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Berkeley 30



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 11th 17, 07:30 PM
WA0CKY WA0CKY is offline
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First recorded activity by SpaceBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 689
Default Berkeley 30

Berkeley 30 is a rarely imaged open star cluster in Monoceros. WEBDA puts it at a distance of about 15,600 light-years. They give an age of 300 million years with 0.5 magnitudes of reddening due to dust between us and the cluster. It seems to have a lot of red giant stars. Seems many of its massive stars are about the same mass so entering the red giant stage at about the same time. Other sources seem to disagree. I find distance estimates of 7600 light years and an age of 900 million years in one paper for instance. This shows the difficulty of studying these objects.

There are quite a few galaxies in the image if you look very closely, three on the east edge of the main part of the cluster for example. None however have any redshift or other distance data so I've not prepared an annotated image. I'll let those interested hunt up these very small faint fuzzies.

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x10' RGB=1x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

Rick
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  #2  
Old April 11th 17, 09:13 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Mandy Liefbowitz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default Berkeley 30

On Tue, 11 Apr 2017 19:30:39 +0100, WA0CKY
wrote:


Berkeley 30 is a rarely imaged open star cluster in Monoceros. WEBDA
puts it at a distance of about 15,600 light-years. They give an age of
300 million years with 0.5 magnitudes of reddening due to dust between
us and the cluster. It seems to have a lot of red giant stars. Seems
many of its massive stars are about the same mass so entering the red
giant stage at about the same time. Other sources seem to disagree. I
find distance estimates of 7600 light years and an age of 900 million
years in one paper for instance. This shows the difficulty of studying
these objects.

There are quite a few galaxies in the image if you look very closely,
three on the east edge of the main part of the cluster for example.
None however have any redshift or other distance data so I've not
prepared an annotated image. I'll let those interested hunt up these
very small faint fuzzies.


Thank you.
I see four quite bright stars in a line just to the left (east?) of
the cluster. I'm assuming those are nearby objects?
Do they have names and histories and exoplanets?
Are they related (yes, I do know that's unlikely as two are very blue
and two orangish but they could be a co-moving group)?

Thanks for all the lovely images,
Mand.



14" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x10' RGB=1x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

Rick

  #3  
Old April 12th 17, 05:26 AM
WA0CKY WA0CKY is offline
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First recorded activity by SpaceBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 689
Default

Alignments like these 4 stars are very common and usually quite meaningless as they are just coincidental. When working in the Milky Way as this image does, there are so many stars such accidental alignments are to be expected. I find nothing to indicate these are anything but such a coincidental alignment.

Only the top star has a catalog listing other than that of the Hubble Guide Star Catalog/Tycho catalog. It is SAO 114695 at magnitude 9.1. Below it is GSC 153:2491 at magnitude 11.9. Below that is GSC 153:1480 at magnitude 10.3 and the bottom star is GSC 153:1814 at magnitude 9.8. Only GSC 153:1480 has a parallax measurement. That puts it at about 58 light-years. I find nothing in the literature connecting these stars in any way. Most studies looking for exo-planets are based on the summer sky. Only a very few have been found in the winter sky as it hasn't had the massive Kepler type study made here due to the winter Milky way being less dense than the summer Milky Way. I find nothing to indicate these stars or any other in the field have been studied for such planets.

Rick

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandy Liefbowitz View Post
On Tue, 11 Apr 2017 19:30:39 +0100,
Thank you.
I see four quite bright stars in a line just to the left (east?) of
the cluster. I'm assuming those are nearby objects?
Do they have names and histories and exoplanets?
Are they related (yes, I do know that's unlikely as two are very blue
and two orangish but they could be a co-moving group)?

Thanks for all the lovely images,
Mand.
  #4  
Old April 13th 17, 12:09 AM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Mandy Liefbowitz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default Berkeley 30

On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 05:26:08 +0100, WA0CKY
wrote:


Alignments like these 4 stars are very common and usually quite
meaningless as they are just coincidental. When working in the Milky
Way as this image does, there are so many stars such accidental
alignments are to be expected. I find nothing to indicate these are
anything but such a coincidental alignment.


True enough. In many images, I see perfect circles of stars that are
probably all unrelated to one another. Some images have scores of
circles. Some have score of lines, triangles, Faux-Orions and other
accidental asterisms.
As you say, there are *lots* of stars out there.

Still, that line-up is neat. Maybe it needs a name? Wa0cky's Quartet?
Rick's Ruler?


Only the top star has a catalog listing other than that of the Hubble
Guide Star Catalog/Tycho catalog. It is SAO 114695 at magnitude 9.1.
Below it is GSC 153:2491 at magnitude 11.9. Below that is GSC 153:1480
at magnitude 10.3 and the bottom star is GSC 153:1814 at magnitude 9.8.
Only GSC 153:1480 has a parallax measurement. That puts it at about 58
light-years. I find nothing in the literature connecting these stars in
any way. Most studies looking for exo-planets are based on the summer
sky. Only a very few have been found in the winter sky as it hasn't had
the massive Kepler type study made here due to the winter Milky way
being less dense than the summer Milky Way. I find nothing to indicate
these stars or any other in the field have been studied for such
planets.


Thank you, sir, you are a very nice person.
Your reply is very interesting, helpful and knowledgeable, as always.
Your kindness is appreciated,
Mand.


Rick

Mandy Liefbowitz;1334132 Wrote:
On Tue, 11 Apr 2017 19:30:39 +0100,
Thank you.
I see four quite bright stars in a line just to the left (east?) of
the cluster. I'm assuming those are nearby objects?
Do they have names and histories and exoplanets?
Are they related (yes, I do know that's unlikely as two are very blue
and two orangish but they could be a co-moving group)?

Thanks for all the lovely images,
Mand.

  #5  
Old April 13th 17, 11:23 PM
WA0CKY WA0CKY is offline
Senior Member
 
First recorded activity by SpaceBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 689
Default

As I mentioned such asterisms litter the sky. Probably the most famous linear one is Kemble’s Cascade. An unnamed 4 star line of brighter but wider spaced stars cross it with one also a part of Kemble’s Cascade. http://oneminuteastronomer.com/5176/kembles-cascade/

The human brain is hard wired to see such figures in stars, window stains, toast, clouds, whatever. You can even write your name in galaxies. http://mygalaxies.co.uk/

Rick
  #6  
Old April 16th 17, 09:41 PM
slilge slilge is offline
Senior Member
 
First recorded activity by SpaceBanter: Aug 2008
Posts: 151
Default

Neat image Rick. In spite on of being missed in NGC and IC catalogues the cluster stands out well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WA0CKY View Post
The human brain is hard wired to see such figures in stars, window stains, toast, clouds, whatever. You can even write your name in galaxies. http://mygalaxies.co.uk/
Thanks for the link with the galaxy-letters. That's quite funny.

Stefan
 




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