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Apollo: One gas environment?



 
 
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  #61  
Old May 4th 04, 04:28 AM
Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)
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"Kevin Willoughby" wrote in message
...

With any kind of instrumentation, you have to ask "how good does it have
to be?" Any bread maker knows that flours are different in several ways,
including water content. Eggs vary in size. Some vinegars are more
acidic than others. Some cayenne peppers are hotter than others. Some
basil is more more intensely flavored than other. If the cups and
spoons are more consistent than the raw ingredients, then they are good
enough.


Ayup. I do tend to use the same batch of measuring cups within a recipe (I
have a set of plastic and a set of metal) just to be consistent, but
ultimtely, it's as much about "this looks right" as anything else.

Oh and you can never have too much garlic.


--
Kevin Willoughby lid

Imagine that, a FROG ON-OFF switch, hardly the work
for test pilots. -- Mike Collins



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  #62  
Old May 4th 04, 04:30 AM
Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)
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"Kevin Willoughby" wrote in message
...
In article , "Greg D. Moore


Well, if you're willing to spend $20 for an evening, there are several
places to park. (Or if you have a girl friend who lives just north of
Harvard Square, you can borrow her space...)


Nah.. much more fun to just drive in circles around the Square.

(I did amazingly once get like the most coveted spot.. just pure luck.)


Northeastern University, just a few blocks south of the Harvard bridge.


Ah. Almot applied.

--
Kevin Willoughby lid

Imagine that, a FROG ON-OFF switch, hardly the work
for test pilots. -- Mike Collins



  #63  
Old May 4th 04, 05:29 AM
Jay Windley
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"Greg D. Moore (Strider)" wrote in message
...
|
| Unfortunately these units never achieved the popularity of the Smoot.

A former colleague of mine, who seemed to spend a lot of time emulating a
projectile, proposed a unit of momentum call the "Daniel".

--
|
The universe is not required to conform | Jay Windley
to the expectations of the ignorant. | webmaster @ clavius.org

  #64  
Old May 4th 04, 07:16 AM
Mary Shafer
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On Mon, 3 May 2004 20:26:23 -0400, Kevin Willoughby
wrote:

A few years ago, the bridge was falling apart and most of it had to be
rebuilt without actually shutting down traffic over the river, so maybe
the MIT engineers knew what they were talking about.


It was re-smooted after the reconstruction.

(fwiw: I attended neither Harvard nor MIT.)


Nor did I; they were men's schools at the time.

Mary

--
Mary Shafer Retired aerospace research engineer

  #65  
Old May 4th 04, 07:16 AM
Mary Shafer
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On Tue, 04 May 2004 03:20:35 GMT, "Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)"
wrote:


"Neil Gerace" wrote in message
. au...

Another benefit of decimal currency over Lsd (money, that is) is that
suddenly three quarters of the time spent in school on maths could be used
for something other than money sums.


That reminds me of a system we all use that's not base 10...

Time.

I mean come on... 24 hour days? 60 minutes to an hour... 60 seconds, but
powers of 10 for subsecond intervals.

Oh and 7 days in week?

Geesh, who thunk those up!


The Babylonians or someone, as I recall.

And you know what, we seem to manage for the most part.


You've got to admit that 60 is evenly divisible by a lot of numbers.

However, when I was doing my biweekly time cards, I got tangled up now
and then between hours:minutes and hours.(minutes/60). It's really
hard to get 4.30 and 3.30 to add up to 8 when you actually mean 4.5
and 3.5, as determined from 7:30 to 12:00 and 12:30 to 4:00.

Mary

--
Mary Shafer Retired aerospace research engineer

  #67  
Old May 4th 04, 07:39 AM
Derek Lyons
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"Ami Silberman" wrote:
An American baker is happy baking cookies in Fahrenheit. A French baker
is happy baking cookies in Celsius. Does it really matter? My argument is
that it does not, and that any measurement system that claims to be based
on "natural" relationships is probably not.


And a British baker is happy baking cookies in "Gas Marks". Are these
actually calibrated, or correspond to anything? It confuses me when I watch
Jamie Oliver on the Food Network.


AIUI, yes, they are calibrated.

However, a real cook or baker depends more on what the food is telling
them than on arbitrary time-and-temperature settings.

D.
--
Touch-twice life. Eat. Drink. Laugh.
  #68  
Old May 4th 04, 07:45 AM
Derek Lyons
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"Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)" wrote:
Actually for baking it's often far worse. I saw a quick test done once. I
think it was 3 different sets of cups and spoons. None matched the
equivalent device in the other set. (i.e. all three teaspoons held different
amounts).


Which isn't a big deal so long as you cleave unto one set forsaking
all others. In baking it's *proportions* that matter far more than
actual weight/volume. (For home and small batches anyhow.)

So, ultimately it's all relative (and this is in fact the way I believe
professional bakers do it all.)


Yes, professional bakers (and serious amateurs) monitor proportions,
but they only measure wet ingredients by volume, dry ingredients are
measured by weight.

D.
--
Touch-twice life. Eat. Drink. Laugh.
  #69  
Old May 4th 04, 07:46 AM
Derek Lyons
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"Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)" wrote:

Oh and you can never have too much garlic.


My wife and I regard garlic as a vegetable, not as a spice or
aromatic.

D.
--
Touch-twice life. Eat. Drink. Laugh.
  #70  
Old May 4th 04, 09:11 AM
Tomas Lundberg
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Jay Windley wrote:

There are many reasons why a system would not be consistent, or would not be
used consistently, or would be confused with informal equivalents.
(Celsius, for example, is not SI -- Kelvin is -- but is commonly used in the
Metric System along with other elements of SI, leading to confusion.)


Celsius is however an "SI derived unit with special name" (see
http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/units.html), which puts it on the
same footing as for instance hertz, volt, and newton, so I would say
that for all practical purposes it's an SI unit (but not an SI *base*
unit). In practice there is never ever any confusion between celsius
and kelvin. (Although I must admit that a couple of times I've had to
explicitly tell second-year undergraduate students in physics to use
kelvin instead of celsius in formulas when they didn't come up with
the correct answer and didn't understand why. But they quickly learned
their lesson.)

A historical sidenote: Anders Celsius, professor in astronomy at Uppsala,
Sweden, originally placed the fixed-points of his thermometer scale the
other way around, with 0 C at the boiling point of water, and 100 C at
the freezing point. Carl von LinnÚ is generally credited for turning
it around to the "modern" way.

I've seen kilograms-force (kgf) gain popularity as a competing unit of
force. In my mind that's just revisiting the fiasco between pounds-mass and
pounds-force in English units. I will happily admit that the SI was meant
from the start to be a clean, consistent, and simple system. I'm sorry to
see it start to get "polluted" like the English system.


I agree that in everyday usage some "polluting" units are still used, but
as Henry noted they are used less and less: in Sweden atmospheric pressure
is now given in hPa instead of mm of Hg, nails and lumber is specified in
metric units instead of inches, as is also bicycle tyres (but I'm not
sure about car tyres), etc. On the other hand the "size" of an bicycle
is specified as the size of the rims -- in inches.

Tomas

--
Tomas Lundberg | It doesn't make any difference how smart you are,
Ericsson AB | you better not ever prostitute physics.
Luleň, SWEDEN | Don Arabian
E-mail: - remove the obvious
 




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