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Great Temp. Great Heat Man verses Nature But not for Long Spacetimes



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 27th 08, 03:22 PM posted to alt.astronomy
[email protected]
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Default Great Temp. Great Heat Man verses Nature But not for Long Spacetimes

Man's laser hotter than the Sun's surface.for an instant. Sun's great
heat lasts billions of years.Man creates much lower temperature than
nature,but not for long. Black hole much colder than the space its
imerged in can lock this cold in for billions and billions of years
Bert
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  #2  
Old January 27th 08, 07:08 PM posted to alt.astronomy
Jeff☠Relf
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Default If you want cold, you must go to the outer edge of the Milky Way.

Empirically, how cold are “ black holes ” Bert ?
I'm talking measured temperature, not theory.

Anti-Matter induced gamma-rays from Sagittarius A*,
the purported black hole at the center of the Milky Way,
makes the sun look like an ice cube.

If you want cold, you must go to the outer edge of the Milky Way,
where the cold vacuous dark matter is.

  #3  
Old January 27th 08, 09:39 PM posted to alt.astronomy
BradGuth
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Default If you want cold, you must go to the outer edge of the Milky Way.

On Jan 27, 10:08 am, Jeff*Relf wrote:
Empirically, how cold are “ black holes ” Bert ?
I'm talking measured temperature, not theory.

Anti-Matter induced gamma-rays from Sagittarius A*,
the purported black hole at the center of the Milky Way,
makes the sun look like an ice cube.

If you want cold, you must go to the outer edge of the Milky Way,
where the cold vacuous dark matter is.


Now way, as a black hole has got to be at least a million fold colder
than any interstellar void. Is there such a thing as -K? (if not,
perhaps there should be)
. - Brad Guth
  #4  
Old January 28th 08, 02:22 PM posted to alt.astronomy
[email protected]
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Default If you want cold, you must go to the outer edge of the Milky Way.

On Jan 27, 1:08*pm, Jeff*Relf wrote:
Empirically, how cold are “ black holes ” Bert ?
I'm talking measured temperature, not theory.

Anti-Matter induced gamma-rays from Sagittarius A*,
the purported black hole at the center of the Milky Way,
makes the sun look like an ice cube.

If you want cold, you must go to the outer edge of the Milky Way,
where the cold vacuous dark matter is.


Jeff All BH have the same temp about a million times colder than the
ether Only motion is created by the great attraction of its central
core.Nothing is motionless,and that is the reason absolute zero is
impossible. Bert
  #5  
Old January 28th 08, 04:39 PM posted to alt.astronomy
Jeff☠Relf
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Default We know it's hottest at the center of the Milky Way.

Bert, General Relativity models
what would happen if something were metaphysically dense;
but it doesn't not require that something be metaphysically dense.

We know your “ black holes are cold ” idea is wrong, Bert, because,
empirically, we know it's hottest at the center of the Milky Way,
just as it's hottest at the center of the solar system.

  #6  
Old January 29th 08, 04:10 PM posted to alt.astronomy
Hagar[_1_]
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Default If you want cold, you must go to the outer edge of the Milky Way.


"BradGuth" wrote in message
...
On Jan 27, 10:08 am, Jeff?Relf wrote:
Empirically, how cold are " black holes " Bert ?
I'm talking measured temperature, not theory.

Anti-Matter induced gamma-rays from Sagittarius A*,
the purported black hole at the center of the Milky Way,
makes the sun look like an ice cube.

If you want cold, you must go to the outer edge of the Milky Way,
where the cold vacuous dark matter is.


Now way, as a black hole has got to be at least a million fold colder
than any interstellar void. Is there such a thing as -K? (if not,
perhaps there should be)
.. - Brad Guth

So let me get this right, Brad, BHs are far colder than the lowest
temperature in the Universe ?? Oh, I see, that explains the million +
degrees of hot jets of particles ejected for billions of miles along its
rotational axis by matter about to be sucked into the BH.

Black Holes are known for their tremendous gravity. That gravity interprets
into extremely high internal pressures. Any internal pressure creates heat.
So perhaps you could explain to us dummies where the negative (-) absolute
zero temperatures supposedly come from that you claim to exist in a BH.
BTW, the rest of the scientific world seems to believe that the lowest
temperature anywhere in the visible Universe is about 3 degrees above the
absolute, as measured by COBE, with the cute moniker of Cosmic Microwave
Background Radiation..


  #7  
Old January 29th 08, 05:42 PM posted to alt.astronomy
oldcoot
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Default If you want cold, check out a quiescent BH (Was... )

On Jan 29, 7:10*am, "Hagar" wrote:

So let me get this right... BHs are far colder than the lowest
temperature in the Universe ?? *Oh, I see, that explains the million +
degrees of hot jets of particles ejected for billions of miles along its
rotational axis by matter about to be sucked into the BH.

The jets are still `outside` the event horizon, composed of material
from the accretion disc that's been "backfired" along the polar axis
by a little-understood magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) process.

Black Holes are known for their tremendous gravity. *That gravity interprets
into extremely high internal pressures. *Any internal pressure creates heat.
So perhaps you could explain to us dummies where the negative (-) absolute
zero temperatures supposedly come from that you claim to exist in a BH.

Frames of referance again. It's certainly mucho hot inside the BH. But
from here 'outside', the black body temperature of a quiescent (non-
accreting) BH will be very close to absolute zero (discounting any
negligible "Hawking radiation").




  #8  
Old January 29th 08, 06:34 PM posted to alt.astronomy
G=EMC^2 Glazier[_1_]
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Default We know it's hottest at the center of the Milky Way.

Jeff Do not like to be called wrong when all is hypothetical thinking.
Are galaxy is creating fusion(new stars in the arms Center of the
galaxy you have great BH and that creates an accretion disk as stars are
torn apart as the fall into the event horizon. The disk looks like a
question mark,and that is a hot spot Bert

  #9  
Old January 29th 08, 06:34 PM posted to alt.astronomy
Jeff☠Relf
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Posts: 223
Default Old Coot, we don't care what religion you're espousing.

We don't care what religion you're espousing, Old Coot,
Hagar and I are relating ► empirical science.

Although General Relativity can model any density,
it prohibits infinitely dense objects.

Einstein ► Trashed the “ black hole ” concept in no uncertain terms,
because objects falling into a true event horizon
would move at unphysical speeds, faster than the speed of light.

A true event horizon is forever metaphysical;
i.e. it's a pure religion, ► never a science.

Even Stephen Hawking no longer believes in true black holes,
as the path integral of quantum mechanics forbids it.

Although it took Stephen Hawking a long time,
he did come into agreement with Einstein... Why can't you ?

Sagittarius A*, the purported black hole at the center of the Milky Way,
is the hottest part of the galaxy,
like the sun is the hottest part of the solar system.

Sagittarius A* is surrounded by a 10 kilo light year wide
cloud of anti-matter induced gamma rays, as bright as 10 thousand suns:
http://News.Yahoo.COM/s/space/200801...MbuhXz_KUPLBIF

  #10  
Old January 29th 08, 06:57 PM posted to alt.astronomy
Jeff☠Relf
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Posts: 223
Default A true event horizon is forever a religion, never a science.

Einstein proved Black holes can't exist. A lesser mind,
it took Stephen Hawking decades to realize Einstein was right.

General Relativitity forbids infinite density.

You're espousing a religion Bert,
not engagin in “ hypothetical thinking ”.
A true event horizon is forever a religion, never a science.

What are the ► Facts Bert ? What's hotter ?
Sagettarius A* ( the so-called “ frozen star ” ) or the sun ?

 




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