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recovered F-1 engines - which mission?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 22nd 13, 01:44 AM posted to sci.space.history
Jan Philips
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Posts: 54
Default recovered F-1 engines - which mission?

Which mission are the recovered F-1 engines from? Most reports say
that they are from Apollo 11, but some say that they don't know
because the serial numbers are missing or only partial. Some people
seem to automatically think that Apollo 11 was the only one.
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  #2  
Old March 22nd 13, 01:37 PM posted to sci.space.history
Greg \(Strider\) Moore
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Posts: 790
Default recovered F-1 engines - which mission?

"Jan Philips" wrote in message
...

Which mission are the recovered F-1 engines from? Most reports say
that they are from Apollo 11, but some say that they don't know
because the serial numbers are missing or only partial. Some people
seem to automatically think that Apollo 11 was the only one.


Well, the GOAL was the Apollo 11 S-V. Hence in part why I think many folks
are saying these are them.

That said, I suspect it'll be a bit (days or weeks) before anything is
confirmed.




--
Greg D. Moore http://greenmountainsoftware.wordpress.com/
CEO QuiCR: Quick, Crowdsourced Responses. http://www.quicr.net

  #3  
Old March 25th 13, 12:38 AM posted to sci.space.history
Jan Philips
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Posts: 54
Default recovered F-1 engines - which mission?

On Fri, 22 Mar 2013 09:37:25 -0400, "Greg \(Strider\) Moore"
wrote:

Well, the GOAL was the Apollo 11 S-V. Hence in part why I think many folks
are saying these are them.

That said, I suspect it'll be a bit (days or weeks) before anything is
confirmed.


Could they tell from the location?
  #4  
Old March 25th 13, 01:07 AM posted to sci.space.history
Bob Haller
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Posts: 3,197
Default recovered F-1 engines - which mission?

On Mar 24, 8:38*pm, Jan Philips wrote:
On Fri, 22 Mar 2013 09:37:25 -0400, "Greg \(Strider\) Moore"

wrote:
Well, the GOAL was the Apollo 11 S-V. *Hence in part why I think many folks
are saying these are them.


That said, I suspect it'll be a bit (days or weeks) before anything is
confirmed.


Could they tell from the location?


Not EXACTLY, the area is littered with all sorts of debris from a
lifetime of launches.

in some form everything must be there, they know what it looks like,
the serial numbers are in the archives, cleaning and confirming serial
numbers take time
  #5  
Old March 25th 13, 01:48 AM posted to sci.space.history
Jan Philips
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Posts: 54
Default recovered F-1 engines - which mission?

On Sun, 24 Mar 2013 18:07:50 -0700 (PDT), bob haller
wrote:

Could they tell from the location?


Not EXACTLY, the area is littered with all sorts of debris from a
lifetime of launches.


Yes, but we are talking only about Saturn F-1s. Is the location of
where each SI-C went down known accurately enough to tell which ones
have been found?
  #6  
Old March 25th 13, 02:12 AM posted to sci.space.history
Greg \(Strider\) Moore
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Posts: 790
Default recovered F-1 engines - which mission?


"Jan Philips" wrote in message
.. .

On Sun, 24 Mar 2013 18:07:50 -0700 (PDT), bob haller
wrote:

Could they tell from the location?


Not EXACTLY, the area is littered with all sorts of debris from a
lifetime of launches.


Yes, but we are talking only about Saturn F-1s. Is the location of
where each SI-C went down known accurately enough to tell which ones
have been found?


A 30 second search shows Apollo 15 was launched more southerly than previous
launches.

And since the launch depended on where the Moon was in its orbit I have to
guess there's some variation (on the scale of miles) between where the
impact points were, but I don't know how much stuff might drift and how
accurately the impact spot was tracked.




--
Greg D. Moore http://greenmountainsoftware.wordpress.com/
CEO QuiCR: Quick, Crowdsourced Responses. http://www.quicr.net

  #7  
Old March 25th 13, 07:52 AM posted to sci.space.history
Bob Haller
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Posts: 3,197
Default recovered F-1 engines - which mission?

On Mar 24, 10:12*pm, "Greg \(Strider\) Moore"
wrote:
"Jan Philips" *wrote in message
.. .


On Sun, 24 Mar 2013 18:07:50 -0700 (PDT), bob haller
wrote:


Could they tell from the location?


Not EXACTLY, the area is littered with all sorts of debris from a
lifetime of launches.


Yes, but we are talking only about Saturn F-1s. *Is the location of
where each SI-C went down known accurately enough to tell which ones
have been found?


A 30 second search shows Apollo 15 was launched more southerly than previous
launches.

And since the launch depended on where the Moon was in its orbit I have to
guess there's some variation (on the scale of miles) between where the
impact points were, but I don't know how much stuff might drift and how
accurately the impact spot was tracked.



--
Greg D. Moore * * * * * * * * *http://greenmountainsoftware.wordpress.com/
CEO QuiCR: Quick, Crowdsourced Responses.http://www.quicr.net


theres a pretty photo of one of the stages impacting the ocean in a
rather spectacular fashion, taken by a fishing boat that probabky
shouldnt of been there
  #8  
Old March 25th 13, 11:44 AM posted to sci.space.history
GordonD
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Posts: 151
Default recovered F-1 engines - which mission?

"Greg (Strider) Moore" wrote in message
m...

"Jan Philips" wrote in message
. ..

On Sun, 24 Mar 2013 18:07:50 -0700 (PDT), bob haller
wrote:

Could they tell from the location?

Not EXACTLY, the area is littered with all sorts of debris from a
lifetime of launches.


Yes, but we are talking only about Saturn F-1s. Is the location of
where each SI-C went down known accurately enough to tell which ones
have been found?


A 30 second search shows Apollo 15 was launched more southerly than
previous launches.

And since the launch depended on where the Moon was in its orbit I have to
guess there's some variation (on the scale of miles) between where the
impact points were, but I don't know how much stuff might drift and how
accurately the impact spot was tracked.



"Apollo - The Definitive Sourcebook" by Rich Orloff and David Harland has
the impact points. For instance Apollo 10's S-IC was 30.188 deg N, 74.207
deg W while Apollo 11's was 30.212N, 74.038W. I don't know how big an area a
location to that accuracy would cover.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland

"Slipped the surly bonds of Earth...to touch the face of God."

  #9  
Old March 25th 13, 02:57 PM posted to sci.space.history
Dean
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Posts: 323
Default recovered F-1 engines - which mission?

On Monday, March 25, 2013 3:52:44 AM UTC-4, bob haller wrote:
On Mar 24, 10:12*pm, "Greg \(Strider\) Moore"

wrote:

"Jan Philips" *wrote in message


.. .




On Sun, 24 Mar 2013 18:07:50 -0700 (PDT), bob haller


wrote:




Could they tell from the location?




Not EXACTLY, the area is littered with all sorts of debris from a


lifetime of launches.




Yes, but we are talking only about Saturn F-1s. *Is the location of


where each SI-C went down known accurately enough to tell which ones


have been found?




A 30 second search shows Apollo 15 was launched more southerly than previous


launches.




And since the launch depended on where the Moon was in its orbit I have to


guess there's some variation (on the scale of miles) between where the


impact points were, but I don't know how much stuff might drift and how


accurately the impact spot was tracked.








--


Greg D. Moore * * * * * * * * *http://greenmountainsoftware.wordpress.com/


CEO QuiCR: Quick, Crowdsourced Responses.http://www.quicr.net




theres a pretty photo of one of the stages impacting the ocean in a

rather spectacular fashion, taken by a fishing boat that probabky

shouldnt of been there


Where might this picture be?
  #10  
Old March 25th 13, 11:35 PM posted to sci.space.history
Jan Philips
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Posts: 54
Default recovered F-1 engines - which mission?

On Mon, 25 Mar 2013 11:44:53 -0000, "GordonD"
wrote:

"Apollo - The Definitive Sourcebook" by Rich Orloff and David Harland has
the impact points. For instance Apollo 10's S-IC was 30.188 deg N, 74.207
deg W while Apollo 11's was 30.212N, 74.038W. I don't know how big an area a
location to that accuracy would cover.


Those are pretty accurate locations. At the equator, 0.001 degree is
about 100 meters, and it is less than that at those locations - if
they are rounded properly and not converted from less-accurate minutes
and seconds.
 




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