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If some gravity "leaks" into a 4th physical dimension, why can't theymeasure the loss?



 
 
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Old December 22nd 18, 03:22 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
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Default If some gravity "leaks" into a 4th physical dimension, why can't theymeasure the loss?

They measured gravity waves from colliding neutron stars and black holes, how much more difficult would it be to measure gravity loss? They call the dimension "the Bulk" which theoretically lives below our universe. Since gravity isn't bound to anything, some of the gravity of things in our universe must leak into the Bulk. So how hard would it be to measure a lack of gravity for something like the Earth or Moon?
 




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