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Jupiter: Spectacular picture of Jupiter's storms



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 22nd 19, 10:47 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
StarDust
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Default Jupiter: Spectacular picture of Jupiter's storms

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47667729

This beautiful picture of Jupiter was assembled from three separate images acquired by Nasa's Juno spacecraft as it made another of its close passes of the gas giant.
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  #2  
Old March 22nd 19, 11:10 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Jupiter: Spectacular picture of Jupiter's storms

On Friday, March 22, 2019 at 10:47:10 AM UTC, StarDust wrote:
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47667729

This beautiful picture of Jupiter was assembled from three separate images acquired by Nasa's Juno spacecraft as it made another of its close passes of the gas giant.


"Scientists hope their various investigations will reveal the key mechanisms that drove the spot and keep it from dissipating."

Easy enough to present a partial answer to that one and it is partial.

http://calgary.rasc.ca/images/planet_inclinations.gif

Jupiter, with its 3 ° inclination, has an Equatorial climate which means conditions do not change appreciably across its orbital circuit or rather, the temperature fluctuations across latitudes based on the exposure to solar radiation is minimal compared to the Earth -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTig9gKegQk


All planets in the solar system, so long as they have an atmosphere or any fluid composition, possess a climate between a spectrum of Equatorial and Polar with the Earth's climate towards the Equatorial end of the spectrum.

Mathematical modelers of climate do not take into account the dynamics which provide seasonal effects arising from planetary motions and specifically dual surface rotations responsible for seasonal weather on a meta scale (hurricane season, Arctic sea ice evolution. ect) and localised weather depending on maritime or continental conditions. What is called 'climate change' presently is an attempt to present planetary climate in experimentalist form thereby omitting the traits on a solar system or planetary scale.



  #3  
Old March 22nd 19, 02:30 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
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Default Jupiter: Spectacular picture of Jupiter's storms

On Friday, 22 March 2019 06:47:10 UTC-4, StarDust wrote:
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47667729

This beautiful picture of Jupiter was assembled from three separate images acquired by Nasa's Juno spacecraft as it made another of its close passes of the gas giant.


I think they should show it as it is, not with pumped-up colour.
  #4  
Old March 22nd 19, 03:09 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Chris L Peterson
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Posts: 10,007
Default Jupiter: Spectacular picture of Jupiter's storms

On Fri, 22 Mar 2019 07:30:36 -0700 (PDT), RichA
wrote:

On Friday, 22 March 2019 06:47:10 UTC-4, StarDust wrote:
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47667729

This beautiful picture of Jupiter was assembled from three separate images acquired by Nasa's Juno spacecraft as it made another of its close passes of the gas giant.


I think they should show it as it is, not with pumped-up colour.


It is precisely our ability to stretch the contrast and enhance color
saturation (or even change the palette completely) that allows us to
extend our senses and see that which we otherwise could not. If this
image was processed to match the capabilities of our eyes, we'd miss
large amounts of information.

These enhancements allow us to see Jupiter much more "as it is" than
if we didn't use them.
  #5  
Old March 22nd 19, 11:41 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
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Posts: 1,076
Default Jupiter: Spectacular picture of Jupiter's storms

On Friday, 22 March 2019 11:09:16 UTC-4, Chris L Peterson wrote:
On Fri, 22 Mar 2019 07:30:36 -0700 (PDT), RichA
wrote:

On Friday, 22 March 2019 06:47:10 UTC-4, StarDust wrote:
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47667729

This beautiful picture of Jupiter was assembled from three separate images acquired by Nasa's Juno spacecraft as it made another of its close passes of the gas giant.


I think they should show it as it is, not with pumped-up colour.


It is precisely our ability to stretch the contrast and enhance color
saturation (or even change the palette completely) that allows us to
extend our senses and see that which we otherwise could not. If this
image was processed to match the capabilities of our eyes, we'd miss
large amounts of information.

These enhancements allow us to see Jupiter much more "as it is" than
if we didn't use them.


There is NO way to tell if detail "created" via deconvolution, colour exaggeration or other "enhancement" methods is real or not. I remember these arguments when digital first got going in astronomy.
  #6  
Old March 23rd 19, 12:23 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Chris L Peterson
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Posts: 10,007
Default Jupiter: Spectacular picture of Jupiter's storms

On Fri, 22 Mar 2019 16:41:03 -0700 (PDT), RichA
wrote:

On Friday, 22 March 2019 11:09:16 UTC-4, Chris L Peterson wrote:
On Fri, 22 Mar 2019 07:30:36 -0700 (PDT), RichA
wrote:

On Friday, 22 March 2019 06:47:10 UTC-4, StarDust wrote:
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47667729

This beautiful picture of Jupiter was assembled from three separate images acquired by Nasa's Juno spacecraft as it made another of its close passes of the gas giant.

I think they should show it as it is, not with pumped-up colour.


It is precisely our ability to stretch the contrast and enhance color
saturation (or even change the palette completely) that allows us to
extend our senses and see that which we otherwise could not. If this
image was processed to match the capabilities of our eyes, we'd miss
large amounts of information.

These enhancements allow us to see Jupiter much more "as it is" than
if we didn't use them.


There is NO way to tell if detail "created" via deconvolution, colour exaggeration or other "enhancement" methods is real or not. I remember these arguments when digital first got going in astronomy.


Rubbish. All of the raw data is publicly available.

https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/Vau...3&t=1528468966
https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/Vau...4&t=1528468966
https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/Vau...2&t=1528468966

Feel free to process it yourself, however you want. Feel free to
compare the raw data to processed images made by other people.
 




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