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HST Reboost



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 19th 09, 12:50 PM posted to sci.space.shuttle
Albert Blauensteiner
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Posts: 13
Default HST Reboost

Why not reboost Hubble anyway if propellant permitting?

Albert
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  #2  
Old May 19th 09, 02:23 PM posted to sci.space.shuttle
Craig[_8_]
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Posts: 39
Default HST Reboost

Albert Blauensteiner wrote:

Why not reboost Hubble anyway if propellant permitting?


Good idea...
http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/331922main_s...kit_050609.pdf
.....After the work on Hubble is completed, Altman and Johnson will
oversee Atlantis’ reboost of the telescope to a higher altitude,
ensuring it will survive the tug of Earth’s gravity for the remainder of
its operational lifetime. A final decision on how much altitude will be
gained by the reboost will be dependent on Atlantis’ available
propellant.

  #3  
Old May 20th 09, 01:28 AM posted to sci.space.shuttle
Brian Thorn[_2_]
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Default HST Reboost

On Tue, 19 May 2009 08:23:09 -0500, Craig wrote:


Why not reboost Hubble anyway if propellant permitting?


Good idea...
http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/331922main_s...kit_050609.pdf
....After the work on Hubble is completed, Altman and Johnson will
oversee Atlantis’ reboost of the telescope to a higher altitude,
ensuring it will survive the tug of Earth’s gravity for the remainder of
its operational lifetime. A final decision on how much altitude will be
gained by the reboost will be dependent on Atlantis’ available
propellant.


The final decision was zero, made before flight. Instead, Atlantis
will lower its own orbit to reduce the risk of MMOD impacts.

Brian
  #4  
Old May 20th 09, 01:56 PM posted to sci.space.shuttle
Jessica[_5_]
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Posts: 13
Default HST Reboost

Craig wrote:
Albert Blauensteiner wrote:

Why not reboost Hubble anyway if propellant permitting?


Good idea...
http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/331922main_s...kit_050609.pdf
....After the work on Hubble is completed, Altman and Johnson will
oversee Atlantis’ reboost of the telescope to a higher altitude,
ensuring it will survive the tug of Earth’s gravity for the remainder of
its operational lifetime. A final decision on how much altitude will be
gained by the reboost will be dependent on Atlantis’ available
propellant.


No such re-boost of Hubble occurred on STS-125.
  #5  
Old May 20th 09, 05:21 PM posted to sci.space.shuttle
Craig[_8_]
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Posts: 39
Default HST Reboost

Brian Thorn wrote:

Instead, Atlantis
will lower its own orbit to reduce the risk of MMOD impacts.


lol

  #6  
Old May 20th 09, 06:49 PM posted to sci.space.shuttle
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 2,312
Default HST Reboost

I think one of the problems was that there is a lot of junk in slightly
higher orbits and it would be doubly silly to both risk an orbiter, and the
newly repaired Hubble by doing that, or at least that seems to be one of the
factors. Its a bit of, if it aint needed, why bother sort of thing.


Brian

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"Brian Thorn" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 19 May 2009 08:23:09 -0500, Craig wrote:


Why not reboost Hubble anyway if propellant permitting?


Good idea...
http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/331922main_s...kit_050609.pdf
....After the work on Hubble is completed, Altman and Johnson will
oversee Atlantis?T reboost of the telescope to a higher altitude,
ensuring it will survive the tug of Earth?Ts gravity for the remainder of
its operational lifetime. A final decision on how much altitude will be
gained by the reboost will be dependent on Atlantis?T available
propellant.


The final decision was zero, made before flight. Instead, Atlantis
will lower its own orbit to reduce the risk of MMOD impacts.

Brian



  #7  
Old May 21st 09, 12:57 PM posted to sci.space.shuttle
Craig[_8_]
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Posts: 39
Default HST Reboost

Brian Gaff wrote:

I think one of the problems was that there is a lot of junk in
slightly higher orbits and it would be doubly silly to both risk an
orbiter, and the newly repaired Hubble by doing that, or at least that
seems to be one of the factors. Its a bit of, if it aint needed, why
bother sort of thing.


lol, Brian, Brian is joking.

The alternative if he is not, is that NASA is the joke. You don't have
to try to explain the joke. There are no humans on the Hubble, and the
time to take it up and drop it off is very, very short. Just a little
bit longer than astronauts going to the moon will have to spend at that
altitude. They won't be able to go to the moon if they are worried about
the Orbiter dropping the Hubble off at a slightly higher altitude.

Maybe it's sabotage, by some passive-aggressive mid level manager who
didn't what to repair the Hubble. Snickering, "So there, you got your
Hubble repair mission, but I'll have the last laugh as the fully
functional Hubble spreads debris across Africa."

lol



 




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