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NASA Seeks Space Launch System Advanced Development Solutions



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 21st 12, 06:24 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Alan Erskine[_3_]
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Posts: 1,026
Default NASA Seeks Space Launch System Advanced Development Solutions

What's a "metric ton" as mentioned in this article?

On 21/03/2012 9:43 AM, wrote:
Mar. 20, 2012

Michael Braukus
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1979


Jennifer Stanfield
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
256-544-7199


RELEASE: 12-088

NASA SEEKS SPACE LAUNCH SYSTEM ADVANCED DEVELOPMENT SOLUTIONS

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. -- NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville,
Ala., has issued a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) for advanced
development proposals to support the nation's next heavy-lift rocket,
the Space Launch System (SLS).

NASA is soliciting proposals from industry and academia for innovative
advanced development in areas including concept development, trades
and analyses, propulsion, structures, materials, manufacturing,
avionics and software. These efforts will focus on affordability and
sustainability of the SLS as it evolves from a 70-metric-ton vehicle
to a 130-metric-ton vehicle.

"We look forward to hearing from both industry and academia on
advanced development solutions that will enable the full capability
of the evolved Space Launch System," said Mindy Niedermeyer, the
evaluation team chair. "It's an exciting time for NASA. These
solutions will create entirely new developments in space technology,
taking humans farther in space than ever before."

NASA anticipates making multiple awards in response to this
solicitation with approximately $48 million in total funding. Of this
total amount, the funding anticipated for the base year (Fiscal Year
2013) is $22 million, with $14.5 million for the first year option
(Fiscal Year 2014), and $11.5 million for the second year option
(Fiscal Year 15). Total funding to be allocated to academic awards
for this NRA is approximately $1.5 million per year. Individual
academic awards are expected to be valued up to $250,000 per year.
The deadline to submit proposals is May 15, 2012.

To view the announcement and instructions for submissions, visit:

http://prod.nais.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/ep...i?acqid=149905

For more information about SLS, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/sls

-end-


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  #2  
Old March 21st 12, 07:11 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Harold Groot
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Posts: 34
Default NASA Seeks Space Launch System Advanced Development Solutions

On Wed, 21 Mar 2012 16:24:37 +1100, Alan Erskine
wrote:

What's a "metric ton" as mentioned in this article?


A metric ton is 1000 kilograms. It equals 2205 pounds.

This is not the same as the English ton (aka long ton), which is 2240
pounds. And of course, it is not the same as the American/Canadian ton
(aka short ton) of 2000 pounds.


  #3  
Old March 22nd 12, 01:52 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Quadibloc
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Posts: 7,018
Default NASA Seeks Space Launch System Advanced Development Solutions

On Mar 21, 12:11*am, (Harold Groot) wrote:
On Wed, 21 Mar 2012 16:24:37 +1100, Alan Erskine
wrote:


What's a "metric ton" as mentioned in this article?


A metric ton is 1000 kilograms. *It equals 2205 pounds.

This is not the same as the English ton (aka long ton), which is 2240
pounds. And of course, it is not the same as the American/Canadian ton
(aka short ton) of 2000 pounds.


The "metric ton" is also sometimes called the "tonne". But I'm
surprised that it never seems to be called what it is: a megagram.
People seeing _that_ name would immediately know the value of the
unit.

John Savard
  #4  
Old March 22nd 12, 10:18 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Robert Clark
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Posts: 1,150
Default NASA Seeks Space Launch System Advanced Development Solutions

On Wednesday, March 21, 2012 8:52:36 PM UTC-4, Quadibloc wrote:
On Mar 21, 12:11*am, (Harold Groot) wrote:
On Wed, 21 Mar 2012 16:24:37 +1100, Alan Erskine
wrote:


What's a "metric ton" as mentioned in this article?


A metric ton is 1000 kilograms. *It equals 2205 pounds.

This is not the same as the English ton (aka long ton), which is 2240
pounds. And of course, it is not the same as the American/Canadian ton
(aka short ton) of 2000 pounds.


The "metric ton" is also sometimes called the "tonne". But I'm
surprised that it never seems to be called what it is: a megagram.
People seeing _that_ name would immediately know the value of the
unit.

John Savard



It is sometimes called a megagram (Mg) in some technical reports. I actually prefer the term "metric ton" (mT) though.


Bob Clark
  #5  
Old March 22nd 12, 02:30 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Brad Guth[_3_]
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Posts: 15,176
Default NASA Seeks Space Launch System Advanced Development Solutions

On Mar 20, 10:24*pm, Alan Erskine wrote:
What's a "metric ton" as mentioned in this article?

On 21/03/2012 9:43 AM, wrote:


Mar. 20, 2012


Michael Braukus
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1979


Jennifer Stanfield
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
256-544-7199


RELEASE: 12-088


NASA SEEKS SPACE LAUNCH SYSTEM ADVANCED DEVELOPMENT SOLUTIONS


HUNTSVILLE, Ala. -- NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville,
Ala., has issued a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) for advanced
development proposals to support the nation's next heavy-lift rocket,
the Space Launch System (SLS).


NASA is soliciting proposals from industry and academia for innovative
advanced development in areas including concept development, trades
and analyses, propulsion, structures, materials, manufacturing,
avionics and software. These efforts will focus on affordability and
sustainability of the SLS as it evolves from a 70-metric-ton vehicle
to a 130-metric-ton vehicle.


"We look forward to hearing from both industry and academia on
advanced development solutions that will enable the full capability
of the evolved Space Launch System," said Mindy Niedermeyer, the
evaluation team chair. "It's an exciting time for NASA. These
solutions will create entirely new developments in space technology,
taking humans farther in space than ever before."


NASA anticipates making multiple awards in response to this
solicitation with approximately $48 million in total funding. Of this
total amount, the funding anticipated for the base year (Fiscal Year
2013) is $22 million, with $14.5 million for the first year option
(Fiscal Year 2014), and $11.5 million for the second year option
(Fiscal Year 15). Total funding to be allocated to academic awards
for this NRA is approximately $1.5 million per year. Individual
academic awards are expected to be valued up to $250,000 per year.
The deadline to submit proposals is May 15, 2012.


To view the announcement and instructions for submissions, visit:


http://prod.nais.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/ep...i?acqid=149905


For more information about SLS, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/sls


-end-


Why are you guys still screwing with us, by flatulating over the
"metric ton".

Our NASA is so screwed up that they still can't get with the metric
system, and yet you guys just continue to screw with us. I seem to
recall that William Mook offered multiple heavy lift solutions that
wouldn't have cost us 10% as much per tonne deployed into orbit, and
once again you guys blew him off.

Now that our NASA is so poorly funded and can't afford to pay their
electric bill, or hardly flush a toilet, you expect some wealthy
Zionist redneck fly-by-rocket wizard to come along and save the day
with their own public-funded as need-to-know or taboo/nondisclosure
technology that only you guys get to milk for all it's worth.

Good luck with that sort of oligarch arrogance.

http://groups.google.com/groups/search
http://translate.google.com/#
Brad Guth, Brad_Guth, Brad.Guth, BradGuth, BG / “Guth Usenet”
  #6  
Old March 22nd 12, 06:20 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Rick Jones
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Posts: 685
Default NASA Seeks Space Launch System Advanced Development Solutions

Quadibloc wrote:
But I'm surprised that it never seems to be called what it is: a
megagram. People seeing _that_ name would immediately know the
value of the unit.


You mean a really long or valueable message delivered by Western
Union?-)

rick jones
--
I don't interest myself in "why." I think more often in terms of
"when," sometimes "where;" always "how much." - Joubert
these opinions are mine, all mine; HP might not want them anyway...
feel free to post, OR email to rick.jones2 in hp.com but NOT BOTH...
  #7  
Old March 23rd 12, 03:37 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Greg \(Strider\) Moore
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Posts: 790
Default NASA Seeks Space Launch System Advanced Development Solutions

"Rick Jones" wrote in message ...

Quadibloc wrote:
But I'm surprised that it never seems to be called what it is: a
megagram. People seeing _that_ name would immediately know the
value of the unit.


You mean a really long or valueable message delivered by Western
Union?-)


Yes, but how big are the candygrams delivered by Mongo?


rick jones


--
Greg D. Moore http://greenmountainsoftware.wordpress.com/
CEO QuiCR: Quick, Crowdsourced Responses. http://www.quicr.net
  #8  
Old March 23rd 12, 09:21 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Rick Jones
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 685
Default NASA Seeks Space Launch System Advanced Development Solutions

"Greg \(Strider\) Moore" wrote:
"Rick Jones" wrote in message ...
You mean a really long or valueable message delivered by Western
Union?-)


Yes, but how big are the candygrams delivered by Mongo?


For Mongo. While few would want the candygram delivered for Mongo, I
suspect fewer still would want one delivered by Mongo

rick jones
--
Wisdom Teeth are impacted, people are affected by the effects of events.
these opinions are mine, all mine; HP might not want them anyway...
feel free to post, OR email to rick.jones2 in hp.com but NOT BOTH...
  #9  
Old March 24th 12, 09:24 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Dr J R Stockton[_154_]
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Posts: 5
Default NASA Seeks Space Launch System Advanced Development Solutions

In sci.space.policy message [email protected]
00pbc.googlegroups.com, Wed, 21 Mar 2012 17:52:36, Quadibloc
posted:

On Mar 21, 12:11*am, (Harold Groot) wrote:
On Wed, 21 Mar 2012 16:24:37 +1100, Alan Erskine
wrote:


What's a "metric ton" as mentioned in this article?


A metric ton is 1000 kilograms. *It equals 2205 pounds.

This is not the same as the English ton (aka long ton), which is 2240
pounds. And of course, it is not the same as the American/Canadian ton
(aka short ton) of 2000 pounds.


The "metric ton" is also sometimes called the "tonne". But I'm
surprised that it never seems to be called what it is: a megagram.
People seeing _that_ name would immediately know the value of the
unit.


It is not common because the gram is not the SI base unit. The kilogram
is the SI base unit, symbol kg. It should be renamed the klog, symbol
kg, and then a Tonne would eventually become a kkg and a gram a mkg.


RC : mT is not suitable, since it is SI for milliTesla (which is a
moderately convenient amount of magnetic flux density). Moreover, in a
mass context, mT looks as if it might be milliTonne.

--
(c) John Stockton, near London.
Web http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/ - FAQish topics, acronyms, and links.
Correct = 4-line sig. separator as above, a line precisely "-- " (RFC5536/7)
Do not Mail News to me. Before a reply, quote with "" or " " (RFC5536/7)
 




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