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Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.



 
 
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  #291  
Old July 21st 17, 01:15 AM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.physics,sci.electronics.design
Serg io[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10
Default Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

On 7/20/2017 6:54 PM, wrote:
On Thu, 20 Jul 2017 20:42:26 -0000,
wrote:

In sci.physics
wrote:
On Thu, 20 Jul 2017 11:34:24 -0400, Phil Hobbs
wrote:

On 07/20/2017 11:18 AM, Serg io wrote:
On 7/19/2017 11:56 PM, David Mitchell wrote:
wrote:
On Wed, 19 Jul 2017 05:08:56 +0100, David Mitchell


Uh, the widely varying properties, maybe? Titanium and gold have
slightly different properties.

Jimp posted a reference to a Wikipedia article. You really should
read it.
We can 3-D print *right now*:


Thermoplastics, eutectic metals, edible materials, Rubbers, Modeling
clay, Plasticine, Metal clay (including Precious Metal Clay), Ceramic
materials, Metal alloy, cermet, metal matrix composite, ceramic matrix
composite
Nylon or Nylon with short carbon fiber + reinforcement in the form
Carbon, Kevlar, Glass and Glass for high temperature fiber
Photopolymer,Photopolymer + thermally activated chemistry
Almost any metal alloy including Titanium alloys



why not print pizza.... ? should be a huge demand for that...

I saw a pancake printer at Makerfest a few years ago. The pancakes were
pretty good tasting too.

Why would you print, rather than extrude?


Some people are monomaniacal about 3D printing.


I guess the difference is the size of the dot. Pancakes are just a
big dot.


Pizza is a big dot, with smaller dots on it. embedded dots.
Ads
  #292  
Old July 21st 17, 01:38 AM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.physics,sci.electronics.design
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 47
Default Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

On Thu, 20 Jul 2017 19:15:20 -0500, Serg io
wrote:

On 7/20/2017 6:54 PM, wrote:
On Thu, 20 Jul 2017 20:42:26 -0000,
wrote:

In sci.physics
wrote:
On Thu, 20 Jul 2017 11:34:24 -0400, Phil Hobbs
wrote:

On 07/20/2017 11:18 AM, Serg io wrote:
On 7/19/2017 11:56 PM, David Mitchell wrote:
wrote:
On Wed, 19 Jul 2017 05:08:56 +0100, David Mitchell


Uh, the widely varying properties, maybe? Titanium and gold have
slightly different properties.

Jimp posted a reference to a Wikipedia article. You really should
read it.
We can 3-D print *right now*:


Thermoplastics, eutectic metals, edible materials, Rubbers, Modeling
clay, Plasticine, Metal clay (including Precious Metal Clay), Ceramic
materials, Metal alloy, cermet, metal matrix composite, ceramic matrix
composite
Nylon or Nylon with short carbon fiber + reinforcement in the form
Carbon, Kevlar, Glass and Glass for high temperature fiber
Photopolymer,Photopolymer + thermally activated chemistry
Almost any metal alloy including Titanium alloys



why not print pizza.... ? should be a huge demand for that...

I saw a pancake printer at Makerfest a few years ago. The pancakes were
pretty good tasting too.

Why would you print, rather than extrude?

Some people are monomaniacal about 3D printing.


I guess the difference is the size of the dot. Pancakes are just a
big dot.


Pizza is a big dot, with smaller dots on it. embedded dots.


Recursive dots.
  #293  
Old July 21st 17, 12:01 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.physics,sci.electronics.design
Jeff Findley[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,760
Default Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

In article , says...

On 7/19/2017 11:56 PM, David Mitchell wrote:
wrote:
On Wed, 19 Jul 2017 05:08:56 +0100, David Mitchell



Uh, the widely varying properties, maybe? Titanium and gold have
slightly different properties.


Jimp posted a reference to a Wikipedia article. You really should read it.
We can 3-D print *right now*:

Thermoplastics, eutectic metals, edible materials, Rubbers, Modeling
clay, Plasticine, Metal clay (including Precious Metal Clay), Ceramic
materials, Metal alloy, cermet, metal matrix composite, ceramic matrix
composite
Nylon or Nylon with short carbon fiber + reinforcement in the form
Carbon, Kevlar, Glass and Glass for high temperature fiber
Photopolymer,Photopolymer + thermally activated chemistry
Almost any metal alloy including Titanium alloys



why not print pizza.... ? should be a huge demand for that...


I believe this has already been done.

http://www.businessinsider.com/beehe...printer-2017-3

While not a printed pizza, the first "pizza ATM" was installed in my
state:

http://www.nbcnews.com/feature/colle...s-first-pizza-
atm-opens-xavier-university-cincinnati-n626501

If these things can be profitable anywhere, it's on college campuses.

Jeff
--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.
  #294  
Old July 21st 17, 01:00 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.physics,rec.arts.sf.science,sci.electronics.design
Robert Clark[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 245
Default Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

wrote in message ...
In sci.physics David Mitchell wrote:
...
Strati is little more than a $30,000 golf cart and the finish is an
abomination.


Not the point, remember the whole "mature technology" thing?
If we can do that *now*, imagine what we'll be able to do in 30 years
time.


Yes, it is the whole point.

They get speed by using thick layers as there is no other way to do it.
This
results in a crap finish.

And this IS an industrial grade printer.



A National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) noted this is a
problem with 3D-printing, that there is wide variation in results and
quality even in 3D-prints of objects by the same process:

NIST ADDRESSES METAL 3D PRINTER CHALLENGES WITH DIGITAL THREAD STRATEGY.
BEAU JACKSON 2017-07-17 8:17 PM
Quote:
In collaboration with Duck Bong Kim at Tennessee Technological University
(TTU), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has
published a study addressing three of the challenges to production-ready
metal 3D printing.
The proposed model could eventually form a standard for 3D printed metal
parts and aid additive manufacturing through the certification process –
often seen as a primary barrier to progress.
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/...rategy-118409/

They propose solutions based on a uniformity of the digital information
provided both before and after processing.

Bob Clark



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finally, nanotechnology can now fulfill its potential to revolutionize
21st-century technology, from the space elevator, to private, orbital
launchers, to 'flying cars'.
This crowdfunding campaign is to prove it:

Nanotech: from air to space.
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/n...ce/x/13319568/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--

  #295  
Old July 21st 17, 02:08 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.physics,rec.arts.sf.science,sci.electronics.design
Robert Clark[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 245
Default Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

wrote in message ...
In sci.physics David Mitchell wrote:
...
Strati is little more than a $30,000 golf cart and the finish is an
abomination.

Not the point, remember the whole "mature technology" thing?
If we can do that *now*, imagine what we'll be able to do in 30 years
time.


Yes, it is the whole point.

They get speed by using thick layers as there is no other way to do it.
This
results in a crap finish.

And this IS an industrial grade printer.



A National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) noted this is a
problem with 3D-printing, that there is wide variation in results and
quality even in 3D-prints of objects by the same process:

NIST ADDRESSES METAL 3D PRINTER CHALLENGES WITH DIGITAL THREAD STRATEGY.
BEAU JACKSON 2017-07-17 8:17 PM
Quote:
In collaboration with Duck Bong Kim at Tennessee Technological University
(TTU), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has
published a study addressing three of the challenges to production-ready
metal 3D printing.
The proposed model could eventually form a standard for 3D printed metal
parts and aid additive manufacturing through the certification process –
often seen as a primary barrier to progress.
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/...rategy-118409/

They propose solutions based on a uniformity of the digital information
provided both before and after processing.




On the other hand see this:

Navy Partnership Goes to New Depths with First 3D-Printed Submarine.
JULY 20, 2017
https://energy.gov/eere/articles/nav...nted-submarine

It's a 3D-printing of a carbon-fiber submarine hull. Judging by the video
the finish is quite smooth in this case, which would be required for a
submarine.


Bob Clark


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finally, nanotechnology can now fulfill its potential to revolutionize
21st-century technology, from the space elevator, to private, orbital
launchers, to 'flying cars'.
This crowdfunding campaign is to prove it:

Nanotech: from air to space.
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/n...ce/x/13319568/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--

  #296  
Old July 21st 17, 06:14 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.physics,rec.arts.sf.science,sci.electronics.design
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,346
Default Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

In sci.physics Robert Clark wrote:
wrote in message ...
In sci.physics David Mitchell wrote:
...
Strati is little more than a $30,000 golf cart and the finish is an
abomination.

Not the point, remember the whole "mature technology" thing?
If we can do that *now*, imagine what we'll be able to do in 30 years
time.

Yes, it is the whole point.

They get speed by using thick layers as there is no other way to do it.
This
results in a crap finish.

And this IS an industrial grade printer.



A National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) noted this is a
problem with 3D-printing, that there is wide variation in results and
quality even in 3D-prints of objects by the same process:

NIST ADDRESSES METAL 3D PRINTER CHALLENGES WITH DIGITAL THREAD STRATEGY.
BEAU JACKSON 2017-07-17 8:17 PM
Quote:
In collaboration with Duck Bong Kim at Tennessee Technological University
(TTU), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has
published a study addressing three of the challenges to production-ready
metal 3D printing.
The proposed model could eventually form a standard for 3D printed metal
parts and aid additive manufacturing through the certification process –
often seen as a primary barrier to progress.
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/...rategy-118409/

They propose solutions based on a uniformity of the digital information
provided both before and after processing.




On the other hand see this:

Navy Partnership Goes to New Depths with First 3D-Printed Submarine.
JULY 20, 2017
https://energy.gov/eere/articles/nav...nted-submarine

It's a 3D-printing of a carbon-fiber submarine hull. Judging by the video
the finish is quite smooth in this case, which would be required for a
submarine.


Exactly what a 3D printer is usefull for, a one off prototype.


--
Jim Pennino
  #297  
Old July 26th 17, 06:33 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.physics,rec.arts.sf.science,sci.electronics.design
Robert Clark[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 245
Default Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

An article from 2015:

3-D-printed car could hit streets next year. Chris Woodyard, USA TODAY 4:48
p.m. EST November 12, 2015
http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/...swim/75530830/

Several companies have come out with what they call "3D-printed" cars, but
none have 3D-printed the most important part, the engine.

This would be difficult to do with an internal combustion engine, with its
high temperatures, multiple moving parts, and high tolerances.

But it shouldn't be too difficult with an electric engine. In fact
considering there are now miniature 3D-printers on the market for the home,
an amateur could be the first to produce an entire, scale-size, 3D-printed
car.
And then it could be scaled up to produce a full-size, working, fully
3D-printed automobile.

This would revolutionize the industry, obviously.

The two most difficult parts would be the engine and the transmission.

This video shows how you can make your own simple electric motor:

How to Make an Electric Motor at Home - YouTube.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0p2QTE26VOA

Looking at the steps in the video, it appears they could all be
accomplished by 3D-printing.


Bob Clark

Just saw this:

SPEE3D Puts Supersonic Speed in Metal 3D Printing.
Michael Molitch-Hou posted on July 26, 2017
http://www.engineering.com/3DPrintin...-Printing.aspx

According to the company their method which uses high speed (supersonic)
jets to deposit the metal does not have the resolution of other metals so
they are focusing on applications where that is not required.


Bob Clark
--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Carbon nanotubes can revolutionize 21st-century technology IF they can be
made arbitrarily long while maintaining their strength.

Some proposals to accomplish that he

From Nanoscale to Macroscale: Applications of Nanotechnology to Production
of Bulk Ultra-Strong Materials.
American Journal of Nanomaterials.
Vol. 4, No. 2, 2016, pp 39-43. doi: 10.12691/ajn-4-2-2 | Research Article.
http://pubs.sciepub.com/ajn/4/2/2/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  #298  
Old July 26th 17, 06:58 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.physics,rec.arts.sf.science,sci.electronics.design
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,346
Default Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

In sci.physics Robert Clark wrote:
An article from 2015:


snip old crap

Just saw this:

SPEE3D Puts Supersonic Speed in Metal 3D Printing.
Michael Molitch-Hou posted on July 26, 2017
http://www.engineering.com/3DPrintin...-Printing.aspx

According to the company their method which uses high speed (supersonic)
jets to deposit the metal does not have the resolution of other metals so
they are focusing on applications where that is not required.


Bob Clark


Which means pretty much every part in a car couldn't be printed with this.

--
Jim Pennino
  #299  
Old July 26th 17, 07:08 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.physics,rec.arts.sf.science,sci.electronics.design
Robert Clark[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 245
Default Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

An article from 2015:

3-D-printed car could hit streets next year. Chris Woodyard, USA TODAY 4:48
p.m. EST November 12, 2015
http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/...swim/75530830/

Several companies have come out with what they call "3D-printed" cars, but
none have 3D-printed the most important part, the engine.

This would be difficult to do with an internal combustion engine, with its
high temperatures, multiple moving parts, and high tolerances.

But it shouldn't be too difficult with an electric engine. In fact
considering there are now miniature 3D-printers on the market for the home,
an amateur could be the first to produce an entire, scale-size, 3D-printed
car.
And then it could be scaled up to produce a full-size, working, fully
3D-printed automobile.

This would revolutionize the industry, obviously.

The two most difficult parts would be the engine and the transmission.

This video shows how you can make your own simple electric motor:

How to Make an Electric Motor at Home - YouTube.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0p2QTE26VOA

Looking at the steps in the video, it appears they could all be
accomplished by 3D-printing.


Bob Clark


And this is fast 3D printing in plastic on a conveyor belt:

3D Printing Big/Long Objects.
https://www.facebook.com/futurism/vi...5645552947979/

Could it be adapted to print metals?

Bob Clark

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Carbon nanotubes can revolutionize 21st-century technology IF they can be
made arbitrarily long
while maintaining their strength.

Some proposals to accomplish that he

From Nanoscale to Macroscale: Applications of Nanotechnology to Production
of Bulk Ultra-Strong Materials.
American Journal of Nanomaterials.
Vol. 4, No. 2, 2016, pp 39-43. doi: 10.12691/ajn-4-2-2 | Research Article.
http://pubs.sciepub.com/ajn/4/2/2/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--


  #300  
Old November 23rd 17, 04:14 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.physics,rec.arts.sf.science,sci.electronics.design
Albert van der Horst[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Towards the *fully* 3D-printed electric cars.

In article ,
wrote:
In sci.physics Fred J. McCall wrote:
wrote:


My estimate is that for all things manufactured parts that can be made
cheaper and faster by conventional means amount to about 99.99%.


And the world will only need 3 computers. Usual Chimp wisdom.


Kiss my ass Red Herring McTroll.

And about the only place where weight matters that much is in things
that fly and in that case useless mass is already gone from the design
without the expense of 3D printing.


That's why we use carbon fiber on cars; because weight doesn't matter.


"Where's the Affordable Carbon Fiber Automobile?"

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/5...er-automobile/

"While the cost of carbon fiber materials and production has declined
in recent decades, it remains prohibitive for anything but limited
applications in niche vehicles."


An other subjective quote from the same article:

"
But for the first time, a handful of 2016 models sold in neighborhood
car dealerships will feature ultralight yet expensive carbon fiber
materials.
"

A large part of the racing bikes sold in the Netherlands are carbon fiber.

So?

--
Jim Pennino


Groetjes Albert
--
Albert van der Horst, UTRECHT,THE NETHERLANDS
Economic growth -- being exponential -- ultimately falters.
&=n http://home.hccnet.nl/a.w.m.van.der.horst

 




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