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Venus probes. Even really possible?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 23rd 19, 05:23 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
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Posts: 1,076
Default Venus probes. Even really possible?

If they intend to do seismology, they'll need a probe that can do it and withstand the conditions on the planet for a period of time. Is it even possible? Wouldn't another basic observational probe be a good idea? It's been 40 years or so since the Russians landed one on the surface and took pictures.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47672736

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  #2  
Old March 23rd 19, 05:33 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Chris L Peterson
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Posts: 10,007
Default Venus probes. Even really possible?

On Sat, 23 Mar 2019 09:23:10 -0700 (PDT), RichA
wrote:

If they intend to do seismology, they'll need a probe that can do it and withstand the conditions on the planet for a period of time. Is it even possible? Wouldn't another basic observational probe be a good idea? It's been 40 years or so since the Russians landed one on the surface and took pictures.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47672736


Did you even read the article? The proposal is to study this via an
orbital radar system. There's no suggestion of a surface lander.
  #3  
Old March 23rd 19, 06:38 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Vladimir Rodionov
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Posts: 1
Default Venus probes. Even really possible?

On Sunday, March 24, 2019 at 12:33:18 AM UTC+8, Chris L Peterson wrote:
On Sat, 23 Mar 2019 09:23:10 -0700 (PDT), RichA
wrote:

If they intend to do seismology, they'll need a probe that can do it and withstand the conditions on the planet for a period of time. Is it even possible? Wouldn't another basic observational probe be a good idea? It's been 40 years or so since the Russians landed one on the surface and took pictures.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47672736


Did you even read the article? The proposal is to study this via an
orbital radar system. There's no suggestion of a surface lander.


There is another proposed Venus mission that includes a lander
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venera-D
  #4  
Old March 24th 19, 01:54 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
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Posts: 1,076
Default Venus probes. Even really possible?

On Saturday, 23 March 2019 12:33:18 UTC-4, Chris L Peterson wrote:
On Sat, 23 Mar 2019 09:23:10 -0700 (PDT), RichA
wrote:

If they intend to do seismology, they'll need a probe that can do it and withstand the conditions on the planet for a period of time. Is it even possible? Wouldn't another basic observational probe be a good idea? It's been 40 years or so since the Russians landed one on the surface and took pictures.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47672736


Did you even read the article? The proposal is to study this via an
orbital radar system. There's no suggestion of a surface lander.


How utterly...dull.
  #5  
Old March 24th 19, 01:57 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
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Posts: 1,076
Default Venus probes. Even really possible?

On Saturday, 23 March 2019 13:38:16 UTC-4, Vladimir Rodionov wrote:
On Sunday, March 24, 2019 at 12:33:18 AM UTC+8, Chris L Peterson wrote:
On Sat, 23 Mar 2019 09:23:10 -0700 (PDT), RichA
wrote:

If they intend to do seismology, they'll need a probe that can do it and withstand the conditions on the planet for a period of time. Is it even possible? Wouldn't another basic observational probe be a good idea? It's been 40 years or so since the Russians landed one on the surface and took pictures.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47672736


Did you even read the article? The proposal is to study this via an
orbital radar system. There's no suggestion of a surface lander.


There is another proposed Venus mission that includes a lander
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venera-D


That's encouraging. Meanwhile, what's left of NASA can keep begging Russia or Space-X to launch people to the worthless ISS or launch more satellites to study "Earth's weather."
  #6  
Old March 24th 19, 02:05 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Chris L Peterson
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Posts: 10,007
Default Venus probes. Even really possible?

On Sat, 23 Mar 2019 17:54:57 -0700 (PDT), RichA
wrote:

On Saturday, 23 March 2019 12:33:18 UTC-4, Chris L Peterson wrote:
On Sat, 23 Mar 2019 09:23:10 -0700 (PDT), RichA
wrote:

If they intend to do seismology, they'll need a probe that can do it and withstand the conditions on the planet for a period of time. Is it even possible? Wouldn't another basic observational probe be a good idea? It's been 40 years or so since the Russians landed one on the surface and took pictures.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47672736


Did you even read the article? The proposal is to study this via an
orbital radar system. There's no suggestion of a surface lander.


How utterly...dull.


Except that an orbiter will return vastly more information about
Venus's tectonics than any lander we can build.
  #7  
Old March 24th 19, 07:11 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Ninapenda Jibini
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Posts: 31
Default Venus probes. Even really possible?

RichA wrote in
:

If they intend to do seismology, they'll need a probe that can
do it and withstand the conditions on the planet for a period of
time. Is it even possible?


Depends on which New Horizons missions get funded.

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017...omputer-chips-
scientists-are-ready-return-hell-venus

https://tinyurl.com/y53nyjn7

The longest test so far has been 33 days without any problems under
the best simulation of Venus' atmosphere we can produce on Earth.
But, while it's not mentioned in this article, that was the limit
of how long the test environment could run, not the limit of the
materials being tested.

So, yeah, it looks like it just might be possible. Just because
you're not smart enough to figure out how to do it doesn't mean
nobody else is. Especially considering that virtually all of
humanity is smarter than you.

--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
  #8  
Old March 24th 19, 06:45 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,076
Default Venus probes. Even really possible?

On Saturday, 23 March 2019 21:05:57 UTC-4, Chris L Peterson wrote:
On Sat, 23 Mar 2019 17:54:57 -0700 (PDT), RichA
wrote:

On Saturday, 23 March 2019 12:33:18 UTC-4, Chris L Peterson wrote:
On Sat, 23 Mar 2019 09:23:10 -0700 (PDT), RichA
wrote:

If they intend to do seismology, they'll need a probe that can do it and withstand the conditions on the planet for a period of time. Is it even possible? Wouldn't another basic observational probe be a good idea? It's been 40 years or so since the Russians landed one on the surface and took pictures.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47672736

Did you even read the article? The proposal is to study this via an
orbital radar system. There's no suggestion of a surface lander.


How utterly...dull.


Except that an orbiter will return vastly more information about
Venus's tectonics than any lander we can build.


Which is why of course all seismographic monitoring on Earth was ended decades ago and now we rely solely on satellites...well, not really.
  #9  
Old March 24th 19, 06:46 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,076
Default Venus probes. Even really possible?

On Sunday, 24 March 2019 02:11:28 UTC-4, Ninapenda Jibini wrote:
RichA wrote in
:

If they intend to do seismology, they'll need a probe that can
do it and withstand the conditions on the planet for a period of
time. Is it even possible?


Depends on which New Horizons missions get funded.

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017...omputer-chips-
scientists-are-ready-return-hell-venus

https://tinyurl.com/y53nyjn7

The longest test so far has been 33 days without any problems under
the best simulation of Venus' atmosphere we can produce on Earth.
But, while it's not mentioned in this article, that was the limit
of how long the test environment could run, not the limit of the
materials being tested.

So, yeah, it looks like it just might be possible. Just because
you're not smart enough to figure out how to do it doesn't mean
nobody else is. Especially considering that virtually all of
humanity is smarter than you.


Apparently, you weren't smart enough to actually read the subject line carefully.
 




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