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what a tragedy for you



 
 
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  #11  
Old May 25th 20, 02:47 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Doctor Who[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 59
Default what a tragedy for you

On 5/24/20 8:57 PM, Jeff Findley wrote:
In article , says...

You can only expect a citation to the patent that will be filed some
months in the future, nothing else I think.


Not terribly encouraging given past experience with people claiming to
have invented a reactionless drive.

Here is a NASA paper on the subject of reactionless drives that simply
don't work, at least some of which were patented.

Responding to Mechanical Antigravity
Marc G. Millis - Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio
Nicholas E. Thomas - University of Miami, Miami, Florida
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070004897

I hope that the above will shed some light on wny I'm quite skeptical.

Jeff


you just don't get the point.

there is nothing mechanical, nor moving parts in an electromagnetic
reactionless drive.

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  #12  
Old May 25th 20, 01:07 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Alain Fournier[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 438
Default what a tragedy for you

On May/24/2020 at 21:47, Doctor Who wrote :
On 5/24/20 8:57 PM, Jeff Findley wrote:
In article , says...

You can only expect a citation to the patent that will be filed some
months in the future, nothing else I think.


Not terribly encouraging given past experience with people claiming to
have invented a reactionless drive.

Here is a NASA paper on the subject of reactionless drives that simply
don't work, at least some of which were patented.

Responding to Mechanical Antigravity
Marc G. Millis - Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio
Nicholas E. Thomas - University of Miami, Miami, Florida
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070004897

I hope that the above will shed some light on wny I'm quite skeptical.

Jeff


you just don't get the point.

there is nothing mechanical, nor moving parts in an electromagnetic
reactionless drive.


I believe you that there are no moving parts. On the other hand, if you
look at a SpaceX launch, you really see it moving.


Alain Fournier
  #13  
Old May 25th 20, 01:14 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Doctor Who[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 59
Default what a tragedy for you

On 5/25/20 2:07 PM, Alain Fournier wrote:
On May/24/2020 at 21:47, Doctor Who wrote :
On 5/24/20 8:57 PM, Jeff Findley wrote:
In article , says...

You can only expect a citation to the patent that will be filed some
months in the future, nothing else I think.

Not terribly encouraging given past experience with people claiming to
have invented a reactionless drive.

Here is a NASA paper on the subject of reactionless drives that simply
don't work, at least some of which were patented.

Responding to Mechanical Antigravity
Marc G. Millis - Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio
Nicholas E. Thomas - University of Miami, Miami, Florida
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070004897

I hope that the above will shed some light on wny I'm quite skeptical.

Jeff


you just don't get the point.

there is nothing mechanical, nor moving parts in an electromagnetic
reactionless drive.


I believe you that there are no moving parts. On the other hand, if you
look at a SpaceX launch, you really see it moving.


Alain Fournier



no I see it imploding during tests, and NASA's Loverro going away.

reactionless drive is not antigravity.
  #14  
Old May 25th 20, 02:45 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Jeff Findley[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,186
Default what a tragedy for you

In article , says...

On 5/24/20 8:57 PM, Jeff Findley wrote:
In article ,
says...

You can only expect a citation to the patent that will be filed some
months in the future, nothing else I think.


Not terribly encouraging given past experience with people claiming to
have invented a reactionless drive.

Here is a NASA paper on the subject of reactionless drives that simply
don't work, at least some of which were patented.

Responding to Mechanical Antigravity
Marc G. Millis - Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio
Nicholas E. Thomas - University of Miami, Miami, Florida
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070004897

I hope that the above will shed some light on wny I'm quite skeptical.

Jeff



just useless babblering.


I post an actual NASA paper on the subject of the patent office being
duped on this very subject and you say I'm "babblering"? LOL!

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Or put another way
in English, put up or shut up.

Jeff
--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.
 




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