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Are We Alone ?



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 12th 21, 07:22 PM posted to alt.astronomy
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Posts: 33
Default Are We Alone ?

Since the Universe is obviously infinite, dimensionally ( and also in
time ), however small the probability, there are still likely an
infinite number of planets with intelligent life.

BUT, due to the vast interstellar distances, the chance of meaningful
interaction with others is essentially 0 .

No, we've never been visited by aliens, aren't being visited now, and
never will be.
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  #5  
Old May 13th 21, 03:36 PM posted to alt.astronomy
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Default Are We Alone ?


Have you ever been called "A One-Trick Pony"??



Such a very important message, can't be stated too often.
  #9  
Old May 17th 21, 03:27 PM posted to alt.astronomy
R Kym Horsell[_2_]
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Posts: 111
Default Are We Alone ?

In alt.astronomy Michael F. Stemper wrote:
On 15/05/2021 23.55, Bast wrote:
wrote:
Amazing how the whole point of this thread continues to be missed,
that distances are FAR too great for any practical travel between
stars, even in the very unlikely event of traveling near light speed,
or of any communications. All experience so far has confirmed this.



You mean,......SO FAR
It was not that long ago the same thought about being impossible was said
about beng able to travel at speeds of over 30 miles per hour......


Was that said by physicists, or by newspaper writers?


Neither. Google is your friend.

Modern physicists on the other hand are starting to doube that anything
is really impossible. Quantum tunneling e.g. allows particles to
pass through regions where they should not "possibly" be able to pass.

Bur grade school science book writers that claim "nothing can go
faster than light" are in the position of quoting physics that otherwise
allows two points in spacetime to be connected directly and allow
zero transit time. Or allow space to expand at any speed and drag
anything "in" it along for the ride.

But I guess that stuff is written for kids. Like when jr grade school
textbooks say you cain divide a number by a bigger number or
subtract a bigger number from a smaller number.

You're meant to figure out later that that was just a bit of simplifying b/s.

--
[Surprise surprise surprise! The universe started from a dot 13 bn years
ago but has managed to grow to ~100 GLY across in that time -- apparently
4x faster than jr science textbooks say!]

The radius of the observable universe is therefore estimated to be about
46.5 billion light-years and its diameter about 28.5 gigaparsecs (93 billion
light-years, or 8.8?1026 metres or 2.89?1027 feet), which equals 880
yottametres.
Age: 13.799?0.021 billion years
Diameter: 8.8?1026 m or 880 Ym (28.5 Gpc or ...
Density (of total energy): 9.9?10-27 kg/m3 ...
-- wiki

  #10  
Old May 17th 21, 04:09 PM posted to alt.astronomy
R Kym Horsell[_2_]
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Posts: 111
Default Are We Alone ?

In alt.astronomy Bast wrote:
wrote:
Amazing how the whole point of this thread continues to be missed,
that distances are FAR too great for any practical travel between
stars, even in the very unlikely event of traveling near light speed,
or of any communications. All experience so far has confirmed this.

You mean,......SO FAR
It was not that long ago the same thought about being impossible was said
about beng able to travel at speeds of over 30 miles per hour......
Until it happened.
If I have missed the point that some people willl always refuse to believe
that limits are only something thet has not been figured out yet, then you
are right.
Wait until we discover that light actually can travel faster than "C", and
it's medium is actually the "stuff" we now wrongly call "dark matter".

....

Sounds a bit speculative.

We know the speed of light in a vacuum is faster than the speed of
light in a material with a refractive index 1.

But we also know the vacuum is nowhere near empty -- there are virtual
particles, mostly electron/positron paris, jamming around any photon
trying to motor along. If you had a "real" quantum vaccum then you
might find photons moved faster.

Another paper I skimmed recently proposed the speed
of light in certain directions might be different from c because
we live in a simulation that has a discrete grid of space and time,
presumably to save on storage space in the computer system that's running us.
If a photo travels parallel to the grid squares it might travel at
c but if it travelled across the diagonal of the squares it might
be able to travel at e.g. 1.4 c. Maybe hard to measure if this idea
is true but it's the first proposal I've heard of an experiment
that might support whether or not we are simulations.

--
The quantum vacuum as the origin of the speed of light
Marcel Urban, Francois Couchot, Xavier Sarazin, Arache Djannati-Atai
21/2/2013
https://arxiv.org/abs/1302.6165

The quantum vacuum as the origin of the speed of light. We show that the
vacuum permeability and permittivity may originate from the magnetization
and the polarization of continuously appearing and disappearing fermion pairs.
We then show that if we simply model the propagation of the photon in vacuum
as a series of transient captures within these ...
 




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