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ASTRO: Arp 303



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 3rd 10, 05:56 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Rick Johnson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,085
Default ASTRO: Arp 303

Temperature here is trying to emulate deep space. It was -36.6C (-34F)
here last night. We may beat that tonight. To think we are closest to
the sun for the year right now! I'm typing this in front of a nice cozy
fireplace what with a full moon and foot of snow on the observatory
roof. Just too cold to clean that off. When we reach 0F I'll consider it.

Arp 303 is classed by Arp under Group Character: Double galaxies. He
apparently made no notes on this one. Thus, other than there being two
galaxies at the same distance, one of which appears a bit distorted I
don't see that it is all that unusual. Many exist that to me are far
more unusual that aren't in the catalog.

The southern, somewhat distorted galaxy, is IC 563. NED classes it
SB(r)ab: pec. It does show a large dark area north of the core and a
tidal arm to the west. The northern galaxy is IC 564 classed by NED as
SA(s)cd? pec. It's peculiarity seems mostly due to a large radio loop.
The pair is located in northwestern Sextans and are about 290 million
light-years distant. According to the SDSS the small blue knot in IC
564 to the southwest, just beyond a redder knot is really another
galaxy, SDSS J094619.84+030406.6. They give no redshift data. I doubt
it could be seen through the disk of IC 564 so is most likely a
foreground object or really what it appears, a star cloud in IC 564. I
vote for the latter as there's yet another such "galaxy" in IC 564 per
the SDSS. It is a more yellow star cloud directly east of the core that
is very small and nearly star-like except for its elongation. Usually
these are noted as PofG by the SDSS indicating they are part of the
galaxy or NED puts in a note to this effect. Neither happened here but
I still am going to vote for them being part of the galaxy, maybe pieces
digested from IC 563 when they were closer.

There are two other galaxies in the image that are at the same distance
as Arp 303. They are close together to the northwest. The further,
bigger and brighter one is IC 561. It is unclassed by NED but looks
like a typical disk galaxy except for the two "holes" to the southeast
and southwest. The other is, of course the smaller spiral like galaxy
to its southeast. It is SDSS J094602.21+030803.5 and is also not
classed by NED. Again the CGCG catalog considers these a pair and
records them as CGCG 035-049.

The large, low surface brightness galaxy toward the southwest corner of
the image is UGC 5224. At only 100 million light-years it isn't related
to Arp 303 but makes a nice addition to the image. It is also cataloged
as CGCG 035-048 which considers it a triple galaxy with the blue and red
galaxies toward its southeastern end. I find no redshift data but
suspect this is just a chance alignment and they really aren't a
physical triplet. To the northeast of the triplet as a nice oval galaxy
with a large orange core surrounded by a slate blue disk. This is SDSS
J094600.84+030141.1. Again I have no redshift data on it. Beside it to
the east is the smaller blue galaxy, SDSS J094602.46+030140.3, at 940
million light-years. Why there's data on the fainter one only I don't
know. Though it is unusual to see a blue galaxy at this distance.

At the top of the image almost directly above Arp 303 is a very red
small galaxy. It is SDSS J094618.88+031417.9 at 1.52 billion
light-years. To its east is what appears to be a group of very distant
galaxies. While I find each listed in the SDSS none carry any distance
data nor do I see a galaxy cluster listed for the area. To the southeast
of SDSS J094618.88+031417.9 is SDSS J094618.88+031417.9. It is listed
as being 930 million light-years distant. Go directly east from this
galaxy some distance and you come to two equally bright blue stars of
15th magnitude. Continue east to the first much fainter orange star.
Go southeast to another slightly fainter orange star. Continuing an
equal distance brings you to a blue star of about 20th magnitude. This
is the most distant object in the image that I'm aware of. It is the
quasar SDSS J094649.38+031152.7 with a redshift of z=2.059650. This
would put it about 10.5 billion light-years distant. The light was
leaving it about the time our galaxy was born and 6 billion years before
our sun was created.

Well left of center and a bit south are two 20th magnitude elliptical
galaxies that seem in the core of a bunch of much smaller and fainter
galaxies. Large galaxies often anchor galaxy clusters. Is that what's
happening here? I see no cluster listed. They are SDSS
J094702.91+030023.8 and SDSS J094704.71+030024.0. Red shift puts them
about 3.6 billion light-years away. None of the smaller, fainter
galaxies in the area have red shift data that I could find.

You might want to double the size of the image to see some of the
details mentioned above.

Arp's image:
http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/level...ig_arp303.jpeg

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x10 RGB-2x10, STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

Rick
--
Correct domain name is arvig and it is net not com. Prefix is correct.
Third character is a zero rather than a capital "Oh".

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  #2  
Old January 12th 10, 09:45 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Stefan Lilge
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,269
Default ASTRO: Arp 303

Excellent image Rick, both detail and colour.
Actually we had unusually cold weather in Berlin for some weeks now, but
that meant something like -16 C, not -36 C.
Our usual winter temperatures are hovering around freezing point, but we
have been constantly under zero degrees for some weeks now (and so much snow
on my rooftop terrace that I couldn't image even if it was to clear up,
which probably won't happen soon).

Stefan

"Rick Johnson" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
. com...
Temperature here is trying to emulate deep space. It was -36.6C (-34F)
here last night. We may beat that tonight. To think we are closest to
the sun for the year right now! I'm typing this in front of a nice cozy
fireplace what with a full moon and foot of snow on the observatory
roof. Just too cold to clean that off. When we reach 0F I'll consider
it.

Arp 303 is classed by Arp under Group Character: Double galaxies. He
apparently made no notes on this one. Thus, other than there being two
galaxies at the same distance, one of which appears a bit distorted I
don't see that it is all that unusual. Many exist that to me are far
more unusual that aren't in the catalog.

The southern, somewhat distorted galaxy, is IC 563. NED classes it
SB(r)ab: pec. It does show a large dark area north of the core and a
tidal arm to the west. The northern galaxy is IC 564 classed by NED as
SA(s)cd? pec. It's peculiarity seems mostly due to a large radio loop.
The pair is located in northwestern Sextans and are about 290 million
light-years distant. According to the SDSS the small blue knot in IC
564 to the southwest, just beyond a redder knot is really another
galaxy, SDSS J094619.84+030406.6. They give no redshift data. I doubt
it could be seen through the disk of IC 564 so is most likely a
foreground object or really what it appears, a star cloud in IC 564. I
vote for the latter as there's yet another such "galaxy" in IC 564 per
the SDSS. It is a more yellow star cloud directly east of the core that
is very small and nearly star-like except for its elongation. Usually
these are noted as PofG by the SDSS indicating they are part of the
galaxy or NED puts in a note to this effect. Neither happened here but
I still am going to vote for them being part of the galaxy, maybe pieces
digested from IC 563 when they were closer.

There are two other galaxies in the image that are at the same distance
as Arp 303. They are close together to the northwest. The further,
bigger and brighter one is IC 561. It is unclassed by NED but looks
like a typical disk galaxy except for the two "holes" to the southeast
and southwest. The other is, of course the smaller spiral like galaxy
to its southeast. It is SDSS J094602.21+030803.5 and is also not
classed by NED. Again the CGCG catalog considers these a pair and
records them as CGCG 035-049.

The large, low surface brightness galaxy toward the southwest corner of
the image is UGC 5224. At only 100 million light-years it isn't related
to Arp 303 but makes a nice addition to the image. It is also cataloged
as CGCG 035-048 which considers it a triple galaxy with the blue and red
galaxies toward its southeastern end. I find no redshift data but
suspect this is just a chance alignment and they really aren't a
physical triplet. To the northeast of the triplet as a nice oval galaxy
with a large orange core surrounded by a slate blue disk. This is SDSS
J094600.84+030141.1. Again I have no redshift data on it. Beside it to
the east is the smaller blue galaxy, SDSS J094602.46+030140.3, at 940
million light-years. Why there's data on the fainter one only I don't
know. Though it is unusual to see a blue galaxy at this distance.

At the top of the image almost directly above Arp 303 is a very red
small galaxy. It is SDSS J094618.88+031417.9 at 1.52 billion
light-years. To its east is what appears to be a group of very distant
galaxies. While I find each listed in the SDSS none carry any distance
data nor do I see a galaxy cluster listed for the area. To the southeast
of SDSS J094618.88+031417.9 is SDSS J094618.88+031417.9. It is listed
as being 930 million light-years distant. Go directly east from this
galaxy some distance and you come to two equally bright blue stars of
15th magnitude. Continue east to the first much fainter orange star.
Go southeast to another slightly fainter orange star. Continuing an
equal distance brings you to a blue star of about 20th magnitude. This
is the most distant object in the image that I'm aware of. It is the
quasar SDSS J094649.38+031152.7 with a redshift of z=2.059650. This
would put it about 10.5 billion light-years distant. The light was
leaving it about the time our galaxy was born and 6 billion years before
our sun was created.

Well left of center and a bit south are two 20th magnitude elliptical
galaxies that seem in the core of a bunch of much smaller and fainter
galaxies. Large galaxies often anchor galaxy clusters. Is that what's
happening here? I see no cluster listed. They are SDSS
J094702.91+030023.8 and SDSS J094704.71+030024.0. Red shift puts them
about 3.6 billion light-years away. None of the smaller, fainter
galaxies in the area have red shift data that I could find.

You might want to double the size of the image to see some of the
details mentioned above.

Arp's image:
http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/level...ig_arp303.jpeg

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x10 RGB-2x10, STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

Rick
--
Correct domain name is arvig and it is net not com. Prefix is correct.
Third character is a zero rather than a capital "Oh".



 




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