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50-page brochure (Russian and English) about Progress M50



 
 
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  #11  
Old August 12th 04, 09:02 PM
bob haller
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Default 50-page brochure (Russian and English) about Progress M50


However bob is more interested in the appearance (replacing badly
needed supplies with luxury items) than the reality ('luxury' items
that help keep the crew sane).



Ahh if some minor component fails I will restart this discussion. morale is
definetely important but currently the station is in emergency mode without
shuttle supplies
HAVE A GREAT DAY!
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  #12  
Old August 13th 04, 07:02 AM
Joseph Nebus
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Default 50-page brochure (Russian and English) about Progress M50

Andrew Gray writes:

Anecdotally, the first Skylab crew were told that thanks to the fact
they were using a S-V launch, weight restrictions were flexible; there
would be an allocation of a couple of hundred pounds for entertainment
items and the like, and did they have any suggestions?


They were shortly asked for any *other* suggestions...


My recollection is one of the crews did that anyway -- that is,
they had one of the astronaut's wives record a few lines of conversation
such as, ``Oh, we were just observing the fires in California,'' ``I've
just been trying to keep out of the way'' and ``Now I've got to run, the
boys are coming back'' and played a fairly coherent conversation to a
baffled Mission Control.

(They recorded several possible ``observing natural events''
openers, on the assumption that *sometime* during the flight there'd be
fires in California or a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico or so.)

Unfortunately I don't find a reference offhand ... but it is one
of the greater space pranks played.

--
Joseph Nebus
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  #13  
Old August 13th 04, 03:15 PM
Jeff Findley
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Default 50-page brochure (Russian and English) about Progress M50


"bob haller" wrote in message
...
However bob is more interested in the appearance (replacing badly
needed supplies with luxury items) than the reality ('luxury' items
that help keep the crew sane).


Ahh if some minor component fails I will restart this discussion. morale

is
definetely important but currently the station is in emergency mode

without
shuttle supplies


You sound like you should be writing for the National Enquirer or some other
trashy paper.

Your personal opinion isn't worth much when compared to people with real
space station experience (the Russians) or even when compared to others here
who have had experience being deployed on ships for long periods of time.

Jeff
--
Remove icky phrase from email address to get a valid address.



  #15  
Old August 14th 04, 11:26 AM
Andrew Gray
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Default 50-page brochure (Russian and English) about Progress M50

On 2004-08-12, bob haller wrote:

However bob is more interested in the appearance (replacing badly
needed supplies with luxury items) than the reality ('luxury' items
that help keep the crew sane).


Ahh if some minor component fails I will restart this discussion. morale is
definetely important but currently the station is in emergency mode without
shuttle supplies


Delightful though the idea is, ISS minor components are not identical
small mechanical bits; the term covers pretty much half the mass of the
station, a truly scary number of different devices, many of them
essentually unique (and most critical you-die-in-minutes-if-this-breaks
hardware with, I believe, some form of spares or backup). Things break
on ISS all the time; they send the faulty bits back (as with the
glovebox) or wait for new hardware to be sent up.

Do you really think that "sending up minor components" is a rational
thing to do without knowing what you need? All the spare EMU gloves in
the world won't help if your problem is with an ECLSS flowline
somewhere, and an extra screwdriver is a poor substitute for a monkey
wrench. It's a foolish argument - by this logic, all flight space would
be spare components, because something might break somewhere and you'd
have to fly it up later otherwise.

--
-Andrew Gray

  #16  
Old August 14th 04, 10:21 PM
hop
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Default

"Jim Oberg" wrote in message ...
FYI:


A very handsome 50-page brochure (Russian and English) about Progress M50
and background
can be downloaded in pdf form from
http://www.federalspace.ru/video/Progress_M50_www.pdf

Specific mission details (in Russian) can be read at
http://www.federalspace.ru/Start1Show.asp?STARTID=574

JimO
www.jamesoberg.com

Nice find.

Far more interesting than the fact the ISS crew get magazines and DVDs
to me was the Soyuz LV upgrade timeline. While the aurora/onega stuff
seems likely to be viewgraph engineering, the Soyuz 2A and 2B and
perhaps the Kourou pad seem to be fairly firm. Anyone know if this is
true, or just more 'if we had the money' dreaming ?

Incidently, the Soyouz 2B gives an extra 1000kg to LEO from Baikonur,
which should be plenty for extra heat sheild that the seemingly
implausible CSI http://www.constellationservices.com/ plan would
require. Hmmm...

It is also interesting to see the same LV gets about 2.5x the payload
to geostationary from Kourou compaired Baikonur. That should provide
an attractive option for medium sized GEO sats.
  #17  
Old August 14th 04, 10:21 PM
hop
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Jim Oberg" wrote in message ...
FYI:


A very handsome 50-page brochure (Russian and English) about Progress M50
and background
can be downloaded in pdf form from
http://www.federalspace.ru/video/Progress_M50_www.pdf

Specific mission details (in Russian) can be read at
http://www.federalspace.ru/Start1Show.asp?STARTID=574

JimO
www.jamesoberg.com

Nice find.

Far more interesting than the fact the ISS crew get magazines and DVDs
to me was the Soyuz LV upgrade timeline. While the aurora/onega stuff
seems likely to be viewgraph engineering, the Soyuz 2A and 2B and
perhaps the Kourou pad seem to be fairly firm. Anyone know if this is
true, or just more 'if we had the money' dreaming ?

Incidently, the Soyouz 2B gives an extra 1000kg to LEO from Baikonur,
which should be plenty for extra heat sheild that the seemingly
implausible CSI http://www.constellationservices.com/ plan would
require. Hmmm...

It is also interesting to see the same LV gets about 2.5x the payload
to geostationary from Kourou compaired Baikonur. That should provide
an attractive option for medium sized GEO sats.
  #18  
Old August 14th 04, 10:39 PM
Christopher M. Jones
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Posts: n/a
Default

hop wrote:
Incidently, the Soyouz 2B gives an extra 1000kg to LEO from Baikonur,
which should be plenty for extra heat sheild that the seemingly
implausible CSI http://www.constellationservices.com/ plan would
require. Hmmm...


I was under the impression that the Soyuz had lower
performance now than it used to, as the Soviets used
to use Sintin rather than stock Kerosene. The
Russians ran out of money to keep Sintin production
running sometime in the mid '90s.
  #19  
Old August 14th 04, 10:39 PM
Christopher M. Jones
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Posts: n/a
Default

hop wrote:
Incidently, the Soyouz 2B gives an extra 1000kg to LEO from Baikonur,
which should be plenty for extra heat sheild that the seemingly
implausible CSI http://www.constellationservices.com/ plan would
require. Hmmm...


I was under the impression that the Soyuz had lower
performance now than it used to, as the Soviets used
to use Sintin rather than stock Kerosene. The
Russians ran out of money to keep Sintin production
running sometime in the mid '90s.
  #20  
Old August 15th 04, 04:23 AM
Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Joseph Nebus" wrote in message
...
Andrew Gray writes:

Unfortunately I don't find a reference offhand ... but it is one
of the greater space pranks played.


One of the greatest that never quite worked was Apollo 12 where they brought
a timer for the camera.

Idea was to put it on the camera, set it up on Surveyor and both stand in
front of the camera while it snapped a picture.

In retrospect, with so many moon-hoaxers around, it's probably a good thing
they didn't do this.


--
Joseph Nebus
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

----



 




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