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NGC 5698 and Interacting Pair LEDA 097532



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 30th 17, 07:51 PM
WA0CKY WA0CKY is offline
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First recorded activity by SpaceBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 689
Default NGC 5698 and Interacting Pair LEDA 097532

NGC 5698 is an SBb spiral in Bootes one degree east of Seginus (Gamma) Bootes. It has a rather strange ice cream cone shape with a faint drawn out arm or plume on the eastern side. Usually, such distortion is due to an interaction with another nearby galaxy. NGC 5732 is the nearest candidate with a similar redshift but is perfectly normal looking so probably isn't the culprit. I checked a few others in the area but they were either the wrong distance and/or undisturbed. It could be due to a merger but I found no papers discussing anything to do with its distorted shape or suggesting it has interacted with anything. So how it ended up looking like it does is still a mystery to me. If anyone knows more please let me know. Ignoring the plumes I get a size of 85,000 light-years. Including them I get 135,000 light-years for a size assuming it is 180 million light-years from us as NED's redshift using the 5 year WMAP data shows. It was discovered by William Herschel on May 16, 1787 but didn't make either H400 observing program.

The other interesting object in my image is LEDA 097532 a pair of obviously interacting galaxies with a plume appearing to connect the two though it could be in front of or behind the other galaxy. Again, I found nothing on their interaction. They are about 480 to 490 million light-years distant. I get a size for the northern galaxy of 43,000 light years and a bit over 100,000 light-years for the southern galaxy thanks to its plumes. The projected distance between their cores is 60,000 light-years. Projected distance assumes they are equally distant from us. Since this is unlikely their true separation distance is likely larger, how much larger is the question.

While transparency was finally excellent for this image allowing me to easily go beyond 22nd magnitude and pick up galaxies NED shows at over 5 billion light-years, seeing would suddenly distort things severely. This resulted in some stars being elongated in various directions and other, often only a short angular distance away, looking normal. I can't recall ever having such distortion before. Very odd.

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x10' RGB=2x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME

Rick
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  #2  
Old July 1st 17, 07:13 PM
slilge slilge is offline
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Posts: 151
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Rick,

what a field. NGC 5698 looks great and the PGC pair is spectacular. Another one that I would want to have ten times nearer to us.

Stefan
  #3  
Old July 1st 17, 11:38 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Mandy Liefbowitz
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Posts: 19
Default NGC 5698 and Interacting Pair LEDA 097532

On Fri, 30 Jun 2017 19:51:09 +0100, WA0CKY
wrote:


NGC 5698 is an SBb spiral in Bootes one degree east of Seginus (Gamma)
Bootes. It has a rather strange ice cream cone shape with a faint drawn
out arm or plume on the eastern side.



Am I imagining things or is there really a very faint plumey thing
falling "down" the image from the left-hand side of that galaxy?
If it's real, I'm seeing it as several times the width of the starry
part in length.

It's probably an artifact of the processing.


Usually, such distortion is due
to an interaction with another nearby galaxy. NGC 5732 is the nearest
candidate with a similar redshift but is perfectly normal looking so
probably isn't the culprit. I checked a few others in the area but they
were either the wrong distance and/or undisturbed. It could be due to a
merger but I found no papers discussing anything to do with its
distorted shape or suggesting it has interacted with anything. So how
it ended up looking like it does is still a mystery to me. If anyone
knows more please let me know. Ignoring the plumes I get a size of
85,000 light-years. Including them I get 135,000 light-years for a size
assuming it is 180 million light-years from us as NED's redshift using
the 5 year WMAP data shows. It was discovered by William Herschel on
May 16, 1787 but didn't make either H400 observing program.

The other interesting object in my image is LEDA 097532 a pair of
obviously interacting galaxies with a plume appearing to connect the two
though it could be in front of or behind the other galaxy. Again, I
found nothing on their interaction. They are about 480 to 490 million
light-years distant. I get a size for the northern galaxy of 43,000
light years and a bit over 100,000 light-years for the southern galaxy
thanks to its plumes. The projected distance between their cores is
60,000 light-years. Projected distance assumes they are equally distant
from us. Since this is unlikely their true separation distance is
likely larger, how much larger is the question.

While transparency was finally excellent for this image allowing me to
easily go beyond 22nd magnitude and pick up galaxies NED shows at over 5
billion light-years, seeing would suddenly distort things severely.
This resulted in some stars being elongated in various directions and
other, often only a short angular distance away, looking normal. I
can't recall ever having such distortion before. Very odd.

14" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x10' RGB=2x10', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME



Thank you for all of these, many are incredibly lovely.

I need a Starship!
Mand.


Rick

  #4  
Old July 2nd 17, 09:00 PM
WA0CKY WA0CKY is offline
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First recorded activity by SpaceBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 689
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandy Liefbowitz View Post
On Fri, 30 Jun 2017 19:51:09 +0100,

Am I imagining things or is there really a very faint plumey thing
falling "down" the image from the left-hand side of that galaxy?
If it's real, I'm seeing it as several times the width of the starry
part in length.

It's probably an artifact of the processing.

[
I can't see what you are seeing. All I see is the obvious plume going up and around from the left side and a very faint hint of one from the right side running horizontally below the galaxy that needs much more exposure time to define.

I've attached a severely stretched black and white negative version of the image to bring out faint features and can't see it. Can you use a basic image program to indicate where it is?

Rick
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  #5  
Old July 3rd 17, 08:12 PM posted to alt.binaries.pictures.astro
Mandy Liefbowitz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default NGC 5698 and Interacting Pair LEDA 097532

On Sun, 2 Jul 2017 21:00:43 +0100, WA0CKY
wrote:


Mandy Liefbowitz;1336617 Wrote:
On Fri, 30 Jun 2017 19:51:09 +0100,

Am I imagining things or is there really a very faint plumey thing
falling "down" the image from the left-hand side of that galaxy?
If it's real, I'm seeing it as several times the width of the starry
part in length.

It's probably an artifact of the processing.

[


I can't see what you are seeing. All I see is the obvious plume going
up and around from the left side and a very faint hint of one from the
right side running horizontally below the galaxy that needs much more
exposure time to define.

I've attached a severely stretched black and white negative version of
the image to bring out faint features and can't see it. Can you use a
basic image program to indicate where it is?


Nope, sorry, ignore my previous. It must be an artifact of my
eye-brain complex or something as it doesn't show on your negative
image. I should have tried this before posting. Sorry.

Thank you for trying.

Much appreciate everything you do.
Mand.


Rick

  #6  
Old August 15th 17, 09:21 PM
slilge slilge is offline
Senior Member
 
First recorded activity by SpaceBanter: Aug 2008
Posts: 151
Default

Mighty image Rick.
Wanted to put it on my list but it was already there :-)

Those PGC M51-lookalike galaxies are a nice addition.

Stefan
 




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