A Space & astronomy forum. SpaceBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » SpaceBanter.com forum » Others » Astro Pictures
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

ASTRO: Arp 82



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old April 15th 09, 08:17 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Rick Johnson[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default ASTRO: Arp 82

I hope this isn't a duplicate post but the computer hung up when sending
it the first time and it hasn't appeared on the server.
Rick
____________________

Arp 82 is an interacting pair of NGC galaxies, NGC 2535 (the big one)
and NGC 2536 its companion. They are about 200 million light years away
from us. Arp classified them in his category: "Spiral galaxies with
companions on arms: large; high surface brightness companions". Though
I wouldn't call NGC 2536 large it is much larger than the companions of
those with small companions. NGC 2535 is classed as SA(r)c pec and the
companion as SB(r)c pec. The (r) indicating they each contain a ring
like structure. Sometimes this can be rather hard to see but not in
these two. In fact if you look closely you will see the spiral arms
come off the rings rather than the core of the galaxies. The field is
rather void of other galaxies except for a lot of very faint distant
anonymous galaxies. The only other galaxy of any angular size in the
image is SDSS J081021.41+250720.2, a red fuzz ball down and right
(southwest) of Arp 82 toward the right edge of the image. It is nearly
twice the distance of Arp 82 at 386 million light years. There are
several quasars in the image as well as three asteroids. The quasars
carry only SDSS identifications that are just their coordinates in the
sky. I've attached an annotated image that points to these three
quasars giving their distance in billions of light years as well as the
three asteroids by their number. They a
(69363) 1994 PK14 at magnitude 18.9
(170765) 2004 CN57 at magnitude 19.5
(83484) 2001 SH93 at magnitude 19.0

A bright star sends in a column of light along the lower edge left of
center. Seems I'm often putting one on the edge of the sensor. Not
sure how I manage that so often. Seeing for this image was awful. A
lot of detail was lost. This winter has been odd in that the seeing has
been either better than normal or far worse but never plain "normal".

Arp's image of these two taken under far better seeing (normally the
case atop a mountain like Mt. Palomar) is at:
http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/level...big_arp82.jpeg

Arp 82 is located in the constellation of Cancer the crab.

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=8x10' RGB=2x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

Rick
--
Correct domain name is arvig and it is net not com. Prefix is correct.
Third character is a zero rather than a capital "Oh".



Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ARP82NGC2535-6L8X10RGB2X10X3.jpg
Views:	302
Size:	367.4 KB
ID:	2390  Click image for larger version

Name:	ARP82NGC2535-6L8X10RGB2X10X3IDR.jpg
Views:	93
Size:	142.9 KB
ID:	2391  
Ads
  #2  
Old April 16th 09, 12:34 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Richard Crisp[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 985
Default ASTRO: Arp 82

nice shot Rick

I always enjoy your galaxy images


  #3  
Old April 21st 09, 11:48 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Stefan Lilge
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,269
Default ASTRO: Arp 82

Rick, it only arrived on my server once. Good detail in this pair.

Stefan

"Rick Johnson" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
ster.com...
I hope this isn't a duplicate post but the computer hung up when sending
it the first time and it hasn't appeared on the server.
Rick
____________________

Arp 82 is an interacting pair of NGC galaxies, NGC 2535 (the big one)
and NGC 2536 its companion. They are about 200 million light years away
from us. Arp classified them in his category: "Spiral galaxies with
companions on arms: large; high surface brightness companions". Though
I wouldn't call NGC 2536 large it is much larger than the companions of
those with small companions. NGC 2535 is classed as SA(r)c pec and the
companion as SB(r)c pec. The (r) indicating they each contain a ring
like structure. Sometimes this can be rather hard to see but not in
these two. In fact if you look closely you will see the spiral arms
come off the rings rather than the core of the galaxies. The field is
rather void of other galaxies except for a lot of very faint distant
anonymous galaxies. The only other galaxy of any angular size in the
image is SDSS J081021.41+250720.2, a red fuzz ball down and right
(southwest) of Arp 82 toward the right edge of the image. It is nearly
twice the distance of Arp 82 at 386 million light years. There are
several quasars in the image as well as three asteroids. The quasars
carry only SDSS identifications that are just their coordinates in the
sky. I've attached an annotated image that points to these three
quasars giving their distance in billions of light years as well as the
three asteroids by their number. They a
(69363) 1994 PK14 at magnitude 18.9
(170765) 2004 CN57 at magnitude 19.5
(83484) 2001 SH93 at magnitude 19.0

A bright star sends in a column of light along the lower edge left of
center. Seems I'm often putting one on the edge of the sensor. Not
sure how I manage that so often. Seeing for this image was awful. A
lot of detail was lost. This winter has been odd in that the seeing has
been either better than normal or far worse but never plain "normal".

Arp's image of these two taken under far better seeing (normally the
case atop a mountain like Mt. Palomar) is at:
http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/level...big_arp82.jpeg

Arp 82 is located in the constellation of Cancer the crab.

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=8x10' RGB=2x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

Rick
--
Correct domain name is arvig and it is net not com. Prefix is correct.
Third character is a zero rather than a capital "Oh".





 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[sci.astro,sci.astro.seti] Contents (Astronomy Frequently Asked Questions) (0/9) [email protected] Astronomy Misc 0 August 15th 07 09:36 PM
[sci.astro,sci.astro.seti] Contents (Astronomy Frequently Asked Questions) (0/9) [email protected] SETI 0 August 15th 07 09:36 PM
[sci.astro,sci.astro.seti] Contents (Astronomy Frequently Asked Questions) (0/9) [email protected] SETI 0 October 6th 05 02:34 AM
[sci.astro,sci.astro.seti] Contents (Astronomy Frequently Asked Questions) (0/9) [email protected] Astronomy Misc 0 October 6th 05 02:34 AM
[sci.astro,sci.astro.seti] Contents (Astronomy Frequently Asked Questions) (0/9) [email protected] SETI 0 September 30th 04 02:23 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 SpaceBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.