A Space & astronomy forum. SpaceBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » SpaceBanter.com forum » Astronomy and Astrophysics » Astronomy Misc
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Gamma Ray Burst seen with Gravity Wave detection!



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old February 16th 16, 04:24 PM posted to sci.physics,sci.astro
Yousuf Khan[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,686
Default Gamma Ray Burst seen with Gravity Wave detection!

The recent discovery of gravitational waves from the site of a merger of
two stellar mass black holes, may have been accompanied by a Gamma Ray
Burst event too! Why is this even news? Because the theory of black hole
mergers suggests that no form of light should be emitted, only energy in
the form of gravitational waves. If two neutron stars had merged into a
black hole, then sure, no problem there should be light emission, but
not from black holes. So possible new physics found?

Yousuf Khan

[1602.03920] Fermi GBM Observations of LIGO Gravitational Wave event
GW150914
http://arxiv.org/abs/1602.03920
Ads
  #2  
Old February 16th 16, 05:06 PM posted to sci.physics,sci.astro
Sergio
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 37
Default Gamma Ray Burst seen with Gravity Wave detection!

On 2/16/2016 9:24 AM, Yousuf Khan wrote:
The recent discovery of gravitational waves from the site of a merger of
two stellar mass black holes, may have been accompanied by a Gamma Ray
Burst event too! Why is this even news? Because the theory of black hole
mergers suggests that no form of light should be emitted, only energy in
the form of gravitational waves. If two neutron stars had merged into a
black hole, then sure, no problem there should be light emission, but
not from black holes. So possible new physics found?

Yousuf Khan

[1602.03920] Fermi GBM Observations of LIGO Gravitational Wave event
GW150914
http://arxiv.org/abs/1602.03



I would think that the collison is very complex, and much energy is
emitted across the EM spectrum, and particals ejected too.

and the warping of space would have strongly effected other close bodies.

all within less than a second, as these two merged.

where is the detailed simulation ?

  #3  
Old February 16th 16, 05:20 PM posted to sci.physics,sci.astro
Martin Brown
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,707
Default Gamma Ray Burst seen with Gravity Wave detection!

On 16/02/2016 15:24, Yousuf Khan wrote:
The recent discovery of gravitational waves from the site of a merger of
two stellar mass black holes, may have been accompanied by a Gamma Ray
Burst event too! Why is this even news? Because the theory of black hole
mergers suggests that no form of light should be emitted, only energy in
the form of gravitational waves. If two neutron stars had merged into a
black hole, then sure, no problem there should be light emission, but
not from black holes. So possible new physics found?


Not necessarily new physics. The black holes were not sat in a perfect
vacuum and may still have had tenuous accretion disks or other material
in their respective equatorial planes some of which becomes up for grabs
when they merge. It would be surprising if the merger of BH ergospheres
did not provide some mechanism for pumping a fair amount of power out
along the polar axes of the newly formed object.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ergosphere

http://www.caltech.edu/news/unusual-...e-merger-45188

Including but not limited to electromagnetic radiation and particle
creation. It is only the interior of the BH that is forbidden territory
- outside it is a region where things can still interact.

That might be the way to find it...comparing old surveys with new ones
and looking for something faint but with a new flat spectral index.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #4  
Old February 16th 16, 05:23 PM posted to sci.physics,sci.astro
Sam Wormley[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,966
Default Gamma Ray Burst seen with Gravity Wave detection!

On 2/16/16 9:24 AM, Yousuf Khan wrote:
The recent discovery of gravitational waves from the site of a merger of
two stellar mass black holes, may have been accompanied by a Gamma Ray
Burst event too! Why is this even news? Because the theory of black hole
mergers suggests that no form of light should be emitted, only energy in
the form of gravitational waves. If two neutron stars had merged into a
black hole, then sure, no problem there should be light emission, but
not from black holes. So possible new physics found?

Yousuf Khan

[1602.03920] Fermi GBM Observations of LIGO Gravitational Wave event
GW150914
http://arxiv.org/abs/1602.03920



It's hard for me to imagine that two black holes colliding didn't
affect nearby gas and debris, that could generate a burst of gamma
radiation.



--

sci.physics is an unmoderated newsgroup dedicated
to the discussion of physics, news from the physics
community, and physics-related social issues.

  #5  
Old February 17th 16, 11:08 PM posted to sci.physics,sci.astro
Yousuf Khan[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,686
Default Gamma Ray Burst seen with Gravity Wave detection!

On 16/02/2016 11:20 AM, Martin Brown wrote:
Not necessarily new physics. The black holes were not sat in a perfect
vacuum and may still have had tenuous accretion disks or other material
in their respective equatorial planes some of which becomes up for grabs
when they merge. It would be surprising if the merger of BH ergospheres
did not provide some mechanism for pumping a fair amount of power out
along the polar axes of the newly formed object.


True, but let's face it, the accretion disks may have already been
around even before the two BH's merged, and they'd be radiating around
each individual progenitor BH's. Also it's entirely likely that all of
the gas between the black holes were kicked out as the two of them
neared each other.

Including but not limited to electromagnetic radiation and particle
creation. It is only the interior of the BH that is forbidden territory
- outside it is a region where things can still interact.

That might be the way to find it...comparing old surveys with new ones
and looking for something faint but with a new flat spectral index.


I have feeling that the gravity waves might have excited the quantum
vacuum energy field nearby which might have spurred the creation of real
photons.

Yousuf Khan

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gravitational Wave Detection - Comments? TeaTime UK Astronomy 9 October 24th 06 10:28 PM
Terrific gamma ray burst Luigi Caselli Misc 1 February 19th 05 04:15 AM
Swift first gamma ray burst Ray Vingnutte Misc 0 January 7th 05 11:35 PM
What's up with gravity wave detection? dkomo Astronomy Misc 153 September 14th 04 08:15 PM
Observing a Burst with Sunglasses: Unique Five-Week VLT Study ofthe Polarisation of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow (Forwarded) Andrew Yee Astronomy Misc 0 November 13th 03 06:40 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2020 SpaceBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.