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Polar sunrise time 2018



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 16th 18, 04:51 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Polar sunrise time 2018

https://www.timeanddate.com/sun/antarctica/south-pole

It is a singular event each orbit at the South Pole as a component of the great Polar day/night cycle.

The South Pole, where daily rotation is absent, turns through the circle of illumination and the Sun comes into view for the first time in 6 months. The surface rotation parallel to the orbital plane actually occurs for the entire surface of the planet so where the daily cycle meshes with the annual cycle ,we experience this as the seasons.
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  #2  
Old September 17th 18, 07:55 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Polar sunrise time 2018

https://www.usap.gov/videoclipsandmaps/spwebcam.cfm

https://www.timeanddate.com/sun/antarctica/south-pole


The measure of a person in astronomical affairs, at least when it comes to the seasons, is the inspiring nature of two distinct types of sunrise on September 21st from distinct rotational causes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okw6Mu3mxdM


The sudden appearance of the Sun on the horizon, especially when seen at the sea shore, always has an enchantment for observers as much as sunset seems to bring a close to the day with all the winding down that goes along with it. A society that loses its inspirational background into which these astronomical events are placed loses half their nature if they profess a love of astronomy in all its facets.

The world sees enough biting each day based on convictions but this isn't one, the Polar day/night cycle and its cause will remain whether people turn their faces away or not. No longer a clockwork Earth but two surface rotations working independently of each other and with their own individual traits make all life possible on this planet and it is this love alone which drives discoveries.


  #3  
Old September 22nd 18, 10:52 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Polar sunrise time 2018

What happens now after all the usual 'tilting' articles disappear is that the area and circumference where the Sun remains constantly out of sight begins to grow at the North Pole until it reaches its maximum circumference (Arctic circle) on the December Solstice. The surface rotation as a function of the orbital motion of the Earth brings about this planetary feature and with it the growth of Arctic sea ice.The particular traits are opposite at the South Pole where the area which has the Sun constantly in view expands until the December Solstice where the area is coincident with the Antarctic circle.

https://epic.gsfc.nasa.gov/

It is impossible, or so it appears, to get the space agency to represent the actual relationship of the North and South Poles to the orbital plane as presently they have the Earth with a zero degree inclination via image manipulation.


  #4  
Old September 28th 18, 10:56 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Polar sunrise time 2018

Seeing the South Pole webcam is pointed to the ground in one image and the other obscured, there are still images of the single Polar sunrise last week as the Sun comes into view for the first time in 6 months -

https://www.noaa.gov/stories/feature...ival-of-spring

For the life of me I don't know why people oppose the surface rotation responsible for the Polar day/night cycle and ultimately, when it combines with daily rotation at habitable latitudes, causes the change in the seasons.

It is something to celebrate as this cycle has been going on as long as the daily rotation of the Earth.
  #5  
Old October 2nd 18, 08:51 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Polar sunrise time 2018

Obviously the glare of the Sun is the reason they have turned the camera to the ground as it is low to the horizon presently after Polar sunrise a few weeks ago -

https://www.usap.gov/videoclipsandmaps/spwebcam.cfm

The Sun also stays in view constantly, weather permitting, as per the Polar day/night cycle so only next March on the Equinox will the description change -

https://www.timeanddate.com/sun/antarctica/south-pole


Let the theorists chant away about their own concerns, researching the new approach to the seasons via the Polar day/night cycle and its rotational cause should entertain those who are interested in climate or indeed the human rhythm of the annual cycle in addition to the cicadian rhythm of the daily cycle.

The Western islands of Europe celebrated the annual cycle in terms of the light half/dark half of the year as May 1st and November 1st respectively but while Ireland retained the context of Samhain/Bealtaine, the English only retained May Day due to the intervention of Cromwell or shifted their ancient marker of Halloween for the dark half of the year to the political Guy Fawkes night -

https://www.historic-uk.com/CultureU...-Celebrations/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guy_Fawkes_Night


No doubt the empiricists will take satisfaction how an ancient festival signifying an annual cycle was politicised or obscured but as the darkness draws in, days get cooler and nature goes dormant before the eyes of people, the natural decay which has a sadness to it is lost until nature springs back to life in 6 months and with it the spirit of people.














 




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