A Space & astronomy forum. SpaceBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » SpaceBanter.com forum » Space Science » Policy
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Dragon Is In Orbit!



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old December 8th 10, 04:06 PM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Jeff Findley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,012
Default Dragon Is In Orbit!

In article
tatelephone,
says...

Whole ascent went just great, and they got some really good video of the
stage burns and Dragon separation.


I watched the video live and was amazed at how stable Falcon 9 was
during the 1st and 2nd stage burns. The earth (in the camera
background) was rock solid, which shows that the attitude and roll of
Falcon 9 was rock solid. Nicely done!

This page has updates:
http://www.spacex.com/webcast.php

Jeff
--
42
Ads
  #2  
Old December 8th 10, 05:00 PM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
William Mook[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,840
Default Dragon Is In Orbit!

On Dec 8, 1:23*pm, Pat Flannery wrote:
On 12/8/2010 9:55 AM, Pat Flannery wrote:

Whole ascent went just great, and they got some really good video of the
stage burns and Dragon separation.


Good communications with Dragon, and she is firing her thrusters.
No word yet if they got a successful parachute recovery on the first stage.

Pat


Since the first stage represents most of the hardware - recovery of it
is potentially very interesting in producing a low-cost operation. I
know they had cracks on their expansion nozzle after testing the upper
stage engines. First stage seemed to be in better shape after testing
- despite high pressure in the chamber during one of the tests.

What was the TRL-rating of the parachute recovery system before they
flew it here? I think theyre calling it an evaluation - before making
claims about it - which is sensible. Still, reusable systems are the
way to go where possible. The first stage is low hanging fruit as
Buzz Aldrin has been saying for 40 years, and vonBraun said for 40
years before that! I'm glad to see SpaceX is doing something about
it.
  #3  
Old December 8th 10, 05:05 PM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
William Mook[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,840
Default Dragon Is In Orbit!

On Dec 8, 11:06*am, Jeff Findley wrote:
In article
tatelephone,
says...



Whole ascent went just great, and they got some really good video of the
stage burns and Dragon separation.


I watched the video live and was amazed at how stable Falcon 9 was
during the 1st and 2nd stage burns. *The earth (in the camera
background) was rock solid, which shows that the attitude and roll of
Falcon 9 was rock solid. *Nicely done!

This page has updates:
* *http://www.spacex.com/webcast.php

Jeff
--
42


Liquid fueled rockets are very smooth compared to solids. Vibration
resistant gyroscopicaly stabilized cameras were first developed by the
movie industry for use on helicopters. If you look at the rocket body
as well as the Earth I think some of the solidity had to do with the
excellent engineering that went into the camera as well as the rocket
itself.
  #4  
Old December 8th 10, 05:51 PM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Brad Guth[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15,176
Default Dragon Is In Orbit!

On Dec 8, 9:00*am, William Mook wrote:
On Dec 8, 1:23*pm, Pat Flannery wrote:

On 12/8/2010 9:55 AM, Pat Flannery wrote:


Whole ascent went just great, and they got some really good video of the
stage burns and Dragon separation.


Good communications with Dragon, and she is firing her thrusters.
No word yet if they got a successful parachute recovery on the first stage.


Pat


Since the first stage represents most of the hardware - recovery of it
is potentially very interesting in producing a low-cost operation. *I
know they had cracks on their expansion nozzle after testing the upper
stage engines. *First stage seemed to be in better shape after testing
- despite high pressure in the chamber during one of the tests.

What was the TRL-rating of the parachute recovery system before they
flew it here? *I think theyre calling it an evaluation - before making
claims about it - which is sensible. *Still, reusable systems are the
way to go where possible. *The first stage is low hanging fruit as
Buzz Aldrin has been saying for 40 years, and vonBraun said for 40
years before that! *I'm glad to see SpaceX is doing something about
it.


Too bad they had to reinvent most everything, and trial and error lear
on the fly (so to speak), instead of using existing technology that
was proven reliable and even in surplus, as in all bought and paid for
several times over, not to mention our having wasted yet another
public funded decade.

~ BG
  #5  
Old December 8th 10, 05:55 PM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Pat Flannery
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18,466
Default Dragon Is In Orbit!

Whole ascent went just great, and they got some really good video of the
stage burns and Dragon separation.

Pat
  #6  
Old December 8th 10, 06:23 PM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Pat Flannery
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18,466
Default Dragon Is In Orbit!

On 12/8/2010 9:55 AM, Pat Flannery wrote:
Whole ascent went just great, and they got some really good video of the
stage burns and Dragon separation.


Good communications with Dragon, and she is firing her thrusters.
No word yet if they got a successful parachute recovery on the first stage.

Pat
  #7  
Old December 8th 10, 11:25 PM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Pat Flannery
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18,466
Default Dragon Is In Orbit!

On 12/8/2010 10:23 AM, Pat Flannery wrote:
On 12/8/2010 9:55 AM, Pat Flannery wrote:
Whole ascent went just great, and they got some really good video of the
stage burns and Dragon separation.


Good communications with Dragon, and she is firing her thrusters.


And she came down intact in the landing area, and has been recovered:
http://spaceflightnow.com/falcon9/002/status.html
Now NASA is having a press conference, and the sound is all screwed up.
Way to go, NASA. :-D

Pat
  #8  
Old December 9th 10, 12:29 AM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Mike DiCenso
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 150
Default Dragon Is In Orbit!

On Dec 8, 4:25*pm, Pat Flannery wrote:
On 12/8/2010 10:23 AM, Pat Flannery wrote:

On 12/8/2010 9:55 AM, Pat Flannery wrote:
Whole ascent went just great, and they got some really good video of the
stage burns and Dragon separation.


Good communications with Dragon, and she is firing her thrusters.


And she came down intact in the landing area, and has been recovered:http://spaceflightnow.com/falcon9/002/status.html
Now NASA is having a press conference, and the sound is all screwed up.
Way to go, NASA. :-D



It sounded just fine to me. Maybe something to do with your end of
things?

Big congrats to both Space X and NASA. This is how these kinds of
things should work for government-private business partnerships.
NASA's help, both in being a reliable customer, and in providing
technology with the Ames-developed PICA heatshield insulation as well
as other support. The same with Bigelow Aerospace and the transfer of
the Transhab technologies developed at Johnson Space Center.

One thing I take exception to is Elon Musk trying to paint Dragon as
having more capability than Orion. As an example he claimed that the
Dragon class capsules had more volume than does an Orion one. Yet
simple geometrics shows that to be incorrect since Orion is the wider
and taller of the two, has 19 meters cubed of internal volume versus
10 m^3 for Dragon. I would find it hard to believe that the available
*habitable* volume (8.9 m^3 for Orion) is signficantly less than
Dragon's. Also Orion's service module is far bigger than Dragon's, and
an Orion spacecraft as a whole is twice as massive as a Dragon is
given the Orion is intended to support manned deep space missions from
the get-go.

So Elon, please, get your facts straight, or just ease off on the
hype. Orion will live or die on it's own, you just need to stay on
course and focus on ensuring more success for Dragon and Falcon 9, and
you'll have a pretty good slice of the LEO cargo and human
transportation market.
-Mike
  #9  
Old December 9th 10, 05:02 AM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Matt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 258
Default Dragon Is In Orbit!

Also Orion's service module is far bigger than Dragon's, and
an Orion spacecraft as a whole is twice as massive as a Dragon is
given the Orion is intended to support manned deep space missions from
the get-go.

The original Orion was intended to do that. Isn't the compromised,
stripped-down one forced by Ares I limitations a great deal less
capable?

Matt
  #10  
Old December 9th 10, 05:09 AM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Brian Thorn[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,266
Default Dragon Is In Orbit!

On Wed, 8 Dec 2010 21:02:53 -0800 (PST), Matt
wrote:

Also Orion's service module is far bigger than Dragon's, and
an Orion spacecraft as a whole is twice as massive as a Dragon is
given the Orion is intended to support manned deep space missions from
the get-go.

The original Orion was intended to do that. Isn't the compromised,
stripped-down one forced by Ares I limitations a great deal less
capable?


No, it went from six to four crew for ISS missions (it never needed
six anyway with Soyuz ever-present) and abandoned land recovery, but
it is still Beyond LEO capable.

Brian
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
GE Apollo and Sea Dragon Pat Flannery History 1 March 21st 10 02:46 PM
Enter the Dragon? [email protected] History 8 November 9th 08 04:33 PM
Enter the Dragon? MO Policy 10 July 18th 08 11:52 PM
SpaceX Dragon are Policy 6 March 25th 07 12:19 PM
Space-X Dragon Jeff Findley Policy 46 February 19th 07 04:35 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 SpaceBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.