A Space & astronomy forum. SpaceBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » SpaceBanter.com forum » Space Science » History
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Debbie Reynolds and Space History



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old January 29th 17, 10:40 AM posted to sci.space.history
Fred J. McCall[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,295
Default Debbie Reynolds and Space History

Stuf4 wrote:

From David Spain:
On 1/13/2017 5:06 PM, Jeff Findley wrote:
Since Debbie Reynolds died a couple of weeks ago, I have not seen
anyone talking about her connection with space history.

I personally have no idea what you're talking about. Please enlighten
us.

She starred in "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" on Broadway. The play was
the inspiration for Gus Grissom calling Gemini 3 Molly Brown.

I forgot about that. Pretty thin connection though. Because of what
happened to his Mercury capsule, the name "The Unsinkable Molly Brown"
didn't go over very well with the people in charge of publicity within
NASA. It just served to remind the public that his Mercury capsule was
still at the bottom of the ocean.


The thesis that Debbie Reynolds played a significant role in space
history outside of her performing in "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" just
does not hold water.

FWIW the popular 60's musical is about the irascible survivor of the
Titanic's maiden voyage, the nouveau riche Ms. Molly Brown.


This forum has been amazingly consistent in a lack of open-minded thinking. Without even hearing the thesis, it is rejected outright.


This isn't a 'forum' and it doesn't take much detail to be able to
identify silly ideas.


--
"Some people get lost in thought because it's such unfamiliar
territory."
--G. Behn
Ads
  #12  
Old February 3rd 17, 12:56 PM posted to sci.space.history
Stuf4
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 505
Default Debbie Reynolds and Space History

From Fred McCall:
Stuf4 wrote:

From David Spain:
On 1/13/2017 5:06 PM, Jeff Findley wrote:
Since Debbie Reynolds died a couple of weeks ago, I have not seen
anyone talking about her connection with space history.

I personally have no idea what you're talking about. Please enlighten
us.

She starred in "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" on Broadway. The play was
the inspiration for Gus Grissom calling Gemini 3 Molly Brown.

I forgot about that. Pretty thin connection though. Because of what
happened to his Mercury capsule, the name "The Unsinkable Molly Brown"
didn't go over very well with the people in charge of publicity within
NASA. It just served to remind the public that his Mercury capsule was
still at the bottom of the ocean.


The thesis that Debbie Reynolds played a significant role in space
history outside of her performing in "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" just
does not hold water.

FWIW the popular 60's musical is about the irascible survivor of the
Titanic's maiden voyage, the nouveau riche Ms. Molly Brown.


This forum has been amazingly consistent in a lack of open-minded thinking. Without even hearing the thesis, it is rejected outright.


This isn't a 'forum' and it doesn't take much detail to be able to
identify silly ideas.


Plate tectonics was laughed at as a silly idea. Long before that, the notion of the Earth being round was likewise scoffed at as ridiculous. No one felt much need to look beyond the horizon to see with absolute certainty that the Earth was flat.


Sticking just to space history, there are fundamental things I have shared here on this forum long ago that were ridiculed by even the most well-respected authors in this field, yet today are presented within the mainstream as obvious.

I don't expect any of these facts to change anyone's behavior. It is fully characteristic of the human psyche to get into "mind ruts" where artificial limitations on understanding and action become self-imposed.


....and this is the *very thing* that killed Gus Grissom and his crew 50 years ago last week. He and his fellow astronauts got habituated to not taking action when there were clear signs that action was needed to be taken.

Debbie was a critical step in that process that led to their death.


In the past, an approach I have taken on this forum when it has been clear that the vocal majority has no interest, even to the point of a steeply negative appreciation for things I share, I will post anyway for the potential benefit of an unmeasurable number of people who may visit here who might have a much more open-minded approach to information that doesn't conform to their current set of beliefs. And this approach has clearly paid major dividends in past efforts. Today when I hear people like Neil deGrasse Tyson share his view of what drove the space race as though it was an understanding he had his entire life, I know that such persistent efforts are worthwhile.

It is not hard for me to imagine future generations who will have a clear understanding of how Debbie Reynolds is connected with the demise of the Apollo 1 crew ...no matter how much this notion may be scoffed at today.

~ CT
  #13  
Old February 3rd 17, 02:01 PM posted to sci.space.history
Dean Markley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 424
Default Debbie Reynolds and Space History

On Friday, February 3, 2017 at 6:56:43 AM UTC-5, Stuf4 wrote:
From Fred McCall:
Stuf4 wrote:

From David Spain:
On 1/13/2017 5:06 PM, Jeff Findley wrote:
Since Debbie Reynolds died a couple of weeks ago, I have not seen
anyone talking about her connection with space history.

I personally have no idea what you're talking about. Please enlighten
us.

She starred in "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" on Broadway. The play was
the inspiration for Gus Grissom calling Gemini 3 Molly Brown.

I forgot about that. Pretty thin connection though. Because of what
happened to his Mercury capsule, the name "The Unsinkable Molly Brown"
didn't go over very well with the people in charge of publicity within
NASA. It just served to remind the public that his Mercury capsule was
still at the bottom of the ocean.

The thesis that Debbie Reynolds played a significant role in space
history outside of her performing in "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" just
does not hold water.

FWIW the popular 60's musical is about the irascible survivor of the
Titanic's maiden voyage, the nouveau riche Ms. Molly Brown.

This forum has been amazingly consistent in a lack of open-minded thinking. Without even hearing the thesis, it is rejected outright.


This isn't a 'forum' and it doesn't take much detail to be able to
identify silly ideas.


Plate tectonics was laughed at as a silly idea. Long before that, the notion of the Earth being round was likewise scoffed at as ridiculous. No one felt much need to look beyond the horizon to see with absolute certainty that the Earth was flat.


Sticking just to space history, there are fundamental things I have shared here on this forum long ago that were ridiculed by even the most well-respected authors in this field, yet today are presented within the mainstream as obvious.

I don't expect any of these facts to change anyone's behavior. It is fully characteristic of the human psyche to get into "mind ruts" where artificial limitations on understanding and action become self-imposed.


...and this is the *very thing* that killed Gus Grissom and his crew 50 years ago last week. He and his fellow astronauts got habituated to not taking action when there were clear signs that action was needed to be taken.

Debbie was a critical step in that process that led to their death.


In the past, an approach I have taken on this forum when it has been clear that the vocal majority has no interest, even to the point of a steeply negative appreciation for things I share, I will post anyway for the potential benefit of an unmeasurable number of people who may visit here who might have a much more open-minded approach to information that doesn't conform to their current set of beliefs. And this approach has clearly paid major dividends in past efforts. Today when I hear people like Neil deGrasse Tyson share his view of what drove the space race as though it was an understanding he had his entire life, I know that such persistent efforts are worthwhile.

It is not hard for me to imagine future generations who will have a clear understanding of how Debbie Reynolds is connected with the demise of the Apollo 1 crew ...no matter how much this notion may be scoffed at today.

~ CT


You are free to believe anything you wish. But that doesn't mean its true nor do the rest of us have to agree. What you are suggesting is similar to chaos theory: A butterfly flapping it's wings in Florida will trigger a tropical storm off the coast of Africa.
  #14  
Old February 4th 17, 03:25 AM posted to sci.space.history
Fred J. McCall[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,295
Default Debbie Reynolds and Space History

Stuf4 wrote:

From Fred McCall:
Stuf4 wrote:

From David Spain:
On 1/13/2017 5:06 PM, Jeff Findley wrote:
Since Debbie Reynolds died a couple of weeks ago, I have not seen
anyone talking about her connection with space history.

I personally have no idea what you're talking about. Please enlighten
us.

She starred in "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" on Broadway. The play was
the inspiration for Gus Grissom calling Gemini 3 Molly Brown.

I forgot about that. Pretty thin connection though. Because of what
happened to his Mercury capsule, the name "The Unsinkable Molly Brown"
didn't go over very well with the people in charge of publicity within
NASA. It just served to remind the public that his Mercury capsule was
still at the bottom of the ocean.

The thesis that Debbie Reynolds played a significant role in space
history outside of her performing in "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" just
does not hold water.

FWIW the popular 60's musical is about the irascible survivor of the
Titanic's maiden voyage, the nouveau riche Ms. Molly Brown.

This forum has been amazingly consistent in a lack of open-minded thinking. Without even hearing the thesis, it is rejected outright.


This isn't a 'forum' and it doesn't take much detail to be able to
identify silly ideas.


Plate tectonics was laughed at as a silly idea.


Apples and aardvarks. BZZZttttt! Thanks for playing.


...and this is the *very thing* that killed Gus Grissom and his crew 50 years ago last week. He and his fellow astronauts got habituated to not taking action when there were clear signs that action was needed to be taken.

Debbie was a critical step in that process that led to their death.


Absolute idiocy.


--
"Ordinarily he is insane. But he has lucid moments when he is
only stupid."
-- Heinrich Heine
  #15  
Old February 4th 17, 05:20 PM posted to sci.space.history
Jeff Findley[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,347
Default Debbie Reynolds and Space History

In article ,
says...
You are free to believe anything you wish. But that doesn't mean
its true nor do the rest of us have to agree. What you are
suggesting is similar to chaos theory: A butterfly flapping it's
wings in Florida will trigger a tropical storm off the coast of
Africa.


Agreed. But even if we accept that theory as true, what people miss
about "the butterfly effect" is that every other variable has to be
exactly correct in order for the butterfly to matter in the first place.
Instead, people like to point to it as an example of "one person can
make a difference" and they use it as a motivational talking point. The
butterfly effect is a great little story if you're trying to motivate
people.

But, in the real world, Debbie Reynolds really had nothing to do with
the space program. The credit goes to the politicians who funded it
"blank check" style in the early 1960's and to the thousands of people
that actually worked on the program and were paid from that huge pool of
money.

Jeff
--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.
  #17  
Old February 11th 17, 12:49 PM posted to sci.space.history
richard
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Debbie Reynolds and Space History



Jeff Findley wrote:

In article ,
says...
You are free to believe anything you wish. But that doesn't mean
its true nor do the rest of us have to agree. What you are
suggesting is similar to chaos theory: A butterfly flapping it's
wings in Florida will trigger a tropical storm off the coast of
Africa.


Agreed. But even if we accept that theory as true, what people miss
about "the butterfly effect" is that every other variable has to be
exactly correct in order for the butterfly to matter in the first place.
Instead, people like to point to it as an example of "one person can
make a difference" and they use it as a motivational talking point. The
butterfly effect is a great little story if you're trying to motivate
people.

But, in the real world, Debbie Reynolds really had nothing to do with
the space program. The credit goes to the politicians who funded it
"blank check" style in the early 1960's and to the thousands of people
that actually worked on the program and were paid from that huge pool of
money.

Jeff
--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.


As far as Stuf4 post I think he deserves an honorary Dirk Gently Detective
badge for his original supposition.
As far a casually dismissing the "the butterfly effect" or "one person can
make a difference" (which are actually two very different theories) the
relationship between the actress who played 7 of 9 on ST:Voyager modesty and
the Affordable Care Act is a good example of both theories.



  #18  
Old February 11th 17, 03:23 PM posted to sci.space.history
Jeff Findley[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,347
Default Debbie Reynolds and Space History

In article ,
says...

Jeff Findley wrote:

Agreed. But even if we accept that theory as true, what people miss
about "the butterfly effect" is that every other variable has to be
exactly correct in order for the butterfly to matter in the first place.
Instead, people like to point to it as an example of "one person can
make a difference" and they use it as a motivational talking point. The
butterfly effect is a great little story if you're trying to motivate
people.

But, in the real world, Debbie Reynolds really had nothing to do with
the space program. The credit goes to the politicians who funded it
"blank check" style in the early 1960's and to the thousands of people
that actually worked on the program and were paid from that huge pool of
money.


As far as Stuf4 post I think he deserves an honorary Dirk Gently Detective
badge for his original supposition.
As far a casually dismissing the "the butterfly effect" or "one person can
make a difference" (which are actually two very different theories) the
relationship between the actress who played 7 of 9 on ST:Voyager modesty and
the Affordable Care Act is a good example of both theories.


I'm not sure that Jeri Ryan had much of anything to do with the ACA, but
I'm willing to entertain this notion if you can find a cite. A quick
Google search turned up nothing for me.

But again, I'd like to emphasize that the conditions have to be just
right for that one person to make a difference and/or that one person
has to be special in some way (e.g. an easily recognized Hollywood
celebrity).

What you normally have is many people united to accomplish a certain
goal with one person (or several people) who becomes a leader and/or
figurehead of "the movement". Yes that one person is important (e.g.
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.), but even when that person is removed from
the movement (e.g. his assassination), it does not necessarily mean the
movement dies right then and there. This is because the movement is
bigger, and the support is stronger, than just the people leading it.

Jeff
--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.
  #19  
Old February 16th 17, 04:51 PM posted to sci.space.history
Damien Valentine
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 272
Default Debbie Reynolds and Space History

On Saturday, January 14, 2017 at 4:14:44 AM UTC-5, Stuf4 wrote:

A book can be written on this topic. Literally an entire book.


Then write it. Because it looks like all you're doing right now is posting improbable conspiracy theories -- about Debbie Reynolds, of all people! -- on a part of the Internet that hardly anyone visits anymore. If you want to be seen as something besides a run-of-the-mill kook...you have to act like something besides a run-of-the-mill kook.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
if you'll enforce Debbie's jungle with leafs, it'll there expect the sand Abdullah Fahd Al Taee Amateur Astronomy 0 December 30th 07 01:08 AM
Just suspecting amongst a headache in short the committee is too structural for Debbie to carry it. Oris[_2_] Amateur Astronomy 0 November 14th 07 07:56 AM
stem individually compiles Debbie's psychology Saad Youssef Allawi Amateur Astronomy 0 August 15th 07 06:20 AM
If you'll kick Debbie's stadium with dryers, it'll biweekly irrigate the pitcher. Stu Astronomy Misc 0 June 27th 06 08:22 AM
Doug Reynolds Completes His Dream Scope Dawn Baird-Chleborad Amateur Astronomy 6 February 24th 05 07:09 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 SpaceBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.