A Space & astronomy forum. SpaceBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » SpaceBanter.com forum » Astronomy and Astrophysics » Hubble
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Daily Report



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old December 22nd 08, 06:17 PM posted to sci.astro.hubble
Cooper, Joe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 568
Default Daily Report

HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE - Continuing to collect World Class Science

DAILY REPORT****** #4761

PERIOD COVERED: 5am December 19 - 5am December 22, 2008 (DOY
************************** 354/1000z-357/1000z)

OBSERVATIONS SCHEDULED

WFPC2 11962

A New Supernova in the Antennae; Narrowing in on the Hubble Constant
and Dark Energy

A measurement of the Hubble constant to a precision of a few percent
would be a powerful aid to the investigation of the nature of dark
energy and a potent "end-to-end" test of the present cosmological
model. In Cycle 15 we constructed a new, streamlined distance ladder
utilizing high-quality type Ia supernova data and observations of
Cepheids with HST in the near-IR to minimize the dominant sources of
systematic uncertainty in past measurements of the Hubble constant and
reduce its total uncertainty to a little under 5%. Here we propose to
exploit this new route with a rare opportunity to begin reducing the
remaining uncertainty. SN 2007sr in the Antennae (NGC 4038/9) is the
rare SN Ia which is suitable for increasing the precision of small
calibration sample of SNe Ia. Even rarer is that it is close enough
that it's Cepheids are within range of observing with WFPC2 (and
NICMOS, should it return to life). But we need to act fast as the
window of long visibility and fixed orient runs from mid-early
December 2008 to early March 2009. We request 34 orbits with WFPC2 to
find the Cepheids in the SN host. We also request 16 orbits to observe
the Cepheids we find with Camera 2, F160W if NICMOS becomes available
by April 2009 . (If NICMOS does not return we would forgo these
observations and ask the TTRB to let us make them with our own WFC3-IR
allocation, though we much prefer the smaller pixel size of NIC2).

FGS 11945

Asteroseismology of Extrasolar Planet Host Stars

Detections of stellar oscillations, although a very demanding task in
terms of observing time, offers a return of more accurate knowledge
about the structure of stars than can be obtained in any other way. In
particular, detecting the 10-15 highest amplitude modes in solar-like
stars to signal-to-noise of just a few sigma each allows robust
constraints on the stellar density to 1%, and the stellar age to
within 5-10% of its main sequence lifetime. Ten day observing runs
using the FGS as a photometer on any of the 5 best transiting planet
systems would enable these asteroseismology returns. From more
precisely observed transit shapes than can be obtained from the ground
a completely independent constraint on stellar density to ~1% can be
obtained. The long observation sets required for asteroseismology also
provide an excellent opportunity of detecting transits from other
planets, e.g. hypothesized inner -orbit Hot Earths, should any exist.

WFPC2 11944

Binaries at the Extremes of the H-R Diagram

We propose to use HST/Fine Guidance Sensor 1r to survey for binaries
among some of the most massive, least massive, and oldest stars in our
part of the Galaxy. FGS allows us to spatially resolve binary systems
that are too faint to observe using ground-based, speckle or optical
long baseline interferometry, and too close to resolve with AO. We
propose a SNAP-style program of single orbit FGS TRANS mode
observations of very massive stars in the cluster NGC 3603, luminous
blue variables, nearby low mass main sequence stars, cool subdwarf
stars, and white dwarfs. These observations will help us to (1)
identify systems suitable for follow up studies for mass
determination, (2) study the role of binaries in stellar birth and in
advanced evolutionary states, (3) explore the fundamental properties
of stars near the main sequence-brown dwarf boundary, (4) understand
the role of binaries for X-ray bright systems, (5) find binaries among
ancient and nearby subdwarf stars, and (6) help calibrate the white
dwarf mass - radius relation.

FGS 11943

Binaries at the Extremes of the H-R Diagram

We propose to use HST/Fine Guidance Sensor 1r to survey for binaries
among some of the most massive, least massive, and oldest stars in our
part of the Galaxy. FGS allows us to spatially resolve binary systems
that are too faint for ground-based, speckle or optical long baseline
interferometry, and too close to resolve with AO. We propose a
SNAP-style program of single orbit FGS TRANS mode observations of very
massive stars in the cluster NGC 3603, luminous blue variables, nearby
low mass main sequence stars, cool subdwarf stars, and white dwarfs.
These observations will help us to (1) identify systems suitable for
follow up studies for mass determination, (2) study the role of
binaries in stellar birth and in advanced evolutionary states, (3)
explore the fundamental properties of stars near the main
sequence-brown dwarf boundary, (4) understand the role of binaries for
X-ray bright systems, (5) find binaries among ancient and nearby
subdwarf stars, and (6) help calibrate the white dwarf mass - radius
relation.

FGS 11870

Calibrating FGS1R's Optical Field Angle Distortion (OFAD), Second
Epoch

This proposal gathers the data needed to calibrate the optical field
angle distortions in FGS1r to the level of accuracy required for
astrometry science. Selected stars from the galactic cluster M35 are
repeatedly observed in POSITION mode by FGS1r with F583W filter at a
variety of spacecraft pointings and telescope roll angles. Ideally the
observations are to occur at a time when this ecliptic star field is
near the anti-sun direction so that HST's roll angle is unconstrained.
Unfortunately this is not possible under two gyro operations.
Therefore, the observations in this proposal are somewhat very
constrained in roll. However, this test should suffice as an adequate
update to the original FGS1r OFAD that executed in December 2000. For
each visit, the desired telescope pointing is specified by POS TARG
and ORIENT special requirements.

FGS 11704

The Ages of Globular Clusters and the Population II Distance Scale

Globular clusters are the oldest objects in the universe whose age can
be accurately determined. The dominant error in globular cluster age
determinations is the uncertain Population II distance scale. We
propose to use FGS 1r to obtain parallaxes with an accuracy of 0.2
milliarcsecond for 9 main sequence stars with [Fe/H] -1.5. This will
determine the absolute magnitude of these stars with accuracies of
0.04 to 0.06mag. This data will be used to determine the distance to
24 metal-poor globular clusters using main sequence fitting. These
distances (with errors of 0.05 mag) will be used to determine the ages
of globular clusters using the luminosity of the subgiant branch as an
age indicator. This will yield absolute ages with an accuracy 5%,
about a factor of two improvement over current estimates. Coupled with
existing parallaxes for more metal-rich stars, we will be able to
accurately determine the age for globular clusters over a wide range
of metallicities in order to study the early formation history of the
Milky Way and provide an independent estimate of the age of the universe.

The Hipparcos database contains only 1 star with [Fe/H] -1.4 and an
absolute magnitude error less than 0.18 mag which is suitable for use
in main sequence fitting. Previous attempts at main sequence fitting
to metal-poor globular clusters have had to rely on theoretical
calibrations of the color of the main sequence. Our HST parallax
program will remove this source of possible systematic error and yield
distances to metal-poor globular clusters which are significantly more
accurate than possible with the current parallax data. The HST
parallax data will have errors which are 10 times smaller than the
current parallax data. Using the HST parallaxes, we will obtain main
sequence fitting distances to 11 globular clusters which contain over
500 RR Lyrae stars. This will allow us to calibrate the absolute
magnitude of RR Lyrae stars, a commonly used Population II distance
indicator.

WFPC2 11316

HST Cycle 16 & Pre-SM4 Optical Monitor

This is a continuation of the Cycle 15 & pre-SM4 Optical Monitor,
11020. Please see that proposal for a more complete description of the
observing strategy. The 6 visits comprising this proposal observe two
single standard stars with WFPC2/PC in order to establish overall OTA
focal length for the purposes of focus maintenance. The goal of this
monitoring before SM4 is to establish a best estimate of the OTA focus
entering SMOV.

WFPC2 11289

SL2S: The Strong Lensing Legacy Survey

Recent systematic surveys of strong galaxy-galaxy lenses {CLASS,
SLACS, GOODS, etc.} are producing spectacular results for galaxy
masses roughly below a transition mass M~10^13 Mo. The observed lens
properties and their evolution up to z~0.2, consistent with numerical
simulations, can be described by isothermal elliptical potentials. In
contrast, modeling of giant arcs in X-ray luminous clusters {halo
masses M ~10^13 Mo} favors NFW mass profiles, suggesting that dark
matter halos are not significantly affected by baryon cooling. Until
recently, lensing surveys were neither deep nor extended enough to
probe the intermediate mass density regime, which is fundamental for
understanding the assembly of structures. The CFHT Legacy Survey now
covers 125 square degrees, and thus offers a large reservoir of strong
lenses probing a large range of mass densities up to z~1. We have
extracted a list of 150 strong lenses using the most recent CFHTLS
data release via automated procedures. Following our first SNAPSHOT
proposal in cycle 15, we propose to continue the Hubble follow-up
targeting a larger list of 130 lensing candidates. These are
intermediate mass range candidates {between galaxies and clusters}
that are selected in the redshift range of 0.2-1 with no a priori
X-ray selection. The HST resolution is necessary for confirming the
lensing candidates, accurate modeling of the lenses, and probing the
total mass concentration in galaxy groups up to z~1 with the largest
unbiased sample available to date.

FGS 11213

Distances to Eclipsing M Dwarf Binaries

We propose HST FGS observations to measure accurate distances of 5
nearby M dwarf eclipsing binary systems, from which model-independent
luminosities can be calculated. These objects have either poor or no
existing parallax measurements. FGS parallax determinations for these
systems, with their existing dynamic masses determined to better than
0.5%, would serve as model-independent anchor points for the low-mass
end of the mass-luminosity diagram.

FGS 11212

Filling the Period Gap for Massive Binaries

The current census of binaries among the massive O-type stars is
seriously incomplete for systems in the period range from years to
millennia because the radial velocity variations are too small and the
angular separations too close for easy detection. Here we propose to
discover binaries in this observational gap through a Faint Guidance
Sensor SNAP survey of relatively bright targets listed in the Galactic
O Star Catalog. Our primary goal is to determine the binary frequency
among those in the cluster/association, field, and runaway groups. The
results will help us assess the role of binaries in massive star
formation and in the processes that lead to the ejection of massive
stars from their natal clusters. The program will also lead to the
identification of new, close binaries that will be targets of long
term spectroscopic and high angular resolution observations to
determine their masses and distances. The results will also be
important for the interpretation of the spectra of suspected and newly
identified binary and multiple systems.

WFPC2 11113

Binaries in the Kuiper Belt: Probes of Solar System Formation and
Evolution

The discovery of binaries in the Kuiper Belt and related small body
populations is powering a revolutionary step forward in the study of
this remote region. Three quarters of the known binaries in the Kuiper
Belt have been discovered with HST, most by our snapshot surveys. The
statistics derived from this work are beginning to yield surprising
and unexpected results. We have found a strong concentration of
binaries among low-inclination Classicals, a possible size cutoff to
binaries among the Centaurs, an apparent preference for nearly equal
mass binaries, and a strong increase in the number of binaries at
small separations. We propose to continue this successful program in
Cycle 16; we expect to discover at least 13 new binary systems,
targeted to subgroups where these discoveries can have the greatest
impact.

ACS/HRC 10877

A Snapshot Survey of the Sites of Recent, Nearby Supernovae

During the past few years, robotic {or nearly robotic} searches for
supernovae {SNe}, most notably our Lick Observatory Supernova Search
{LOSS}, have found hundreds of SNe, many of them in quite nearby
galaxies {cz 4000 km/s}. Most of the objects were discovered before
maximum brightness, and have follow-up photometry and spectroscopy;
they include some of the best-studied SNe to date. We propose to
conduct a snapshot imaging survey of the sites of some of these nearby
objects, to obtain late-time photometry that {through the shape of the
light and color curves} will help reveal the origin of their lingering
energy. The images will also provide high-resolution information on
the local environments of SNe that are far superior to what we can
procure from the ground. For example, we will obtain color-color and
color-magnitude diagrams of stars in these SN sites, to determine the
SN progenitor masses and constraints on the reddening. Recovery of the
SNe in the new HST images will also allow us to actually pinpoint
their progenitor stars in cases where pre- explosion images exist in
the HST archive. This proposal is an extension of our successful Cycle
13 snapshot survey with ACS. It is complementary to our Cycle 15
archival proposal, which is a continuation of our long-standing
program to use existing HST images to glean information about SN
environments.

FLIGHT OPERATIONS SUMMARY:

Significant Spacecraft Anomalies: (The following are preliminary
reports of potential non-nominal performance that will be
investigated.)

HSTARS:

11620 - NCC (NICMOS CRYO-COOLER) SAFED @ 354/1827z

11621 - GSAcq (2,3,2) Loss of Lock while guiding @ 356/1922

A Loss of Lock occurred on FGS 2 while guiding under FGSs 2 & 3.

Observations affected: Astrometry Proposal # 11213

COMPLETED OPS REQUEST:

18376-0 - Off-Line +BB SPA Trim Relay
18377-0 - Lower FGS-1R K16 K-factor for Proposal 11945

COMPLETED OPS NOTES: (None)

************************ SCHEDULED***** SUCCESSFUL***** FAILURE TIMES

FGS GSacq*************** 28***************** 28
FGS REacq*************** 13***************** 13
OBAD with Maneuver ***** 82***************** 82
LOSS of LOCK****************************************** 356/1922z

SIGNIFICANT EVENTS:

Flash Report: Off-Line +BB SPA Trim Relay (OR #18376) from Battery 3 @
354/17:09z - this was in preparation for the upcoming hot period from
DOY 348 until DOY 362.

Flash Report: FGS-1R K16 K-factor lowered to a value of 4982 as
preparation for 10 day Astrometry Proposal #11945 that started at
357/01:30z.


Ads
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Daily Report #4407 Pataro, Pete Hubble 0 July 19th 07 05:36 PM
Daily Report #4385 Cooper, Joe Hubble 0 June 18th 07 02:55 PM
Daily Report #4384 Pataro, Pete Hubble 0 June 15th 07 06:48 PM
Daily Report [email protected] Hubble 0 October 29th 04 04:59 PM
HST Daily Report 131 George Barbehenn Hubble 0 May 11th 04 02:48 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:01 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 SpaceBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.