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  #1  
Old December 14th 13, 11:53 PM posted to sci.space.history
Fevric J. Glandules
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Default Rabbit, run!

Nice to see something moving on the lunar surface again.

Looking forward to the selfies.

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  #2  
Old December 16th 13, 02:02 AM posted to sci.space.history
Brad Guth[_3_]
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Default Rabbit, run!

On Saturday, December 14, 2013 3:53:26 PM UTC-8, Fevric J. Glandules wrote:
Nice to see something moving on the lunar surface again.



Looking forward to the selfies.


Full spectrum color images, as raw and otherwise unmodified by anyone would be a real accomplishment.

Gamma spectrometry samples should follow suit, as also unfiltered or modified by anyone would be several steps or levels better than anything our NASA/Apollo era delivered.
  #3  
Old December 16th 13, 06:21 PM posted to sci.space.history
Rick Jones
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Default Rabbit, run!

Fevric J. Glandules wrote:
Nice to see something moving on the lunar surface again.


Looking forward to the selfies.


Many of the images I have seen have been somewhat brown/sepia toned.
Any idea what causes that?

rick jones
--
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these opinions are mine, all mine; HP might not want them anyway...
feel free to post, OR email to rick.jones2 in hp.com but NOT BOTH...
  #4  
Old December 16th 13, 09:57 PM posted to sci.space.history
Anthony Frost
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Posts: 241
Default Rabbit, run!

In message
Rick Jones wrote:

Fevric J. Glandules wrote:
Nice to see something moving on the lunar surface again.


Looking forward to the selfies.


Many of the images I have seen have been somewhat brown/sepia toned.
Any idea what causes that?


Quite a few, if not all, of the early pictures are photos of the big
display screen in the mission control room rather than the original
image as received.

Anthony

  #5  
Old December 17th 13, 02:18 AM posted to sci.space.history
Rick Jones
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Posts: 685
Default Rabbit, run!

Anthony Frost wrote:
In message
Rick Jones wrote:
Many of the images I have seen have been somewhat brown/sepia
toned. Any idea what causes that?


Quite a few, if not all, of the early pictures are photos of the big
display screen in the mission control room rather than the original
image as received.


OK, I'm willing to iterate What makes those (or misson control's
screen) brown/sepia toned?

rick jones
--
firebug n, the idiot who tosses a lit cigarette out his car window
these opinions are mine, all mine; HP might not want them anyway...
feel free to post, OR email to rick.jones2 in hp.com but NOT BOTH...
  #6  
Old December 17th 13, 08:58 PM posted to sci.space.history
Brad Guth[_3_]
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Posts: 15,176
Default Rabbit, run!

On Saturday, December 14, 2013 3:53:26 PM UTC-8, Fevric J. Glandules wrote:
Nice to see something moving on the lunar surface again.



Looking forward to the selfies.


Why are their cameras malfunctioning or simply broken?

Why are their gamma spectrometry instruments still not working?

What sort of lens optics and narrow bandpass filters do each of their cameras have to work with?
  #7  
Old December 17th 13, 09:20 PM posted to sci.space.history
Brad Guth[_3_]
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Posts: 15,176
Default Rabbit, run!

CCD imagers heated to 117 C typically do not perform very well, if at all. Active cooling of their imager is required.

Their mission science must include active data as to internal circuitry temps and methods of actively cooling. So, where is this mission critical data and their camera design/engineering specs?

Modern cameras can easily outperform conventional film dynamic range by at least 5 db (not to mention their much wider color spectrum sensitivity which can include IR and UV), or an equivalent of 32 f-stops, and a truly scientific CCD imager should easily obtain a 6 DB or 64 f-stop advantage over Kodak film (especially of individually recorded images at maximum resolution using a CCD imager populated with at least 16.777 million pixels or photon buckets, as opposed to a video camera of only HDTV quality that’s not any better than a GoPro delivers).

Why are their cameras malfunctioning, or are they simply broken?

Why are their gamma spectrometry instruments still not working?

What sort of lens optics and narrow bandpass filters do each of their cameras have to work with?

Why are those local X-ray and gamma radiation readings not being recorded?



On Saturday, December 14, 2013 3:53:26 PM UTC-8, Fevric J. Glandules wrote:
Nice to see something moving on the lunar surface again.



Looking forward to the selfies.


  #8  
Old December 18th 13, 06:50 AM posted to sci.space.history
Anthony Frost
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Posts: 241
Default Rabbit, run!

In message
Rick Jones wrote:

Anthony Frost wrote:
In message
Rick Jones wrote:
Many of the images I have seen have been somewhat brown/sepia
toned. Any idea what causes that?


Quite a few, if not all, of the early pictures are photos of the big
display screen in the mission control room rather than the original
image as received.


OK, I'm willing to iterate What makes those (or misson control's
screen) brown/sepia toned?


Intervening glass, mismatch between display phosphors and camera
filters, ambient lighting conditions and so on. You'll get odd effects
with any attempts to photograph monitors.

Anthony

  #9  
Old December 18th 13, 04:33 PM posted to sci.space.history
Brad Guth[_3_]
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Posts: 15,176
Default Rabbit, run!

On Saturday, December 14, 2013 3:53:26 PM UTC-8, Fevric J. Glandules wrote:
Nice to see something moving on the lunar surface again.



Looking forward to the selfies.


CCD imagers heated to 117 C typically do not perform very well, if at all. Active cooling of their imager is required and must always be monitored and regulated by the local and terrestrial computers. Their mission science must include active data feed as to all of their internal circuitry temps and methods of actively cooling. So, where is this mission critical data feed and their camera design/engineering specs?

Modern digital cameras can easily outperform conventional film DR(dynamic range) by at least 5 db (not to mention offering their much wider color spectrum sensitivity which can include IR and UV), providing an equivalent of 32 times better DR, and a truly advanced scientific CCD imager should easily obtain a 6 DB or 64:1 DR advantage over Kodak film (especially of individually recorded images at maximum resolution using an actively cooled CCD imager populated with at least 16.777 million pixels or photon buckets, as opposed to a video camera of only HDTV quality that’s not any better than what a retail consumer GoPro delivers). Problem is, these fancy imagers need to be kept relatively cool.

There are some really good CMOS and CCD imagers, not to mention newer better imagers of large area format from China:

http://leicarumors.com/2012/09/19/th...y-cmosis.aspx/
http://leicarumors.com/2010/11/07/ko...d-sensor.aspx/

http://www.e2v-us.com/products-and-s...d/?e2vredirect

http://www.e2v-us.com/e2v/assets/Fil...84-bi-nimo.pdf

Why wouldn’t they send their very best CCD imagers and camera optics to the moon?

Why are their cameras malfunctioning, or are they simply dysfunctional due to the heat?

Why are their gamma spectrometry instruments still not working? (is it too hot by day?)

What sort of special lens optics and narrow bandpass filters do each of their cameras have to work with?

Why are those local X-ray and gamma radiation readings not being recorded and shared with the world?

“ESTIMATION OF THE SURFACE TEMPERATURE OF FLAT AREAS ON THE MOON”
“A 1322.5 w/m2 change of the ESI would lead to 179.4K change in surface daytime temperature”

Perhaps imaging and other science via cool(179 K) planetshine or ESI should more than do the trick by offering up to 3.9 w/m2 illuminating upon the surface, offering plenty of working illumination inspite of their physically dark as coal surface. Combining of pixels offers the same benefit as having larger area pixels, such as with four times the low-light sensitivity and only a fourth the resolution is still offering an impressive 4.19 million pixel CCD image and still using large format optics doesn’t leave all that much to be desired, not to mention what a little bit of artificial illumination and especially of what the UV spectrum has to offer for the detection of all those secondary/recoil photons within our human visual spectrum.
  #10  
Old January 30th 14, 04:27 AM posted to sci.space.history
Bob Haller
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Posts: 3,197
Default Rabbit, run!

looks like rabbit has some issues, its warranty may be expired
 




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