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ASTRO: NGC 6926 and more



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 3rd 14, 05:43 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Rick Johnson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,085
Default ASTRO: NGC 6926 and more

Galaxy hunting in Aquila is about like hunting polar bear in the
antarctic but there are a few there worth looking at. NGC 6926 is one
of them. It is a huge rather disrupted spiral galaxy some 150,000 light
years tall if you count the short plume to the north and 130,000 if you
don't. Either way it is a very large spiral. It's northern arm is
drawn out and has two major star clouds in it. The southern is so
disrupted it has a hole in the middle of it. It is part of a group of
galaxies. Two others in the group are in my image, NGC 6929, a peculiar
SA0+ galaxy to its east and UGC 11585 in the southwest corner of my
image which is also listed as a peculiar galaxy. The status of NGC 6929
as peculiar is a bit questionable as indicated by the colon in the
"pec:" designation. UGC 11585 however has no question about its
peculiarity. Like NGC 6929 it has an apparent hole in its disk. It
looks like I overprocessed it so the field star developed the dreaded
"Panda Eye" dark circle. But the dark area is real. An ordinary
looking edge on dwarf disk galaxy, 6dF J2032205-020828 may also be a
member of the group.

There's a trio of galaxies at the bottom center of the image that are
all about 720 million light-years away which may be part of another
galaxy group.

A distant member of the group, NGC 6922, lies far west out of my image.
It too is peculiar. It's quite unusual to have a group so full of
galaxies carrying the peculiar designation. Due to weather I was unable
to capture NGC 2922 this year. Maybe next year.

The field seems to have some faint nebulosity in it. I see a hint of it
in the blue POSS 1 plate so think it real. I had a light leak in my
system that started with the previous image at the end of July. I
didn't look at the images until August 8 when I found it was there and
fixed it. I don't think it the cause of the faint glow as it caused
other issues. Unfortunately I took 6 objects before realizing it was
there. None show this glow however, another reason to think it real.
Thus I left it in.

The field is little studied being deep in the Zone of Avoidance. Thus
the annotated image has only the galaxies mentioned above as none of the
many others in the image has much info at NED. Most aren't even listed
there, only those few that were strong IR sources to make the 2 micron
sky survey are listed. Since they are identified by position only I
didn't include them.

For a change I had normal transparency but seeing was running nearly 4".
I applied a lot of deconvolution to get it down to near 3". Far more
than I like to use. Still, for this year it's a good image, as
conditions have been so poor.

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x10' RGB=2x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME
--
Prefix is correct. Domain is arvig dot net

Attached Thumbnails
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Name:	NGC6926L4X10RGB2X10.JPG
Views:	287
Size:	370.8 KB
ID:	4970  Click image for larger version

Name:	NGC6926L4X10RGB2X10ID.JPG
Views:	149
Size:	228.1 KB
ID:	4971  
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  #2  
Old February 10th 14, 08:35 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Stefan Lilge
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,269
Default ASTRO: NGC 6926 and more

Two nice galaxies in one image in Aquila, not bad.
NGC 6926 is especially beautiful.

Stefan

"Rick Johnson" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...

Galaxy hunting in Aquila is about like hunting polar bear in the
antarctic but there are a few there worth looking at. NGC 6926 is one
of them. It is a huge rather disrupted spiral galaxy some 150,000 light
years tall if you count the short plume to the north and 130,000 if you
don't. Either way it is a very large spiral. It's northern arm is
drawn out and has two major star clouds in it. The southern is so
disrupted it has a hole in the middle of it. It is part of a group of
galaxies. Two others in the group are in my image, NGC 6929, a peculiar
SA0+ galaxy to its east and UGC 11585 in the southwest corner of my
image which is also listed as a peculiar galaxy. The status of NGC 6929
as peculiar is a bit questionable as indicated by the colon in the
"pec:" designation. UGC 11585 however has no question about its
peculiarity. Like NGC 6929 it has an apparent hole in its disk. It
looks like I overprocessed it so the field star developed the dreaded
"Panda Eye" dark circle. But the dark area is real. An ordinary
looking edge on dwarf disk galaxy, 6dF J2032205-020828 may also be a
member of the group.

There's a trio of galaxies at the bottom center of the image that are
all about 720 million light-years away which may be part of another
galaxy group.

A distant member of the group, NGC 6922, lies far west out of my image.
It too is peculiar. It's quite unusual to have a group so full of
galaxies carrying the peculiar designation. Due to weather I was unable
to capture NGC 2922 this year. Maybe next year.

The field seems to have some faint nebulosity in it. I see a hint of it
in the blue POSS 1 plate so think it real. I had a light leak in my
system that started with the previous image at the end of July. I
didn't look at the images until August 8 when I found it was there and
fixed it. I don't think it the cause of the faint glow as it caused
other issues. Unfortunately I took 6 objects before realizing it was
there. None show this glow however, another reason to think it real.
Thus I left it in.

The field is little studied being deep in the Zone of Avoidance. Thus
the annotated image has only the galaxies mentioned above as none of the
many others in the image has much info at NED. Most aren't even listed
there, only those few that were strong IR sources to make the 2 micron
sky survey are listed. Since they are identified by position only I
didn't include them.

For a change I had normal transparency but seeing was running nearly 4".
I applied a lot of deconvolution to get it down to near 3". Far more
than I like to use. Still, for this year it's a good image, as
conditions have been so poor.

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x10' RGB=2x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME
--
Prefix is correct. Domain is arvig dot net

 




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