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Perihelion Advance of Mercury.



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 27th 08, 01:07 AM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 43
Default Perihelion Advance of Mercury.

The post is duplicated at this address.
http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/sun-merc.html
--------

Perihelion Advance Of Mercury.

In the Sun-Mercury closed gravitating system, from the viewpoint
of the Sun, Mercury is oscillating back and forth, and from the
viewpoint of Mercury it's the Sun that's oscillating back and
forth. Beyond that, there is nothing else of any consequence
within that system. Mercury's orbit trajectory is determined
entirely from within that closed system.

http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/orbit1.gif

The Sun is 5555556 times the mass of Mercury, and Mercury's orbit
eccentricity from aphelion to perihelion is 2.4E+10 meters, so
the Sun will oscillate over only 4320 meters.

When a change in the force of gravity is rapidly introduced into
the system, i.e. during the fall or rise between the aphelion
and perihelion, the change is necessarily directly added to or
subtracted from the normal Newtonian gravity rate and the
consequence will be as per diagrams.

http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc2.jpg

But that has nothing to do with the gravity anisotropy generated
by Mercury's motion to and from the Sun, _which has slowly
evolved to its current state over millions of years._

In the next diagram, the oscillatory motion of an object moving
along the trajectory of the yellow line has been well
established, and the straight line represents the plane where
all forces will be zero. In order to halt the downward motion at
point 1 and send it back to intersect with the line at point 2,
a constant force is applied for the duration of the journey
between points 1 and 2. The same applies for the journey between
points 2 and 3, but the force direction is reversed. There's no
other way the system could function. And it's permanently
sustainable so long as the forces remain.

http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc6.jpg

The force directions are exactly the same as those for the
gravity anisotropy generated by Mercury's radial velocity
relative to the Sun. In that case they act at 90 degrees to the
line between the aphelion and perihelion. It's also exactly the
same system as that for Mercury's natural elliptical orbit, where
the forces are applied along the line through the aphelion and
perihelion (not shown).

http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc5.jpg

When the straight line graph is converted to an elliptical orbit,
the forces all point in the same direction relative to the
universe.

http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc8.jpg

This diagram was generated using the true anisotropy which is
added to the Newtonian gravity rate. It's totally unsustainable
and has nothing whatever to do with the gravity anisotropy.

http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc4.jpg
http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc7.jpg

This is the only thing of consequence resulting from the
anisotropy. The Sun and Mercury oscillate back and forth as
though they are connected by some invisible spring.

http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/orbit2.gif

The eccentricity in that system is around .00048 that of the
natural orbit system.

Since both systems function in exactly the same way, they will
proportionally play the same role in determining the rate of
perihelion advance, if there is a role to play.

The only apparent in-elasticity in each system is through
variations in the time delay in the gravity link between the Sun
and Mercury. At the perihelion of Mercury's orbit, the delay in
its relationship with the Sun is (perihelion radius divided by
the speed of light) = 153 seconds. By the time it has reached
its aphelion the delay has become 233 seconds. It has lost an
additional 80 seconds in its relationship with the Sun.

The time delay has some consequence. It will cause Mercury's
natural trajectory to point further away from the Sun enroute to
the aphelion because centrifugal force is unaffected by gravity,
while centripetal force has been reduced over the increasing
delay time as Mercury moves further away from the Sun. Mercury
would be traveling faster toward the aphelion than normally
expected. Enroute to the perihelion, the relationship between
the Sun and Mercury has gained an additional 80 seconds. Radial
velocity will again increase asymmetrically compared with a
naturally flowing orbit.

Any deviation from the natural flow of a stable elliptical orbit
will have gyroscopic consequences that will manifest themselves
at 90 degrees to the change direction. The initial asymmetric
force direction is not where the force has been counteracted.
That is always advanced by 90 degrees. On average, the asymmetric
force is geared toward directly advancing Mercury's orbit
ellipse.

If the average radial velocity is around 5000 m/sec (it's more),
multiplying that by 80 * 2 seconds for the complete orbit gives
a 800000 meter advance for each orbit cycle, which is far too
much. But the story doesn't end there.

The time delay in the gravity link between the Sun and Mercury
is measured in the realm of light-time-gravity, where all linear
measurements involve the dual planes of dimension perpendicular
to the line along which the measurement is taken. But such a line
doesn't exist in that realm because every measurement involves
all dimensions.

The hypotenuse length of the imaginary right angle triangle
scribed in space by a light ray emerging perpendicular to the
line of motion, from a source which is moving relative to the
local frame, is determined with the Pythagoras equation
a^2 + b^2 = c^2. Measurements from the realm of matter are
squared and thus elevated to the realm of light-time-gravity so
that they can be properly added (in this case). The square root
of the result returns it to the realm of matter.

The 80 second time shortfall difference between the aphelion and
perihelion radii was determined assuming that time measurements
can be determined as they are in the realm of matter, which is
wrong. Converting the time measurements to the realm of matter
by taking the square root of the aphelion radius and dividing it
by the speed of light and subtracting from it, the square root
of the perihelion radius divided by the speed of light, results
in a time shortfall equivalent in the realm of matter of 2.98
seconds. With the average radial velocity set at 5000 m/sec;
5000 * 2.98 * 2 = 29800 meters is the advance per orbit cycle,
which is 44 arcseconds per century.

The gravity anisotropy adds around .02 arcseconds to that result.

Directly comparing anything to do with light, time or gravity
within the realm of matter cannot give a proper result unless
the square root of each component is taken prior to the
comparison.

I set up a program based on the above which indexed around the
orbit in 1 degree increments. The final advance for the complete
orbit was 28787 meters per orbit, which is 42.46 arcseconds per
century (42.48 including a gravity anisotropy).
----------

Mercury's perihelion advance within the Sun-Mercury closed
gravitating system indicates that the system is not entirely
elastic. If the varying time delay is the cause, it will also
account for the lack of elasticity in each closed gravitating
system formed between the Sun and every individual component
of matter in the universe. The average elasticity in all
Sun-universe systems is .36%, as is demonstrated at
http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/darkmatr.html

-----

Max Keon

Ads
  #2  
Old October 27th 08, 01:38 AM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
eric gisse
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 342
Default Perihelion Advance of Mercury.

On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 17:07:30 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

[...]

All those attempts to discuss an orbit and the most detailed math that
appears is Pythagoreas. Find a new hobby.
  #3  
Old October 27th 08, 01:52 AM posted to sci.astro
John Polasek
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 95
Default Perihelion Advance of Mercury.

On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 17:07:30 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

The post is duplicated at this address.
http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/sun-merc.html
--------

Perihelion Advance Of Mercury.


The 80 second time shortfall difference between the aphelion and
perihelion radii was determined assuming that time measurements
can be determined as they are in the realm of matter, which is
wrong. Converting the time measurements to the realm of matter
by taking the square root of the aphelion radius and dividing it
by the speed of light and subtracting from it, the square root
of the perihelion radius divided by the speed of light, results
in a time shortfall equivalent in the realm of matter of 2.98
seconds.


The units seem wrong: sqrt(meters)/c = seconds?

With the average radial velocity set at 5000 m/sec;
5000 * 2.98 * 2 = 29800 meters is the advance per orbit cycle,
which is 44 arcseconds per century.

e. The average elasticity in all
Sun-universe systems is .36%, as is demonstrated at
http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/darkmatr.html

----

Max Keon

John Polasek
  #5  
Old October 27th 08, 12:28 PM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
Robert J. Kolker[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 51
Default Perihelion Advance of Mercury.

wrote:
The post is duplicated at this address.
http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/sun-merc.html
--------

Perihelion Advance Of Mercury.

In the Sun-Mercury closed gravitating system, from the viewpoint
of the Sun, Mercury is oscillating back and forth, and from the
viewpoint of Mercury it's the Sun that's oscillating back and
forth. Beyond that, there is nothing else of any consequence
within that system. Mercury's orbit trajectory is determined
entirely from within that closed system.


Not a closed system. Jupiter perturbes the orbid of Mercury.

Bob Kolker
  #6  
Old October 28th 08, 10:13 AM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
tadchem[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 235
Default Perihelion Advance of Mercury.

On Oct 27, 7:28*am, "Robert J. Kolker" wrote:
wrote:
*The post is duplicated at this address.
*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/sun-merc.html
*--------


*Perihelion Advance Of Mercury.


In the Sun-Mercury closed gravitating system, from the viewpoint
of the Sun, Mercury is oscillating back and forth, and from the
viewpoint of Mercury it's the Sun that's oscillating back and
forth. Beyond that, there is nothing else of any consequence
within that system. Mercury's orbit trajectory is determined
entirely from within that closed system.


Not a closed system. Jupiter perturbes the orbid of Mercury.

Bob Kolker


....as do Venus, the earth, the moon, Mars, etc.

Tom Davidson
Richmond, VA
  #7  
Old October 28th 08, 06:27 PM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
Ian Parker
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,554
Default Perihelion Advance of Mercury.

On 27 Oct, 11:28, "Robert J. Kolker" wrote:
wrote:
*The post is duplicated at this address.
*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/sun-merc.html
*--------


*Perihelion Advance Of Mercury.


In the Sun-Mercury closed gravitating system, from the viewpoint
of the Sun, Mercury is oscillating back and forth, and from the
viewpoint of Mercury it's the Sun that's oscillating back and
forth. Beyond that, there is nothing else of any consequence
within that system. Mercury's orbit trajectory is determined
entirely from within that closed system.


Not a closed system. Jupiter perturbes the orbid of Mercury.

The GR correction is on top of all other perturbations. I don't know
anything about elasticity, the simple fact of the matter is that
Mercury is determined by the Scwartzchild metric, that is to say it is
attracted not to the center of the Sun but a point some distance away
- the Schwarzchild radius.

Leverrier took account of Jupiter and all the other planets, but still
the error remained.


- Ian Parker
  #8  
Old October 28th 08, 08:48 PM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
BURT
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 371
Default Perihelion Advance of Mercury.

On Oct 26, 4:07*pm, wrote:
*The post is duplicated at this address.
*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/sun-merc.html
*--------

*Perihelion Advance Of Mercury.

In the Sun-Mercury closed gravitating system, from the viewpoint
of the Sun, Mercury is oscillating back and forth, and from the
viewpoint of Mercury it's the Sun that's oscillating back and
forth. Beyond that, there is nothing else of any consequence
within that system. Mercury's orbit trajectory is determined
entirely from within that closed system.

*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/orbit1.gif

The Sun is 5555556 times the mass of Mercury, and Mercury's orbit
eccentricity from aphelion to perihelion is 2.4E+10 meters, so
the Sun will oscillate over only 4320 meters.

When a change in the force of gravity is rapidly introduced into
the system, i.e. during the fall or rise between the aphelion
and perihelion, the change is necessarily directly added to or
subtracted from the normal Newtonian gravity rate and the
consequence will be as per diagrams.

*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc2.jpg

But that has nothing to do with the gravity anisotropy generated
by Mercury's motion to and from the Sun, _which has slowly
evolved to its current state over millions of years._

In the next diagram, the oscillatory motion of an object moving
along the trajectory of the yellow line has been well
established, and the straight line represents the plane where
all forces will be zero. In order to halt the downward motion at
point 1 and send it back to intersect with the line at point 2,
a constant force is applied for the duration of the journey
between points 1 and 2. The same applies for the journey between
points 2 and 3, but the force direction is reversed. There's no
other way the system could function. And it's permanently
sustainable so long as the forces remain.

*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc6.jpg

The force directions are exactly the same as those for the
gravity anisotropy generated by Mercury's radial velocity
relative to the Sun. In that case they act at 90 degrees to the
line between the aphelion and perihelion. It's also exactly the
same system as that for Mercury's natural elliptical orbit, where
the forces are applied along the line through the aphelion and
perihelion (not shown).

*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc5.jpg

When the straight line graph is converted to an elliptical orbit,
the forces all point in the same direction relative to the
universe.

*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc8.jpg

This diagram was generated using the true anisotropy which is
added to the Newtonian gravity rate. It's totally unsustainable
and has nothing whatever to do with the gravity anisotropy.

*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc4.jpg
*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc7.jpg

This is the only thing of consequence resulting from the
anisotropy. The Sun and Mercury oscillate back and forth as
though they are connected by some invisible spring.

*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/orbit2.gif

The eccentricity in that system is around .00048 that of the
natural orbit system.

Since both systems function in exactly the same way, they will
proportionally play the same role in determining the rate of
perihelion advance, if there is a role to play.

The only apparent in-elasticity in each system is through
variations in the time delay in the gravity link between the Sun
and Mercury. At the perihelion of Mercury's orbit, the delay in
its relationship with the Sun is (perihelion radius divided by
the speed of light) = 153 seconds. By the time it has reached
its aphelion the delay has become 233 seconds. It has lost an
additional 80 seconds in its relationship with the Sun.

The time delay has some consequence. It will cause Mercury's
natural trajectory to point further away from the Sun enroute to
the aphelion because centrifugal force is unaffected by gravity,
while centripetal force has been reduced over the increasing
delay time as Mercury moves further away from the Sun. Mercury
would be traveling faster toward the aphelion than normally
expected. Enroute to the perihelion, the relationship between
the Sun and Mercury has gained an additional 80 seconds. Radial
velocity will again increase asymmetrically compared with a
naturally flowing orbit.

Any deviation from the natural flow of a stable elliptical orbit
will have gyroscopic consequences that will manifest themselves
at 90 degrees to the change direction. The initial asymmetric
force direction is not where the force has been counteracted.
That is always advanced by 90 degrees. On average, the asymmetric
force is geared toward directly advancing Mercury's orbit
ellipse.

If the average radial velocity is around 5000 m/sec (it's more),
multiplying that by 80 * 2 seconds for the complete orbit gives
a 800000 meter advance for each orbit cycle, which is far too
much. But the story doesn't end there.

The time delay in the gravity link between the Sun and Mercury
is measured in the realm of light-time-gravity, where all linear
measurements involve the dual planes of dimension perpendicular
to the line along which the measurement is taken. But such a line
doesn't exist in that realm because every measurement involves
all dimensions.

The hypotenuse length of the imaginary right angle triangle
scribed in space by a light ray emerging perpendicular to the
line of motion, from a source which is moving relative to the
local frame, is determined with the Pythagoras equation
*a^2 + b^2 = c^2. Measurements from the realm of matter are
squared and thus elevated to the realm of light-time-gravity so
that they can be properly added (in this case). The square root
of the result returns it to the realm of matter.

The 80 second time shortfall difference between the aphelion and
perihelion radii was determined assuming that time measurements
can be determined as they are in the realm of matter, which is
wrong. Converting the time measurements to the realm of matter
by taking the square root of the aphelion radius and dividing it
by the speed of light and subtracting from it, the square root
of the perihelion radius divided by the speed of light, results
in a time shortfall equivalent in the realm of matter of 2.98
seconds. With the average radial velocity set at 5000 m/sec;
*5000 * 2.98 * 2 = 29800 meters is the advance per orbit cycle,
which is 44 arcseconds per century.

The gravity anisotropy adds around .02 arcseconds to that result.

Directly comparing anything to do with light, time or gravity
within the realm of matter cannot give a proper result unless
the square root of each component is taken prior to the
comparison.

I set up a program based on the above which indexed around the
orbit in 1 degree increments. The final advance for the complete
orbit was 28787 meters per orbit, which is 42.46 arcseconds per
century (42.48 including a gravity anisotropy).
----------

Mercury's perihelion advance within the Sun-Mercury closed
gravitating system indicates that the system is not entirely
elastic. If the varying time delay is the cause, it will also
account for the lack of elasticity in each closed gravitating
system formed between the Sun and every individual component
of matter in the universe. The average elasticity in all
Sun-universe systems is .36%, as is demonstrated at
*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/darkmatr.html

-----

Max Keon


I believe it is a "fall short" rather than an advance.

Mitch Raemsch
  #9  
Old October 29th 08, 12:39 AM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 43
Default Perihelion Advance of Mercury.

On Oct 28, 8:13*pm, tadchem wrote:
On Oct 27, 7:28am, "Robert J. Kolker" wrote:
wrote:
The post is duplicated at this address.
http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/sun-merc.html
--------

Perihelion Advance Of Mercury.

In the Sun-Mercury closed gravitating system, from the viewpoint
of the Sun, Mercury is oscillating back and forth, and from the
viewpoint of Mercury it's the Sun that's oscillating back and
forth. Beyond that, there is nothing else of any consequence
within that system. Mercury's orbit trajectory is determined
entirely from within that closed system.


Not a closed system. Jupiter perturbes the orbid of Mercury.

Bob Kolker


...as do Venus, the earth, the moon, Mars, etc.


As does every other clump of matter in the universe. And every
single one of them forms an individual closed gravitating system
with Mercury. The same applies for every individual clump of
matter in the universe, where every other clump of matter in the
universe forms a closed gravitating system with it.

Why do you think that so strange?

Now that you understand all that, perhaps you're ready to visit
http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/darkmatr.html
which is fundamentally related to this subject. It has been
updated, because it contained an error and to make it easier to
follow.

-----

Max Keon

  #10  
Old October 29th 08, 02:06 AM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
tadchem[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 235
Default Perihelion Advance of Mercury.

On Oct 28, 3:48*pm, BURT wrote:
On Oct 26, 4:07*pm, wrote:



*The post is duplicated at this address.
*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/sun-merc.html
*--------


*Perihelion Advance Of Mercury.


In the Sun-Mercury closed gravitating system, from the viewpoint
of the Sun, Mercury is oscillating back and forth, and from the
viewpoint of Mercury it's the Sun that's oscillating back and
forth. Beyond that, there is nothing else of any consequence
within that system. Mercury's orbit trajectory is determined
entirely from within that closed system.


*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/orbit1.gif


The Sun is 5555556 times the mass of Mercury, and Mercury's orbit
eccentricity from aphelion to perihelion is 2.4E+10 meters, so
the Sun will oscillate over only 4320 meters.


When a change in the force of gravity is rapidly introduced into
the system, i.e. during the fall or rise between the aphelion
and perihelion, the change is necessarily directly added to or
subtracted from the normal Newtonian gravity rate and the
consequence will be as per diagrams.


*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc2.jpg


But that has nothing to do with the gravity anisotropy generated
by Mercury's motion to and from the Sun, _which has slowly
evolved to its current state over millions of years._


In the next diagram, the oscillatory motion of an object moving
along the trajectory of the yellow line has been well
established, and the straight line represents the plane where
all forces will be zero. In order to halt the downward motion at
point 1 and send it back to intersect with the line at point 2,
a constant force is applied for the duration of the journey
between points 1 and 2. The same applies for the journey between
points 2 and 3, but the force direction is reversed. There's no
other way the system could function. And it's permanently
sustainable so long as the forces remain.


*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc6.jpg


The force directions are exactly the same as those for the
gravity anisotropy generated by Mercury's radial velocity
relative to the Sun. In that case they act at 90 degrees to the
line between the aphelion and perihelion. It's also exactly the
same system as that for Mercury's natural elliptical orbit, where
the forces are applied along the line through the aphelion and
perihelion (not shown).


*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc5.jpg


When the straight line graph is converted to an elliptical orbit,
the forces all point in the same direction relative to the
universe.


*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc8.jpg


This diagram was generated using the true anisotropy which is
added to the Newtonian gravity rate. It's totally unsustainable
and has nothing whatever to do with the gravity anisotropy.


*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc4.jpg
*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/merc7.jpg


This is the only thing of consequence resulting from the
anisotropy. The Sun and Mercury oscillate back and forth as
though they are connected by some invisible spring.


*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/orbit2.gif


The eccentricity in that system is around .00048 that of the
natural orbit system.


Since both systems function in exactly the same way, they will
proportionally play the same role in determining the rate of
perihelion advance, if there is a role to play.


The only apparent in-elasticity in each system is through
variations in the time delay in the gravity link between the Sun
and Mercury. At the perihelion of Mercury's orbit, the delay in
its relationship with the Sun is (perihelion radius divided by
the speed of light) = 153 seconds. By the time it has reached
its aphelion the delay has become 233 seconds. It has lost an
additional 80 seconds in its relationship with the Sun.


The time delay has some consequence. It will cause Mercury's
natural trajectory to point further away from the Sun enroute to
the aphelion because centrifugal force is unaffected by gravity,
while centripetal force has been reduced over the increasing
delay time as Mercury moves further away from the Sun. Mercury
would be traveling faster toward the aphelion than normally
expected. Enroute to the perihelion, the relationship between
the Sun and Mercury has gained an additional 80 seconds. Radial
velocity will again increase asymmetrically compared with a
naturally flowing orbit.


Any deviation from the natural flow of a stable elliptical orbit
will have gyroscopic consequences that will manifest themselves
at 90 degrees to the change direction. The initial asymmetric
force direction is not where the force has been counteracted.
That is always advanced by 90 degrees. On average, the asymmetric
force is geared toward directly advancing Mercury's orbit
ellipse.


If the average radial velocity is around 5000 m/sec (it's more),
multiplying that by 80 * 2 seconds for the complete orbit gives
a 800000 meter advance for each orbit cycle, which is far too
much. But the story doesn't end there.


The time delay in the gravity link between the Sun and Mercury
is measured in the realm of light-time-gravity, where all linear
measurements involve the dual planes of dimension perpendicular
to the line along which the measurement is taken. But such a line
doesn't exist in that realm because every measurement involves
all dimensions.


The hypotenuse length of the imaginary right angle triangle
scribed in space by a light ray emerging perpendicular to the
line of motion, from a source which is moving relative to the
local frame, is determined with the Pythagoras equation
*a^2 + b^2 = c^2. Measurements from the realm of matter are
squared and thus elevated to the realm of light-time-gravity so
that they can be properly added (in this case). The square root
of the result returns it to the realm of matter.


The 80 second time shortfall difference between the aphelion and
perihelion radii was determined assuming that time measurements
can be determined as they are in the realm of matter, which is
wrong. Converting the time measurements to the realm of matter
by taking the square root of the aphelion radius and dividing it
by the speed of light and subtracting from it, the square root
of the perihelion radius divided by the speed of light, results
in a time shortfall equivalent in the realm of matter of 2.98
seconds. With the average radial velocity set at 5000 m/sec;
*5000 * 2.98 * 2 = 29800 meters is the advance per orbit cycle,
which is 44 arcseconds per century.


The gravity anisotropy adds around .02 arcseconds to that result.


Directly comparing anything to do with light, time or gravity
within the realm of matter cannot give a proper result unless
the square root of each component is taken prior to the
comparison.


I set up a program based on the above which indexed around the
orbit in 1 degree increments. The final advance for the complete
orbit was 28787 meters per orbit, which is 42.46 arcseconds per
century (42.48 including a gravity anisotropy).
----------


Mercury's perihelion advance within the Sun-Mercury closed
gravitating system indicates that the system is not entirely
elastic. If the varying time delay is the cause, it will also
account for the lack of elasticity in each closed gravitating
system formed between the Sun and every individual component
of matter in the universe. The average elasticity in all
Sun-universe systems is .36%, as is demonstrated at
*http://members.optusnet.com.au/maxkeon/darkmatr.html


-----


Max Keon


I believe it is a "fall short" rather than an advance.

Mitch Raemsch


After allowing for the secular perturbations due to ALL the planets,
the perihelion of mercury shows an advance (moving forwards) of 42.8
arc-seconds per century. Newtonian gravitation cannot account for
this.

It is OBSERVED to be an advance, so your "belief" that it is a "fall
short" is contradicted by empirical observation.

Get real.

Tom Davidson
Richmond, VA
 




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Happy Perihelion Day Mike Dworetsky UK Astronomy 10 January 8th 04 06:44 PM


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