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Moon key to space future?



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 24th 03, 01:38 AM
James White
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Default Moon key to space future?

Dick Morris
Yes, I know, the market is the ultimate answer for every problem.


Unfortunately not every problem. Take spam, for instance. Is there any
market solution that could work?

Farming is such a small part of the economy that we should just do away
with it and turn the land over to more economically productive uses.


This shows a fundamental misunderstanding of economics. Economics re change
is always a margin issue. If today the marginal value of land is higher for
housing that DOES NOT mean that tomorrow it won't be the other way around.

Extraordinary markets require extraordinary launch vehicles. You're
putting the cart before the horse.


No, the original was exactly correct. Even for a lone inventor toiling to
make the extraordinary launch vehicle----though he/she FAILS---was still "a
market" for the vehicle and willing to pay the price.

--

James E. White
Inventor, Marketer, and Author of "Will It Sell?
How to Determine If Your Invention Is Profitably Marketable
(Before Wasting Money on a Patent)" www.willitsell.com
Also: www.booksforinventors.com and www.idearights.com
[Follow sig link for email addr.Replies go to spam bit-bucket]





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  #2  
Old November 24th 03, 02:48 AM
Rand Simberg
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Default Moon key to space future?

On Mon, 24 Nov 2003 01:38:55 GMT, in a place far, far away, "James
White" made the phosphor on my monitor
glow in such a way as to indicate that:

Dick Morris
Yes, I know, the market is the ultimate answer for every problem.


Unfortunately not every problem. Take spam, for instance. Is there any
market solution that could work?


Yes, but it would require revamping the internet.

--
simberg.interglobal.org * 310 372-7963 (CA) 307 739-1296 (Jackson Hole)
interglobal space lines * 307 733-1715 (Fax) http://www.interglobal.org

"Extraordinary launch vehicles require extraordinary markets..."
Swap the first . and @ and throw out the ".trash" to email me.
Here's my email address for autospammers:
  #3  
Old November 24th 03, 06:57 PM
Dave O'Neill
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Default Moon key to space future?


"Rand Simberg" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 24 Nov 2003 01:38:55 GMT, in a place far, far away, "James
White" made the phosphor on my monitor
glow in such a way as to indicate that:

Dick Morris
Yes, I know, the market is the ultimate answer for every problem.


Unfortunately not every problem. Take spam, for instance. Is there any
market solution that could work?


Yes, but it would require revamping the internet.


I could introduce you to some mobile network operators who think they can do
just that.

Dave

  #4  
Old November 25th 03, 04:22 AM
TKalbfus
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Default Moon key to space future?

Unfortunately not every problem. Take spam, for instance. Is there any
market solution that could work?


Yes there is. Go to the supermarket, take down a can of spam and bring it to
the checkout counter.

Tom
  #5  
Old November 25th 03, 04:29 AM
TKalbfus
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Default Moon key to space future?

Why wait for the rest of the world to fix its problems?

I've no idea what you're talking about. What do you mean, "wait"?


The World's problems are one of the motivations for travelling in space in the
first place, that is to get away from them. If we solve all the world's
problems we have no reason to leave Earth! Lets take a few examples:

Overcrowding: If we solve this problem, we have no reason to move into space in
seach of new territories.

Energy: If we solve this problem there is no reason to build SPSs or the space
colonies to support them, because we will have already solved this problem.
(The assumption being that we have waited for all the world's problems to be
solved, energy is one of them.)

War: The is no motivation to migrate into space to escape war if this problem
has been solved.

Space travel can be part of the solution to the problems, but if we wait until
all the world's problems are solved before going into space well...

Tom
  #6  
Old November 25th 03, 06:19 AM
Hop David
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Default Moon key to space future?



James White wrote:
Dick Morris
Yes, I know, the market is the ultimate answer for every problem.



Unfortunately not every problem. Take spam, for instance. Is there any
market solution that could work?



Get British intelligence to say spammers have weapons of mass destruction.

Then Bush will jam guided missiles up their butts.

I know it's not a market solution, but I still like it.

--
Hop David
http://clowder.net/hop/index.html

  #7  
Old November 25th 03, 04:09 PM
James Nicoll
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Default Moon key to space future?

In article ,
TKalbfus wrote:
Why wait for the rest of the world to fix its problems?


I've no idea what you're talking about. What do you mean, "wait"?


The World's problems are one of the motivations for travelling in space in the
first place, that is to get away from them. If we solve all the world's
problems we have no reason to leave Earth! Lets take a few examples:

Overcrowding: If we solve this problem, we have no reason to move into space in
seach of new territories.


Actually, I have an idea for this.

Rather than confining ourselves to the surface of the Earth,
we could build what I like to call Habitation Or Utility Storage
Environments, Stacked or HOUSES. By piling one level on another
we could effectively multipy the surface of the Earth many times
over. If a given region is crowded now, we could build many very
tall HOUSESes, so tall as to apparently 'scrape the sky' to create
a local expansion of available surface area. I imagine dozens of
people could live in these scrapesky buildings.

Energy: If we solve this problem there is no reason to build SPSs or the space
colonies to support them, because we will have already solved this problem.
(The assumption being that we have waited for all the world's problems to be
solved, energy is one of them.)


Actually, this could drive space exploitation. Cheap sources of
energy on Earth means more heat and at some point more heat will become
inconvenient.

War: The is no motivation to migrate into space to escape war if this problem
has been solved.


Judging by what happened in the great wars of the past (WWII,
WWI, Napoleonic and Seven Years) the colonies would still be entangled
in terrestrial conflicts. WWn might even be triggered out there.

Anyone remember the family who wanted to avoid WWIII, so they
moved to the safest place on Earth, the Falklands?

--
It's amazing how the waterdrops form: a ball of water with an air bubble
inside it and inside of that one more bubble of water. It looks so beautiful
[...]. I realized something: the world is interesting for the man who can
be surprised. -Valentin Lebedev-
  #8  
Old November 26th 03, 02:18 AM
Terrell Miller
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Default Moon key to space future?

"Hop David" wrote in message
...


James White wrote:
Dick Morris
Yes, I know, the market is the ultimate answer for every problem.



Unfortunately not every problem. Take spam, for instance. Is there any
market solution that could work?



Get British intelligence to say spammers have weapons of mass destruction.

Then Bush will jam guided missiles up their butts.

I know it's not a market solution, but I still like it.



I like Spam

--
Terrell Miller


"Very often, a 'free' feestock will still lead to a very expensive system.
One that is quite likely noncompetitive"
- Don Lancaster


  #9  
Old November 26th 03, 05:30 AM
TKalbfus
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Default Moon key to space future?

Judging by what happened in the great wars of the past (WWII,
WWI, Napoleonic and Seven Years) the colonies would still be entangled
in terrestrial conflicts. WWn might even be triggered out there.


Depends on how far away they are, if its too remote, it might not be worth the
efforts of the combatants to entangle them in their conflicts. The Solar System
is a big place.
  #10  
Old November 26th 03, 05:02 PM
James Nicoll
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Posts: n/a
Default Moon key to space future?

In article ,
TKalbfus wrote:
Judging by what happened in the great wars of the past (WWII,
WWI, Napoleonic and Seven Years) the colonies would still be entangled
in terrestrial conflicts. WWn might even be triggered out there.


Depends on how far away they are, if its too remote, it might not be worth the
efforts of the combatants to entangle them in their conflicts. The Solar System
is a big place.


Some fairly remote places found themselves affected by the various
Great Wars. The trading posts in Hudson's Bay, for example, which were as
close to the back of beyond as one might like, found it extremely inconvenient
when their supply ships got nailed en route during one of the Anglo-French
disagreements because (among other things) it meant there were no trade goods
for the natives, who settled down to wait next to the posts, getting
increasingly peeved with the traders as time went by.

Unless we're talking Hermit Kingdoms in the Kuiper, at the very
least a Great War should have trade implications for the colonies, as
the effects ripple out from the warzone. Even back when the Earth was years
around in travel time, remote Spanish colonies got harrassed by the English.
Immunity seems to require a total disconnect, and even there you might
get effects like China shoving at one side of the Central Asian Nomadic
Barbarian Repository and Rome experiencing a slight westward shift on their
side of the CENBR, without the two powers being in any direct contact.


--
It's amazing how the waterdrops form: a ball of water with an air bubble
inside it and inside of that one more bubble of water. It looks so beautiful
[...]. I realized something: the world is interesting for the man who can
be surprised. -Valentin Lebedev-
 




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