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ASTRO: Peteshultz



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 27th 11, 07:10 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Rick Johnson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,085
Default ASTRO: Peteshultz

This is an intentional image of asteroids. I was fortunate to go to
high school with Pete Schultz. We helped form the Prairie Astronomy
Club in 1961 and did a lot of astrophotography together from a cow
pasture south of Lincoln Nebraska. I found many cow pies the hard way,
he seemed to avoid them. He worked for a camera store and would show up
with some really nice gear the store let him field test. So he was
using thousands of dollars worth of gear while I was using home made
stuff and el cheapo cameras and lenses scrounged from the used bin at
camera stores. Now he shoots holes in comets and gets sued by a Russian
astrologer for ruining her so called forecasts. I wish I was kidding,
but he no longer attends conferences in Russia for fear of being arrested.

I tried taking his asteroid last summer but it was lost in dense Milky
Way and further away so much fainter. Conditions were much better this
year. It was against a far less dense star field and a couple
magnitudes brighter at magnitude 17.3.

There are three other asteroids in the image.
(168440) 1998 WT2 at magnitude 19.2
(147923) 2006 VK34 at magnitude 19.3
(19753) 2000 CL94 at magnitude 17.1

These are all estimated magnitudes by the minor planet center.
Sometimes I find I disagree with their estimates but these seem quite
reasonable compared to my data.

The naming citation for his asteroid reads:
"Peter H. Schultz, a geologist at Brown University, has studied
cratering phenomena experimentally and in the field. He has played a
major role in defining and developing the Deep Impact mission,
particularly through his cratering experiments at the NASA Ames Vertical
Gun Range."

Animation and still image made from the same data.
14" LX200R @ f/10, L=6x10' RGB=2x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

The animation is at the Prairie Astronomy Club website (the one we
helped found 50 years ago). At 2 megabytes it will take a bit to load.
http://www.prairieastronomyclub.org/...hultz-anim.gif

The still and annotated images are attached. None of the galaxies in
the image had red shift data available so only the asteroids are pointed
out on the annotated image.

Rick
--
Correct domain name is arvig and it is net not com. Prefix is correct.
Third character is a zero rather than a capital "Oh".

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	PETESCHULTZ_OCT_20_2011_L6X10RGB2X10.JPG
Views:	243
Size:	264.2 KB
ID:	3786  Click image for larger version

Name:	PETESCHULTZ_OCT_20_2011_L6X10RGB2X10-ID.JPG
Views:	131
Size:	271.8 KB
ID:	3787  
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  #2  
Old October 27th 11, 10:41 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Stefan Lilge
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,269
Default ASTRO: Peteshultz

Rick,

Pete seems to be a fast guy; I don't know how fast main belt asteroids move,
but they are certainly faster than most of us ;-)

Stefan


"Rick Johnson" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
.com...
This is an intentional image of asteroids. I was fortunate to go to
high school with Pete Schultz. We helped form the Prairie Astronomy
Club in 1961 and did a lot of astrophotography together from a cow
pasture south of Lincoln Nebraska. I found many cow pies the hard way,
he seemed to avoid them. He worked for a camera store and would show up
with some really nice gear the store let him field test. So he was
using thousands of dollars worth of gear while I was using home made
stuff and el cheapo cameras and lenses scrounged from the used bin at
camera stores. Now he shoots holes in comets and gets sued by a Russian
astrologer for ruining her so called forecasts. I wish I was kidding,
but he no longer attends conferences in Russia for fear of being arrested.

I tried taking his asteroid last summer but it was lost in dense Milky
Way and further away so much fainter. Conditions were much better this
year. It was against a far less dense star field and a couple
magnitudes brighter at magnitude 17.3.

There are three other asteroids in the image.
(168440) 1998 WT2 at magnitude 19.2
(147923) 2006 VK34 at magnitude 19.3
(19753) 2000 CL94 at magnitude 17.1

These are all estimated magnitudes by the minor planet center.
Sometimes I find I disagree with their estimates but these seem quite
reasonable compared to my data.

The naming citation for his asteroid reads:
"Peter H. Schultz, a geologist at Brown University, has studied
cratering phenomena experimentally and in the field. He has played a
major role in defining and developing the Deep Impact mission,
particularly through his cratering experiments at the NASA Ames Vertical
Gun Range."

Animation and still image made from the same data.
14" LX200R @ f/10, L=6x10' RGB=2x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

The animation is at the Prairie Astronomy Club website (the one we
helped found 50 years ago). At 2 megabytes it will take a bit to load.
http://www.prairieastronomyclub.org/...hultz-anim.gif

The still and annotated images are attached. None of the galaxies in
the image had red shift data available so only the asteroids are pointed
out on the annotated image.

Rick
--
Correct domain name is arvig and it is net not com. Prefix is correct.
Third character is a zero rather than a capital "Oh".



  #3  
Old October 28th 11, 03:25 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Rick Johnson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,085
Default ASTRO: Peteshultz

I mistakenly said the color data was 2 ten minute images. That is what
I took but clouds forced me to throw out one round so the data line
should read RGB=1x10'.

Rick

On 10/27/2011 1:10 PM, Rick Johnson wrote:
This is an intentional image of asteroids. I was fortunate to go to high
school with Pete Schultz. We helped form the Prairie Astronomy Club in
1961 and did a lot of astrophotography together from a cow pasture south
of Lincoln Nebraska. I found many cow pies the hard way, he seemed to
avoid them. He worked for a camera store and would show up with some
really nice gear the store let him field test. So he was using thousands
of dollars worth of gear while I was using home made stuff and el cheapo
cameras and lenses scrounged from the used bin at camera stores. Now he
shoots holes in comets and gets sued by a Russian astrologer for ruining
her so called forecasts. I wish I was kidding, but he no longer attends
conferences in Russia for fear of being arrested.

I tried taking his asteroid last summer but it was lost in dense Milky
Way and further away so much fainter. Conditions were much better this
year. It was against a far less dense star field and a couple magnitudes
brighter at magnitude 17.3.

There are three other asteroids in the image.
(168440) 1998 WT2 at magnitude 19.2
(147923) 2006 VK34 at magnitude 19.3
(19753) 2000 CL94 at magnitude 17.1

These are all estimated magnitudes by the minor planet center. Sometimes
I find I disagree with their estimates but these seem quite reasonable
compared to my data.

The naming citation for his asteroid reads:
"Peter H. Schultz, a geologist at Brown University, has studied
cratering phenomena experimentally and in the field. He has played a
major role in defining and developing the Deep Impact mission,
particularly through his cratering experiments at the NASA Ames Vertical
Gun Range."

Animation and still image made from the same data.
14" LX200R @ f/10, L=6x10' RGB=2x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

The animation is at the Prairie Astronomy Club website (the one we
helped found 50 years ago). At 2 megabytes it will take a bit to load.
http://www.prairieastronomyclub.org/...hultz-anim.gif

The still and annotated images are attached. None of the galaxies in the
image had red shift data available so only the asteroids are pointed out
on the annotated image.

Rick



--
Correct domain name is arvig and it is net not com. Prefix is correct.
Third character is a zero rather than a capital "Oh".
  #4  
Old October 28th 11, 03:40 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Rick Johnson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,085
Default ASTRO: Peteshultz

Maybe not faster than Pete. Pete is a ball of energy so he moves fast.

Asteroid speed depends on where you catch them in their orbit. The
first time I imaged it last year it was near the end of retrograde
motion and thus moving slowly. This time it is mid retrograde so moving
about as fast as is possible when in retrograde. The other three
asteroids are also mid retrograde so are moving about the same speed.
If you catch them in prograde they can move even faster relative to the
stars. Of course distance has a bearing here. Closer gives a faster
motion as well and it was closer this time around. But I'd say this
trail is pretty normal for a mid retrograde main belt asteroid. The
trail is longer than normal for my images because it is 60 minutes long
rather than my normal 40 minutes. I wanted more frames for the movie.
Seeing the cloud sensor

I processed to hold the asteroid brightness pretty constant. Stars,
especially faint ones, very quite a bit due to the variable clouds and
seeing it was taken through

On 10/27/2011 4:41 PM, Stefan Lilge wrote:
Rick,

Pete seems to be a fast guy; I don't know how fast main belt asteroids move,
but they are certainly faster than most of us ;-)

Stefan


"Rick schrieb im Newsbeitrag
.com...
This is an intentional image of asteroids. I was fortunate to go to
high school with Pete Schultz. We helped form the Prairie Astronomy
Club in 1961 and did a lot of astrophotography together from a cow
pasture south of Lincoln Nebraska. I found many cow pies the hard way,
he seemed to avoid them. He worked for a camera store and would show up
with some really nice gear the store let him field test. So he was
using thousands of dollars worth of gear while I was using home made
stuff and el cheapo cameras and lenses scrounged from the used bin at
camera stores. Now he shoots holes in comets and gets sued by a Russian
astrologer for ruining her so called forecasts. I wish I was kidding,
but he no longer attends conferences in Russia for fear of being arrested.

I tried taking his asteroid last summer but it was lost in dense Milky
Way and further away so much fainter. Conditions were much better this
year. It was against a far less dense star field and a couple
magnitudes brighter at magnitude 17.3.

There are three other asteroids in the image.
(168440) 1998 WT2 at magnitude 19.2
(147923) 2006 VK34 at magnitude 19.3
(19753) 2000 CL94 at magnitude 17.1

These are all estimated magnitudes by the minor planet center.
Sometimes I find I disagree with their estimates but these seem quite
reasonable compared to my data.

The naming citation for his asteroid reads:
"Peter H. Schultz, a geologist at Brown University, has studied
cratering phenomena experimentally and in the field. He has played a
major role in defining and developing the Deep Impact mission,
particularly through his cratering experiments at the NASA Ames Vertical
Gun Range."

Animation and still image made from the same data.
14" LX200R @ f/10, L=6x10' RGB=2x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

The animation is at the Prairie Astronomy Club website (the one we
helped found 50 years ago). At 2 megabytes it will take a bit to load.
http://www.prairieastronomyclub.org/...hultz-anim.gif

The still and annotated images are attached. None of the galaxies in
the image had red shift data available so only the asteroids are pointed
out on the annotated image.

Rick
--
Correct domain name is arvig and it is net not com. Prefix is correct.
Third character is a zero rather than a capital "Oh".

 




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