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Moving Hubble close to the ISS.



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 24th 04, 12:53 AM
MarkMcDonald
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Default Moving Hubble close to the ISS.

Hubble is orbiting with a perigee of 584km and an apogee of 618km.

Would it still function if it was manouvred into an orbit matching that of
the ISS (perigee 361km apogee 437km) and parked 100 metres away from it?

It would make servicing it a lot cheaper because the two missions (resupply
of ISS and servicing of Hubble) could be combined.

M.M.

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  #2  
Old January 24th 04, 03:50 AM
Jim Kingdon
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Default Moving Hubble close to the ISS.

Would it still function if it was manouvred into an orbit matching that of
the ISS (perigee 361km apogee 437km) and parked 100 metres away from it?


It would require more frequent reboosts, so it might want to spend
some of its time a bit higher, but especially if it had its own
propulsion added, this wouldn't really be a problem.

It would make servicing it a lot cheaper because the two missions
(resupply of ISS and servicing of Hubble) could be combined.


Not exactly. Limits on crew time and upmass would still apply, so you
wouldn't necessarily get resupply/servicing "for free".

But it would mean that the shuttle could dock with ISS for tile
inspection and possibly emergency shelter. In the post-Columbia
environment, that's a very big consideration.

See http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=10083 for one blurb
about robotic reboosting of Hubble. Whether this happens is very much
to be determined.

(I sort of like the idea which is floating around to build a new space
telescope incorporating one or both of the Hubble instruments which
would have been on the cancelled servicing mission. But how
practical/affordable *that* will be is also very much to be
determined).

  #3  
Old January 24th 04, 03:59 AM
Rand Simberg
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Default Moving Hubble close to the ISS.

On Fri, 23 Jan 2004 19:50:50 -0800 (PST), in a place far, far away,
Jim Kingdon made the phosphor on my monitor glow
in such a way as to indicate that:

Would it still function if it was manouvred into an orbit matching that of
the ISS (perigee 361km apogee 437km) and parked 100 metres away from it?


It would require more frequent reboosts, so it might want to spend
some of its time a bit higher, but especially if it had its own
propulsion added, this wouldn't really be a problem.


The problem with it not being at the same altitude is that the
relative nodes will drift, putting it into a different orbital plane
over time. I suspect that its drag coefficient is less than ISS'.

  #4  
Old January 24th 04, 11:54 PM
Engr Bohn
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Default Moving Hubble close to the ISS.

Good morning,

Hail, MarkMcDonald! We who are about to post salute you.

Hubble is orbiting with a perigee of 584km and an apogee of 618km.

Would it still function if it was manouvred into an orbit matching
that of the ISS (perigee 361km apogee 437km) and parked 100 metres
away from it?

It would make servicing it a lot cheaper because the two missions
(resupply of ISS and servicing of Hubble) could be combined.


I note that HST controls orientation using reaction wheels. This is so
that residue from attitude control jets' exhaust doesn't affect the
imagery (and perhaps to prevent damage to the optics?). ISS' attidue
control and orbit boosting are managed using rocket motors fed
monomethyl hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide.

Keeping ISS near a steady source of rocket exhaust would defeat the
point of those reaction wheels. OTOH, so would reentry...


Take care,
cb

--
Christopher A. Bohn ____________|____________
http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/~bohn/ ' ** ** " (o) " ** ** '
24 January 1946 -- Gen Carl Spaatz named the first chief of staff
of the Army Air Forces.

  #5  
Old January 27th 04, 12:41 PM
test
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Default Moving Hubble close to the ISS.

hmm....how about making the thing a new(old) module of the Iss?
Then it would at least be servicable from the Iss...

Regards
VGA

"MarkMcDonald" wrote in message
...
Hubble is orbiting with a perigee of 584km and an apogee of 618km.

Would it still function if it was manouvred into an orbit matching that of
the ISS (perigee 361km apogee 437km) and parked 100 metres away from it?

It would make servicing it a lot cheaper because the two missions

(resupply
of ISS and servicing of Hubble) could be combined.

M.M.


 




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