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Rocket Test Ranges open to the Public?



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 17th 21, 07:45 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Douglas Eagleson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Rocket Test Ranges open to the Public?

I have two amateur rocket designs. Both are ballistic, meaning they
have a down range flight path.

One is a 29mm high power engine design. I plan on using a
3D printer to make stack-able fuselage sections. A large printer
should be able to make 8 inch tall sections. The section coupling
is included. It is a finless design using a rotating launching tube to
cause inertial stability. Say, 5000 rpm target. It uses 1-1/4
standard pipe. schedule 40 or 80 can be used. The fit
dictates the fuselage thickness around the engine. I hope for a
three mile range controlled by payload mass. Say, a 45 degree
launch tube. I have a proper end mill to cut out a standard
1-1/4 pipe bore in a 4 inch diameter vee-belt pulley.

My question is where to test it out. Is there an approved
range that allows ballistic flight paths?

Or maybe I should be winging it and launching somewhere
in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay?

The second design is a 50 pound payload heavy lifter.
Think like the engine is a 1 foot diameter and 1 foot tall
cylinder with a safe fuel design.
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  #2  
Old February 17th 21, 07:51 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Jeff Findley[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,269
Default Rocket Test Ranges open to the Public?

In article ,
says...

I have two amateur rocket designs. Both are ballistic, meaning they
have a down range flight path.

One is a 29mm high power engine design. I plan on using a
3D printer to make stack-able fuselage sections. A large printer
should be able to make 8 inch tall sections. The section coupling
is included. It is a finless design using a rotating launching tube to
cause inertial stability. Say, 5000 rpm target. It uses 1-1/4
standard pipe. schedule 40 or 80 can be used. The fit
dictates the fuselage thickness around the engine. I hope for a
three mile range controlled by payload mass. Say, a 45 degree
launch tube. I have a proper end mill to cut out a standard
1-1/4 pipe bore in a 4 inch diameter vee-belt pulley.

My question is where to test it out. Is there an approved
range that allows ballistic flight paths?

Or maybe I should be winging it and launching somewhere
in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay?

The second design is a 50 pound payload heavy lifter.
Think like the engine is a 1 foot diameter and 1 foot tall
cylinder with a safe fuel design.


You need to get in touch with a high power rocketry group. They usually
launch such things at meets where they get all the proper approvals
(e.g. FAA). If dim memory serves, I think Balls is the name of one of
the meets. Goggling...

Here we go:

Balls 29 Postponed due to COVID-19
http://www.tripoli.org/Balls29Postponed

Jeff

--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.
  #3  
Old February 18th 21, 02:20 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Alain Fournier[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 528
Default Rocket Test Ranges open to the Public?

On Feb/17/2021 at 13:51, Jeff Findley wrote :
In article ,
says...

I have two amateur rocket designs. Both are ballistic, meaning they
have a down range flight path.

One is a 29mm high power engine design. I plan on using a
3D printer to make stack-able fuselage sections. A large printer
should be able to make 8 inch tall sections. The section coupling
is included. It is a finless design using a rotating launching tube to
cause inertial stability. Say, 5000 rpm target. It uses 1-1/4
standard pipe. schedule 40 or 80 can be used. The fit
dictates the fuselage thickness around the engine. I hope for a
three mile range controlled by payload mass. Say, a 45 degree
launch tube. I have a proper end mill to cut out a standard
1-1/4 pipe bore in a 4 inch diameter vee-belt pulley.

My question is where to test it out. Is there an approved
range that allows ballistic flight paths?

Or maybe I should be winging it and launching somewhere
in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay?


I don't think that would be a good idea.

The second design is a 50 pound payload heavy lifter.
Think like the engine is a 1 foot diameter and 1 foot tall
cylinder with a safe fuel design.


You need to get in touch with a high power rocketry group. They usually
launch such things at meets where they get all the proper approvals
(e.g. FAA). If dim memory serves, I think Balls is the name of one of
the meets. Goggling...

Here we go:

Balls 29 Postponed due to COVID-19
http://www.tripoli.org/Balls29Postponed

That seems to me to be a much better course of action.


Alain Fournier
  #4  
Old February 18th 21, 05:24 PM posted to sci.space.policy
David Spain
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,871
Default Rocket Test Ranges open to the Public?

On 2/17/2021 1:51 PM, Jeff Findley wrote:
In article ,


says...

My question is where to test it out. Is there an approved
range that allows ballistic flight paths?

Or maybe I should be winging it and launching somewhere
in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay?


No.

The second design is a 50 pound payload heavy lifter.
Think like the engine is a 1 foot diameter and 1 foot tall
cylinder with a safe fuel design.


You need to get in touch with a high power rocketry group. They usually
launch such things at meets where they get all the proper approvals
(e.g. FAA). If dim memory serves, I think Balls is the name of one of
the meets. Goggling...

Here we go:

Balls 29 Postponed due to COVID-19
http://www.tripoli.org/Balls29Postponed

Jeff


Agreed. BALLS events are usually held in Black Rock Nevada. The wide
open spaces of the desert southwest are your friend.

You should become of a member of the National Association of Rocketry
and if you are serious about this, pursue the high power rocketry
certifications they offer.

Some links:

https://www.nar.org/
http://www.tripoli.org/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-power_rocketry

Also for expert advice you can subscribe to the ARocket Mailing list he

https://www.freelists.org/list/arocket
http://www.arocketry.net/forum.html

Dave

  #5  
Old February 18th 21, 06:26 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Douglas Eagleson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Rocket Test Ranges open to the Public?

On Wednesday, February 17, 2021 at 1:51:11 PM UTC-5, Jeff Findley wrote:
In article ,
says...

I have two amateur rocket designs. Both are ballistic, meaning they
have a down range flight path.

One is a 29mm high power engine design. I plan on using a
3D printer to make stack-able fuselage sections. A large printer
should be able to make 8 inch tall sections. The section coupling
is included. It is a finless design using a rotating launching tube to
cause inertial stability. Say, 5000 rpm target. It uses 1-1/4
standard pipe. schedule 40 or 80 can be used. The fit
dictates the fuselage thickness around the engine. I hope for a
three mile range controlled by payload mass. Say, a 45 degree
launch tube. I have a proper end mill to cut out a standard
1-1/4 pipe bore in a 4 inch diameter vee-belt pulley.

My question is where to test it out. Is there an approved
range that allows ballistic flight paths?

Or maybe I should be winging it and launching somewhere
in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay?

The second design is a 50 pound payload heavy lifter.
Think like the engine is a 1 foot diameter and 1 foot tall
cylinder with a safe fuel design.

You need to get in touch with a high power rocketry group. They usually
launch such things at meets where they get all the proper approvals
(e.g. FAA). If dim memory serves, I think Balls is the name of one of
the meets. Goggling...

Here we go:

Balls 29 Postponed due to COVID-19
http://www.tripoli.org/Balls29Postponed

Jeff

--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.


Thanks for all the reply's.

I will go with the Balls event and get the official approvals.

If I make a test engine mounted on a bench do I need
approvals? I would of course reach out to an expert first.

The experts on the Inet mentioned the choice of fuels.
Why use anything but the safe fuel. I think this refers
to a sucrose based fuel?
  #6  
Old February 18th 21, 10:41 PM posted to sci.space.policy
David Spain
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,871
Default Rocket Test Ranges open to the Public?

On 2/18/2021 12:26 PM, Douglas Eagleson wrote:

Thanks for all the reply's.

I will go with the Balls event and get the official approvals.


I would sign up for NAR, and any chapters that are local to you first.
Get to know some people first, esp. the folks who organize BALLS. Make
sure you get all the needed certifications first, and have a signed up
slot, rather than waste a trip.


If I make a test engine mounted on a bench do I need
approvals? I would of course reach out to an expert first.


Depends a lot on the state you reside. Some states no. Some states (like
CA, yes). Reach out to the arocket list and ask. Um. Very much recommend
for a large rocket you do these tests outside and isolated, far away
from people and dwellings, esp. your own if you want to retain your
homeowner's insurance policy in effect. Depending upon the materials in
use you should be familiar with all the hazmat procedures for safe
handling. A basic understanding of the physics of combustion and rapid
oxidation wouldn't hurt either, so to speak.

The experts on the Inet mentioned the choice of fuels.
Why use anything but the safe fuel. I think this refers
to a sucrose based fuel?


Anything that can rapidly oxidize is hazardous. Even CO2 rockets can be
injurious, even lethal if they are allowed to build up enough pressure.
Know and understand what you are using. If you are unsure, and
*especially* if you are sure, seek out the advice of others first.

Dave

  #7  
Old February 21st 21, 04:48 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Scott Kozel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 62
Default Rocket Test Ranges open to the Public?

On Wednesday, February 17, 2021 at 8:20:04 PM UTC-5, Alain Fournier wrote:
On Feb/17/2021 at 13:51, Jeff Findley wrote :
In article ,
says...

My question is where to test it out. Is there an approved
range that allows ballistic flight paths?

Or maybe I should be winging it and launching somewhere
in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay?


I don't think that would be a good idea.


Agreed.

Pleasure boats and ships use the Bay. They would be displeased.

  #8  
Old February 22nd 21, 06:08 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Dean Markley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 508
Default Rocket Test Ranges open to the Public?

On Saturday, February 20, 2021 at 10:48:13 PM UTC-5, Scott Kozel wrote:
On Wednesday, February 17, 2021 at 8:20:04 PM UTC-5, Alain Fournier wrote:
On Feb/17/2021 at 13:51, Jeff Findley wrote :
In article ,
says...

My question is where to test it out. Is there an approved
range that allows ballistic flight paths?

Or maybe I should be winging it and launching somewhere
in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay?


I don't think that would be a good idea.

Agreed.

Pleasure boats and ships use the Bay. They would be displeased.



I doubt they need worry much. The Eagleson Bot is well known for wild ideas, not so well known for executing them.
  #9  
Old February 23rd 21, 01:29 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Douglas Eagleson[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Rocket Test Ranges open to the Public?

On Monday, February 22, 2021 at 12:08:28 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Saturday, February 20, 2021 at 10:48:13 PM UTC-5, Scott Kozel wrote:
On Wednesday, February 17, 2021 at 8:20:04 PM UTC-5, Alain Fournier wrote:
On Feb/17/2021 at 13:51, Jeff Findley wrote :
In article ,
says...

My question is where to test it out. Is there an approved
range that allows ballistic flight paths?

Or maybe I should be winging it and launching somewhere
in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay?

I don't think that would be a good idea.

Agreed.

Pleasure boats and ships use the Bay. They would be displeased.

I doubt they need worry much. The Eagleson Bot is well known for wild ideas, not so well known for executing them.


My heavy lifter engine has an important igniter to design.
An aluminum screen is given a cylinder geometry. It
serves also as a mould for the engine chamber.
It is coated with a suitable electric fired flaming glue.
The glue very quickly fires the whole camber, igniting the safe kind of fuel.
This two purpose design allows poring the engine fuel
very simple. A graphite bottom engine cap with a central hole
forms the flame escape.

If you want one the cost is no less than $30K for a prototype with
all the engineering tested. Meaning you have to supply your
own fuel.
 




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