A Space & astronomy forum. SpaceBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » SpaceBanter.com forum » Space Science » Policy
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Japanese can't get their maths right, Venus probe lost



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old December 10th 10, 10:07 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Anonymous Remailer (austria)
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 27
Default Japanese can't get their maths right, Venus probe lost


http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n1012/08akatsuki/

"We have found that the orbiter was not injected into the planned orbit
as a result of orbit estimation,"

In other words: we didn't get the maths right and fired the thrusters
at the wrong time...

This is simply embarrasing! Why didn't they ask NASA or ESA to verify
their calculations? Now they'll have to wait six more years for another
attempt and it's unlikely the craft will still be functioning then.


Ads
  #2  
Old December 10th 10, 11:40 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Sylvia Else[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 458
Default Japanese can't get their maths right, Venus probe lost

On 10/12/2010 9:07 PM, Anonymous Remailer (austria) wrote:
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n1012/08akatsuki/

"We have found that the orbiter was not injected into the planned orbit
as a result of orbit estimation,"

In other words: we didn't get the maths right and fired the thrusters
at the wrong time...

This is simply embarrasing! Why didn't they ask NASA or ESA to verify
their calculations? Now they'll have to wait six more years for another
attempt and it's unlikely the craft will still be functioning then.


Nothing there to suggest faulty maths. The orbit estimation they're
referring to relates to the trajectory it is now following. More likely
some technical malfunction during the burn.

Sylvia.
  #3  
Old December 10th 10, 03:18 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Pat Flannery
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18,466
Default Japanese can't get their maths right, Venus probe lost

On 12/10/2010 2:07 AM, Anonymous Remailer (austria) wrote:
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n1012/08akatsuki/

"We have found that the orbiter was not injected into the planned orbit
as a result of orbit estimation,"

In other words: we didn't get the maths right and fired the thrusters
at the wrong time...

This is simply embarrasing! Why didn't they ask NASA or ESA to verify
their calculations? Now they'll have to wait six more years for another
attempt and it's unlikely the craft will still be functioning then.


It could just be that the orbital entry engine burn shut down early.
I wouldn't ask NASA to give me any advice about how to put a spacecraft
into planetary orbit after the Mars Climate Orbiter.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_Climate_Orbiter

Pat

  #4  
Old December 11th 10, 01:17 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Sylvia Else[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 458
Default Japanese can't get their maths right, Venus probe lost

On 11/12/2010 2:18 AM, Pat Flannery wrote:
On 12/10/2010 2:07 AM, Anonymous Remailer (austria) wrote:
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n1012/08akatsuki/

"We have found that the orbiter was not injected into the planned orbit
as a result of orbit estimation,"

In other words: we didn't get the maths right and fired the thrusters
at the wrong time...

This is simply embarrasing! Why didn't they ask NASA or ESA to verify
their calculations? Now they'll have to wait six more years for another
attempt and it's unlikely the craft will still be functioning then.


It could just be that the orbital entry engine burn shut down early.
I wouldn't ask NASA to give me any advice about how to put a spacecraft
into planetary orbit after the Mars Climate Orbiter.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_Climate_Orbiter

Pat


Fair's fair - they were hampered by using a system of units developed in
the dark ages.

Sylvia.
  #5  
Old December 11th 10, 05:08 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Damon Hill[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 566
Default Japanese can't get their maths right, Venus probe lost

Pat Flannery wrote in
dakotatelephone:

On 12/10/2010 2:07 AM, Anonymous Remailer (austria) wrote:
http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n1012/08akatsuki/

"We have found that the orbiter was not injected into the planned orbit
as a result of orbit estimation,"

In other words: we didn't get the maths right and fired the thrusters
at the wrong time...

This is simply embarrasing! Why didn't they ask NASA or ESA to verify
their calculations? Now they'll have to wait six more years for another
attempt and it's unlikely the craft will still be functioning then.


It could just be that the orbital entry engine burn shut down early.
I wouldn't ask NASA to give me any advice about how to put a spacecraft
into planetary orbit after the Mars Climate Orbiter.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_Climate_Orbiter


That's what the most recent reports suggest: propellants transitioned
to oxidizer rich, damaging the engine nozzle, and threw the spacecraft
off balance. Possibly a problem with helium pressurization, similar
to problems with the Nozumi Mars probe.

At any rate, it's looking more and more like the main Venus mission is
lost because the propulsion system is nearly useless.

--Damon

  #7  
Old December 16th 10, 03:26 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Doug Freyburger
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 222
Default Japanese can't get their maths right, Venus probe lost

Dan Birchall wrote:

Apparently lobbing things at other planets is a little "hit or miss,"
to borrow an all-too-appropriate expression.


No correlation with the fact that "rocket science" is a popular synonym
for "hard to do". ;^)
  #8  
Old December 19th 10, 06:07 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Brad Guth[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15,176
Default Japanese can't get their maths right, Venus probe lost

On Dec 16, 7:26*am, Doug Freyburger wrote:
Dan Birchall wrote:

Apparently lobbing things at other planets is a little "hit or miss,"
to borrow an all-too-appropriate expression.


No correlation with the fact that "rocket science" is a popular synonym
for "hard to do". *;^)


We have multiple spendy public-funded supercomputers including all the
necessary 3D interactive simulators, so it it actually is fairly easy.

We also have overwhelmingly powerful microwave transmitters that can
pretty much foil any probe at the push of a button.

~ BG
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Japanese Moon probe to impact tomorrow Pat Flannery Policy 25 June 20th 09 12:21 AM
Japanese Moon probe to impact tomorrow bob haller History 7 June 13th 09 06:18 PM
Japanese probe - Hayabusa had touched down on asteroid itokawa afterall [email protected] Science 0 November 23rd 05 06:09 PM
Japanese probe - Hayabusa had touched down on asteroid itokawa afterall [email protected] Amateur Astronomy 0 November 23rd 05 06:09 PM
Japanese probe - Hayabusa had touched down on asteroid itokawa afterall [email protected] Misc 0 November 23rd 05 06:08 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 SpaceBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.