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triple flare?



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 2nd 08, 06:25 AM posted to sci.astro.satellites.visual-observe
AndrewM
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Posts: 1
Default triple flare?

On Sat ~23:00 PDT from 47.74N, 122.65W I observed 3 faint satellites
flare in the same spot about 1 minute apart along the same path. Due to
trees to the NW and shadow to the E, I only saw them for about 45
degrees of the pass. They appeared to come out the NNW headed to ESE.
They each were quite faint - barely visible - but flared very brightly
when each was highest; about 60 degrees up in the ENE for about 5 seconds.

This is the second time I've seen 3 satellites in the same close orbit
flare in the same place, but I didn't record the previous observations.

Any ideas? Heavens-above.com didn't help.

TIA,
Andrew.

PS: my apologies for inexact observations. I'm a very casual observer,
but this ones bugging me, twice over now.
  #2  
Old September 20th 08, 04:49 AM posted to sci.astro.satellites.visual-observe
JAY RESPLER
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Posts: 2
Default triple flare?

On Sep 2, 1:25 am, AndrewM wrote:
On Sat ~23:00 PDT from 47.74N, 122.65W I observed 3 faint satellites
flare in the same spot about 1 minute apart along the same path. Due to
trees to the NW and shadow to the E, I only saw them for about 45
degrees of the pass. They appeared to come out the NNW headed to ESE.
They each were quite faint - barely visible - but flared very brightly
when each was highest; about 60 degrees up in the ENE for about 5 seconds.

This is the second time I've seen 3 satellites in the same close orbit
flare in the same place, but I didn't record the previous observations.

Any ideas? Heavens-above.com didn't help.

TIA,
Andrew.


Sounds like a NOSS trio of satellites.
Jay
  #3  
Old September 20th 08, 04:32 PM posted to sci.astro.satellites.visual-observe
cmunhollon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default triple flare?

Any idea of the elevation and travel degree's involved? Estimate as you
would a watch face.
Heavens above will not provide beyond limited "public popular" sight items.
You could have had
a flight of aircraft at high altitude in transit.

"AndrewM" wrote in message
. ..
On Sat ~23:00 PDT from 47.74N, 122.65W I observed 3 faint satellites
flare in the same spot about 1 minute apart along the same path. Due to
trees to the NW and shadow to the E, I only saw them for about 45
degrees of the pass. They appeared to come out the NNW headed to ESE.
They each were quite faint - barely visible - but flared very brightly
when each was highest; about 60 degrees up in the ENE for about 5 seconds.

This is the second time I've seen 3 satellites in the same close orbit
flare in the same place, but I didn't record the previous observations.

Any ideas? Heavens-above.com didn't help.

TIA,
Andrew.

PS: my apologies for inexact observations. I'm a very casual observer, but
this ones bugging me, twice over now.


 




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