A Space & astronomy forum. SpaceBanter.com

Go Back   Home » SpaceBanter.com forum » Astronomy and Astrophysics » Amateur Astronomy
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Sky and Tel: Venus ignored, too much emphasis on LONG DEAD Mars?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old August 5th 18, 02:44 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Chris L Peterson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,007
Default Sky and Tel: Venus ignored, too much emphasis on LONG DEAD Mars?

On Sat, 4 Aug 2018 21:37:11 -0700 (PDT), RichA
wrote:

On Friday, 3 August 2018 02:57:23 UTC-4, Chris L Peterson wrote:
On Thu, 2 Aug 2018 21:06:17 -0700 (PDT), RichA
wrote:

On Wednesday, 1 August 2018 19:59:37 UTC-4, Quadibloc wrote:
On Wednesday, August 1, 2018 at 5:19:31 PM UTC-6, RichA wrote:
Really, Venus may be 800 degrees on the surface, but Mars is just as dead.

If there's liquid water underground on Mars, we can't quite completely rule out
life on Mars any more. Of course, Mars has always been considered as a possible
home of life due to its superficial similarity to Earth - the gas giants, or
some of their satellites, _may_ be much better bets.

Venus is rather more certainly dead, thanks to being 800 degrees hot - and not
only is it less likely to already have life, it's also less useful to Earthly
life, specifically human beings. It might be possible to use Mars as a place to
live.

But is it possible Venus at some point was more hospitable to life than Mars ever was?


It is certainly possible. But that's not something we're likely to
determine from a surface probe.


I just want better pictures. Mars has been imaged to death.


And yet, new images continue to produce new discoveries. Not to
mention all the other instrumentation that doesn't get reported on so
much in the popular press, but which produce a steady stream of
papers.
  #12  
Old August 5th 18, 03:37 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Quadibloc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,018
Default Sky and Tel: Venus ignored, too much emphasis on LONG DEAD Mars?

On Saturday, August 4, 2018 at 10:37:13 PM UTC-6, RichA wrote:

I just want better pictures. Mars has been imaged to death.


Venus' atmosphere is so dense, it interferes with taking good pictures there, so
it will hardly help.

John Savard

  #13  
Old August 7th 18, 02:23 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,076
Default Sky and Tel: Venus ignored, too much emphasis on LONG DEAD Mars?

On Sunday, 5 August 2018 10:37:02 UTC-4, Quadibloc wrote:
On Saturday, August 4, 2018 at 10:37:13 PM UTC-6, RichA wrote:

I just want better pictures. Mars has been imaged to death.


Venus' atmosphere is so dense, it interferes with taking good pictures there, so
it will hardly help.

John Savard


I thought the Russian images from 1975(?) were pretty good, given the technology then. I don't know what the atmospheric extinction is, but they can still image their immediate surroundings.
  #14  
Old August 7th 18, 08:59 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Mike Collins[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,824
Default Sky and Tel: Venus ignored, too much emphasis on LONG DEAD Mars?

RichA wrote:
On Sunday, 5 August 2018 10:37:02 UTC-4, Quadibloc wrote:
On Saturday, August 4, 2018 at 10:37:13 PM UTC-6, RichA wrote:

I just want better pictures. Mars has been imaged to death.


Venus' atmosphere is so dense, it interferes with taking good pictures there, so
it will hardly help.

John Savard


I thought the Russian images from 1975(?) were pretty good, given the
technology then. I don't know what the atmospheric extinction is, but
they can still image their immediate


The Venera 13 colour images show a horizon although there is some doubt
whether it is 100 metres away or a mirage.


  #15  
Old August 8th 18, 07:22 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Chris.B[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,001
Default Sky and Tel: Venus ignored, too much emphasis on LONG DEAD Mars?

On Tuesday, 7 August 2018 09:59:04 UTC+2, Mike Collins wrote:

I thought the Russian images from 1975(?) were pretty good, given the
technology then. I don't know what the atmospheric extinction is, but
they can still image their immediate


The Venera 13 colour images show a horizon although there is some doubt
whether it is 100 metres away or a mirage.


Is the density and chemical makeup of Venus' atmosphere sufficient to cause noticeable refraction? I suppose if the visual sensor is totally immersed then it hardly matters. Only if they are looking in, or out of the toxic goldfish bowl would one enjoy the "stick in water" effect.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mars: As dead as Venus ever was? Rich[_1_] Amateur Astronomy 0 February 16th 08 01:01 AM
Venus is alive, Mars is dead BradGuth Policy 20 September 18th 07 02:57 AM
Venus is alive, Mars is dead BradGuth History 20 September 18th 07 02:57 AM
Venus is alive, Mars is dead BradGuth UK Astronomy 20 September 18th 07 02:57 AM
Terraforming the moon, long before doing Mars or Venus Brad Guth Policy 21 March 4th 07 01:44 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 SpaceBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.