the annotated image for it and other objects in the field,
especially asteroids. Galaxies are noted by G and their distance in
billions of light years, quasars by Q followed by their distance also in
billions of light years. The label is just to the right of the object
unless I had to move it because of problems. In that case I have drawn
a line to the object. Two lines denoting the faint asteroid's start and
stop points. All were moving east to west, left to right.

Note the long tidal tail descending to the southeast of Hickson 98B. It
isn't mentioned by Arp nor did I see it on any image of this group I saw
on the net. I've not done an exhaustive search but so far I find no
mention of this "spike" anyplace I've looked. It barely shows in the
POSS 2 plates if you enhance the heck out of the FITS version. It shows
better on the Sloan image. After despiking Arp 192 have I now spiked
Arp 323! It came as a complete surprise to me when I was processing the
image. I came close to processing it out as a ghost image of some sort
but it is real. My attempts to bring it out likely have it more sharply
defined than it really is. Yet another to be retaken with far more
imaging time in a few months.

The reddish oblong blur coming up from the bottom left of center is due
to a 5th magnitude M5 star a bit out of the field of view. Enhancing
the tidal plume also enhanced it quite a bit.

This image sets my personal record for the number seen in one image. I
found 12 down to magnitude 20.3. You'll need a monitor that can see
deep into the black to find them all. In order of brightness they a

Number Designation Magnitude
(47428) 1999 XK172 16.3
(105177) 2000 OA27 17.4
(58662) 1997 XJ2 17.6
2009 QR51 19.2
(60164) 1999 UF28 19.5
(125650) 2001 XV68 19.5
(182255) 2001 FM108 19.5
2005 SL88 19.5
2009 QJ58 19.8
2007 DE113 20.0
2006 UR118 20.2
2005 UK299 20.3

There appears to be a 13th asteroid, it is unknown to the Minor Planet
Center. Unfortunately this was taken in September,2009 and I only found
it when I first looked at the Luminance data in May, 2010. So it was
impossible to follow up on it. It is number 7 that I've found too late
for follow-up. I had to go back and count them as I had been just
guessing before. I've marked it with a question mark on the annotated
image.

Magnitudes are estimates by the Minor Planet Center and may vary
slightly from what they appear to be in my image. Color may be involved
as my chip is blue sensitive so those that are red will appear dimmer
than they really are in the luminosity image.

The SDSS image is attached with the tail showing faintly after I
enhanced the image more than they did. I can't imagine this is a
reflection of some sort. Though their image has its share of nasty
reflections! For both of us to have the same reflection is too much to
swallow. I've attached the SDSS image as well as mine and the annotated
image.

Arp's image:
http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/level...ig_arp323.jpeg

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x10' RGB=2x10'x3, STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

Rick
--
Correct domain name is arvig and it is net not com. Prefix is correct.
Third character is a zero rather than a capital "Oh".



 




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