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Falcon Heavy transporter-erector



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 30th 19, 07:42 PM posted to sci.space.policy
snidely
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Posts: 1,151
Default Falcon Heavy transporter-erector

Does anyone have more "size" data for the FH TE than that is 212 feet
tall?

I understand it is winched up the ramp at Pad 39A, and that
railroad-style rails are on the ramp, but only as guidance features.

Does it go from the assembly building to the ramp by being pulled by a
tractor? The pictures I've seen of a Falcon Heavy being transported
are either close enough to the rocket to not show a tow vehicle, or too
far away.

Bonus points if you have the information for the F9 TE.

/dps


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In case of fire, exit the building before tweeting about it.
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  #2  
Old July 1st 19, 01:10 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Fred J. McCall[_3_]
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Posts: 10,018
Default Falcon Heavy transporter-erector

Snidely wrote on Sun, 30 Jun 2019 11:42:59
-0700:

Does anyone have more "size" data for the FH TE than that is 212 feet
tall?

I understand it is winched up the ramp at Pad 39A, and that
railroad-style rails are on the ramp, but only as guidance features.

Does it go from the assembly building to the ramp by being pulled by a
tractor? The pictures I've seen of a Falcon Heavy being transported
are either close enough to the rocket to not show a tow vehicle, or too
far away.


SpaceX uses a 'self-powered' Transporter/Erector for both F9 and FH.


Bonus points if you have the information for the F9 TE.


Do I get extra points for a video that actually shows it?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaOVhRNtnWU


--
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable
man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore,
all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
--George Bernard Shaw
  #3  
Old July 3rd 19, 06:08 PM posted to sci.space.policy
snidely
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,151
Default Falcon Heavy transporter-erector

On Sunday or thereabouts, Fred J. McCall declared ...
Snidely wrote on Sun, 30 Jun 2019 11:42:59
-0700:

Does anyone have more "size" data for the FH TE than that is 212 feet
tall?

I understand it is winched up the ramp at Pad 39A, and that
railroad-style rails are on the ramp, but only as guidance features.

Does it go from the assembly building to the ramp by being pulled by a
tractor? The pictures I've seen of a Falcon Heavy being transported
are either close enough to the rocket to not show a tow vehicle, or too
far away.


SpaceX uses a 'self-powered' Transporter/Erector for both F9 and FH.


Bonus points if you have the information for the F9 TE.


Do I get extra points for a video that actually shows it?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaOVhRNtnWU


A nice video, and the judges are discussing your merit badge, but the
voice over skipped the stats ... and didn't identify the location. Can
you prod the narrator?

/dps

--
"This is all very fine, but let us not be carried away be excitement,
but ask calmly, how does this person feel about in in his cooler
moments next day, with six or seven thousand feet of snow and stuff on
top of him?"
_Roughing It_, Mark Twain.
  #4  
Old July 3rd 19, 08:13 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Niklas Holsti
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Posts: 128
Default Falcon Heavy transporter-erector

On 19-07-01 03:10 , Fred J. McCall wrote:
Snidely wrote on Sun, 30 Jun 2019 11:42:59
-0700:

Does anyone have more "size" data for the FH TE than that is 212 feet
tall?

I understand it is winched up the ramp at Pad 39A, and that
railroad-style rails are on the ramp, but only as guidance features.

Does it go from the assembly building to the ramp by being pulled by a
tractor? The pictures I've seen of a Falcon Heavy being transported
are either close enough to the rocket to not show a tow vehicle, or too
far away.


SpaceX uses a 'self-powered' Transporter/Erector for both F9 and FH.


Bonus points if you have the information for the F9 TE.


Do I get extra points for a video that actually shows it?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaOVhRNtnWU


That looks like a plain transporter with no erection functionality. Its
transporting just a first stage (with interstage) and is much too short
for a full Falcon 9 with first stage + second stage + payload.

--
Niklas Holsti
Tidorum Ltd
niklas holsti tidorum fi
. @ .
  #5  
Old July 4th 19, 10:06 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Anthony Frost
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 247
Default Falcon Heavy transporter-erector

In message
Niklas Holsti wrote:

On 19-07-01 03:10 , Fred J. McCall wrote:
Snidely wrote on Sun, 30 Jun 2019 11:42:59
-0700:


Bonus points if you have the information for the F9 TE.


Do I get extra points for a video that actually shows it?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaOVhRNtnWU


That looks like a plain transporter with no erection functionality. Its
transporting just a first stage (with interstage) and is much too short
for a full Falcon 9 with first stage + second stage + payload.


As the text on the YouTube page says, that's the old shuttle transporter
that SpaceX bought off NASA and modified to carry returned first stages
between Port Canaveral, LZ-1 and their various refurbishment and storage
facilities around the area.

Anthony

  #6  
Old July 4th 19, 12:52 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Jeff Findley[_6_]
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Posts: 2,057
Default Falcon Heavy transporter-erector

In article ,
lid says...

On 19-07-01 03:10 , Fred J. McCall wrote:
Snidely wrote on Sun, 30 Jun 2019 11:42:59
-0700:

Does anyone have more "size" data for the FH TE than that is 212 feet
tall?

I understand it is winched up the ramp at Pad 39A, and that
railroad-style rails are on the ramp, but only as guidance features.

Does it go from the assembly building to the ramp by being pulled by a
tractor? The pictures I've seen of a Falcon Heavy being transported
are either close enough to the rocket to not show a tow vehicle, or too
far away.


SpaceX uses a 'self-powered' Transporter/Erector for both F9 and FH.


Bonus points if you have the information for the F9 TE.


Do I get extra points for a video that actually shows it?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaOVhRNtnWU

That looks like a plain transporter with no erection functionality. Its
transporting just a first stage (with interstage) and is much too short
for a full Falcon 9 with first stage + second stage + payload.


Here's an article with a very nice picture of the transporter erector at
Vandenberg:

https://spaceflightnow.com/2016/10/3...edure-fix-can-
allow-falcon-9-launches-to-resume/

Here is a great picture of the transporter erector at LC-40 at Cape
Canaveral:

https://www.spacex.com/news/2013/02/...uccessful-wet-
dress-rehearsal

And finally, here is an article with a picture of the transporter
erector used at KSC LC-39A.

https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-cre...launch-photos/

Pic of interest in above article (click on the picture to open up in new
window, then click again to expand; it's really detailed!):

https://www.teslarati.com/crew-drago...ollout-022819-
nasa-joel-kowsky-6-crop-c/

In the pictures above, you can see what looks like, to me anyway, a
fairly typical vehicle used at airports to tow aircraft around.

Jeff
--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.
  #7  
Old July 4th 19, 12:57 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Jeff Findley[_6_]
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Posts: 2,057
Default Falcon Heavy transporter-erector

In article ,
says...

In article ,
lid says...

That looks like a plain transporter with no erection functionality. Its
transporting just a first stage (with interstage) and is much too short
for a full Falcon 9 with first stage + second stage + payload.


Here's an article with a very nice picture of the transporter erector at
Vandenberg:

https://spaceflightnow.com/2016/10/3...edure-fix-can-
allow-falcon-9-launches-to-resume/

Here is a great picture of the transporter erector at LC-40 at Cape
Canaveral:

https://www.spacex.com/news/2013/02/...uccessful-wet-
dress-rehearsal

And finally, here is an article with a picture of the transporter
erector used at KSC LC-39A.

https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-cre...launch-photos/


Ok, here is the best picture of the one at KSC LC-39A. In addition to
the airport tow vehicle, you can see on either side (near the base of
the launch vehicle) that there are two separate sets of train tracks
with some sort of self-powered diesel electric bogies.

https://www.teslarati.com/wp-content...Dragon-Falcon-
9-DM-1-39A-rollout-022819-NASA-Joel-Kowsky-5-c.jpg

So, whoever said "self powered" for the LC-39A transporter erector seems
to be correct based on the detailed photographic evidence. Makes sense,
considering the grade of the ramp up to the actual launch pad.

Jeff
--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.
  #8  
Old July 4th 19, 07:38 PM posted to sci.space.policy
snidely
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,151
Default Falcon Heavy transporter-erector

Anthony Frost explained on 7/4/2019 :
In message
Niklas Holsti wrote:

On 19-07-01 03:10 , Fred J. McCall wrote:
Snidely wrote on Sun, 30 Jun 2019 11:42:59
-0700:


Bonus points if you have the information for the F9 TE.


Do I get extra points for a video that actually shows it?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaOVhRNtnWU


That looks like a plain transporter with no erection functionality. Its
transporting just a first stage (with interstage) and is much too short
for a full Falcon 9 with first stage + second stage + payload.


As the text on the YouTube page says, that's the old shuttle transporter
that SpaceX bought off NASA and modified to carry returned first stages
between Port Canaveral, LZ-1 and their various refurbishment and storage
facilities around the area.


Doing a little more video search,
URL:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUDes_wpGvg
has the transporter taking the Shuttle (probably to the SPS, eh?)
and also highway transport of an F9.
Saturn V transport is also shown.

There is a brief distant shot of the TE erecting.

No stats.

/dps


--
"This is all very fine, but let us not be carried away be excitement,
but ask calmly, how does this person feel about in in his cooler
moments next day, with six or seven thousand feet of snow and stuff on
top of him?"
_Roughing It_, Mark Twain.
  #9  
Old July 4th 19, 07:55 PM posted to sci.space.policy
snidely
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,151
Default Falcon Heavy transporter-erector

Jeff Findley asserted that:
In article ,
says...

In article ,
lid says...

That looks like a plain transporter with no erection functionality. Its
transporting just a first stage (with interstage) and is much too short
for a full Falcon 9 with first stage + second stage + payload.


Here's an article with a very nice picture of the transporter erector at
Vandenberg:

https://spaceflightnow.com/2016/10/3...edure-fix-can-
allow-falcon-9-launches-to-resume/

Here is a great picture of the transporter erector at LC-40 at Cape
Canaveral:

https://www.spacex.com/news/2013/02/...uccessful-wet-
dress-rehearsal

And finally, here is an article with a picture of the transporter
erector used at KSC LC-39A.

https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-cre...launch-photos/


Ok, here is the best picture of the one at KSC LC-39A. In addition to
the airport tow vehicle, you can see on either side (near the base of
the launch vehicle) that there are two separate sets of train tracks
with some sort of self-powered diesel electric bogies.

https://www.teslarati.com/wp-content...Dragon-Falcon-
9-DM-1-39A-rollout-022819-NASA-Joel-Kowsky-5-c.jpg

So, whoever said "self powered" for the LC-39A transporter erector seems
to be correct based on the detailed photographic evidence. Makes sense,
considering the grade of the ramp up to the actual launch pad.


Thank you! Teslarati is a great site, and their correspondents got
great shots of the recent FH night launch. I'm not sure I had
discovered it at the time of the test flight you pointed to.

The yellow cart following the bogeys (freight train trucks) is probably
supplying air for the brakes.

The description I had found for the FH TE mentioned cable winches to
pull it up the final ramp.

/dps

--
"I am not given to exaggeration, and when I say a thing I mean it"
_Roughing It_, Mark Twain
  #10  
Old July 4th 19, 08:00 PM posted to sci.space.policy
snidely
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,151
Default Falcon Heavy transporter-erector

Snidely submitted this idea :
Jeff Findley asserted that:
In article ,
says...

In article ,
lid says...

That looks like a plain transporter with no erection functionality. Its
transporting just a first stage (with interstage) and is much too short
for a full Falcon 9 with first stage + second stage + payload.

Here's an article with a very nice picture of the transporter erector at
Vandenberg:

https://spaceflightnow.com/2016/10/3...edure-fix-can-
allow-falcon-9-launches-to-resume/

Here is a great picture of the transporter erector at LC-40 at Cape
Canaveral:

https://www.spacex.com/news/2013/02/...uccessful-wet-
dress-rehearsal

And finally, here is an article with a picture of the transporter erector
used at KSC LC-39A.

https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-cre...launch-photos/


Ok, here is the best picture of the one at KSC LC-39A. In addition to the
airport tow vehicle, you can see on either side (near the base of the
launch vehicle) that there are two separate sets of train tracks with some
sort of self-powered diesel electric bogies.

https://www.teslarati.com/wp-content...Dragon-Falcon-
9-DM-1-39A-rollout-022819-NASA-Joel-Kowsky-5-c.jpg

So, whoever said "self powered" for the LC-39A transporter erector seems to
be correct based on the detailed photographic evidence. Makes sense,
considering the grade of the ramp up to the actual launch pad.


Thank you! Teslarati is a great site, and their correspondents got great
shots of the recent FH night launch. I'm not sure I had discovered it at the
time of the test flight you pointed to.

The yellow cart following the bogeys (freight train trucks) is probably
supplying air for the brakes.

The description I had found for the FH TE mentioned cable winches to pull it
up the final ramp.


The [Crew] Dragon-end shot leaving the assembly building seems to show
2 tugs side by side.

Mind the wrap:
URL:https://www.teslarati.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Crew-Dragon-Falcon-9-DM-1-39A-rollout-022819-NASA-Joel-Kowsky-1-c.jpg

/dps

--
"What do you think of my cart, Miss Morland? A neat one, is not it?
Well hung: curricle-hung in fact. Come sit by me and we'll test the
springs."
(Speculative fiction by H.Lacedaemonian.)
 




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