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Full moon at the South Pole



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 5th 18, 05:57 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Posts: 1,382
Default Full moon at the South Pole


https://www.moongiant.com/phase/today/

https://www.usap.gov/videoclipsandmaps/spwebcam.cfm

What a difference the diminishing light of the moon makes as polar night becomes well established for the next 4 months.

Here is something anyone can work on as the moon orbits the Earth so a unique place to see the phases evolve continuously for periods of the moon's orbit.






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  #2  
Old May 6th 18, 11:04 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Mike Collins[_4_]
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Default Full moon at the South Pole

Gerald Kelleher wrote:

https://www.moongiant.com/phase/today/

https://www.usap.gov/videoclipsandmaps/spwebcam.cfm

What a difference the diminishing light of the moon makes as polar night
becomes well established for the next 4 months.

Here is something anyone can work on as the moon orbits the Earth so a
unique place to see the phases evolve continuously for periods of the moon's orbit.








You can’t see the phases continuously for two reasons. It’s often cloudy at
the South Pole and the moon rises and sets. It will set on the 12th of May
and rise on the 25th. During these times when you can’t see the Moon from
the South Pole you can see the evolving phases of the Moon every day from
your own garden.

  #3  
Old May 7th 18, 08:13 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Posts: 1,382
Default Full moon at the South Pole

On Sunday, May 6, 2018 at 11:04:17 PM UTC+1, Mike Collins wrote:
Gerald Kelleher wrote:



Here is something anyone can work on as the moon orbits the Earth so a
unique place to see the phases evolve continuously for periods of the moon's orbit.


You can’t see the phases continuously for two reasons. It’s often cloudy at
the South Pole and the moon rises and sets. It will set on the 12th of May
and rise on the 25th. During these times when you can’t see the Moon from
the South Pole you can see the evolving phases of the Moon every day from
your own garden.


Won't dignify the 'cloudy' bit but unlike lower habitable latitudes, the moon's orbital motion is constantly in view for periods or days at the South Pole just as I mentioned in my previous post.

https://www.timeanddate.com/moon/antarctica/south-pole






  #4  
Old May 7th 18, 02:39 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Mike Collins[_4_]
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Posts: 2,789
Default Full moon at the South Pole

Gerald Kelleher wrote:
On Sunday, May 6, 2018 at 11:04:17 PM UTC+1, Mike Collins wrote:
Gerald Kelleher wrote:



Here is something anyone can work on as the moon orbits the Earth so a
unique place to see the phases evolve continuously for periods of the moon's orbit.


You can’t see the phases continuously for two reasons. It’s often cloudy at
the South Pole and the moon rises and sets. It will set on the 12th of May
and rise on the 25th. During these times when you can’t see the Moon from
the South Pole you can see the evolving phases of the Moon every day from
your own garden.


Won't dignify the 'cloudy' bit but unlike lower habitable latitudes, the
moon's orbital motion is constantly in view for periods or days at the
South Pole just as I mentioned in my previous post.

https://www.timeanddate.com/moon/antarctica/south-pole

And it’s out of view for days at a time. But you can see the moon phases
almost every day from your garden whereas at the poles it’s below the
horizon for a couple of weeks at a time.


  #5  
Old May 7th 18, 03:28 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Posts: 1,382
Default Full moon at the South Pole

On Monday, May 7, 2018 at 2:39:03 PM UTC+1, Mike Collins wrote:
Gerald Kelleher wrote:
On Sunday, May 6, 2018 at 11:04:17 PM UTC+1, Mike Collins wrote:
Gerald Kelleher wrote:



Here is something anyone can work on as the moon orbits the Earth so a
unique place to see the phases evolve continuously for periods of the moon's orbit.


You can’t see the phases continuously for two reasons. It’s often cloudy at
the South Pole and the moon rises and sets. It will set on the 12th of May
and rise on the 25th. During these times when you can’t see the Moon from
the South Pole you can see the evolving phases of the Moon every day from
your own garden.


Won't dignify the 'cloudy' bit but unlike lower habitable latitudes, the
moon's orbital motion is constantly in view for periods or days at the
South Pole just as I mentioned in my previous post.

https://www.timeanddate.com/moon/antarctica/south-pole

And it’s out of view for days at a time. But you can see the moon phases
almost every day from your garden whereas at the poles it’s below the
horizon for a couple of weeks at a time.


Next time you try to challenge me on a 100% observational certainty then make sure you read what I wrote first before responding. The bigger insight is that the Sun remains constantly in view for half the Earth's orbit from Equinox to Equinox at either poles and out of sight for the other half.

As the Earth travels through space, the entire surface turns parallel to the orbital plane so that from the March Equinox the South Pole has turned over 45 degrees to the circle of illumination so with each passing day, the area where the Sun is constantly out of sight at the South Pole expands until a maximum circumference on the June Solstice (Antarctic circle).

Two distinct rotations corresponding to two distinct day/night cycles for observers to enjoy and where these rotations combine we get the seasons. The South and North poles are great places on Earth to come to know the dynamics behind the seasons but the old saying applies of leading a horse to water.
  #6  
Old May 7th 18, 03:43 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Mike Collins[_4_]
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Posts: 2,789
Default Full moon at the South Pole

Gerald Kelleher wrote:
On Monday, May 7, 2018 at 2:39:03 PM UTC+1, Mike Collins wrote:
Gerald Kelleher wrote:
On Sunday, May 6, 2018 at 11:04:17 PM UTC+1, Mike Collins wrote:
Gerald Kelleher wrote:


Here is something anyone can work on as the moon orbits the Earth so a
unique place to see the phases evolve continuously for periods of the moon's orbit.

You can’t see the phases continuously for two reasons. It’s often cloudy at
the South Pole and the moon rises and sets. It will set on the 12th of May
and rise on the 25th. During these times when you can’t see the Moon from
the South Pole you can see the evolving phases of the Moon every day from
your own garden.

Won't dignify the 'cloudy' bit but unlike lower habitable latitudes, the
moon's orbital motion is constantly in view for periods or days at the
South Pole just as I mentioned in my previous post.

https://www.timeanddate.com/moon/antarctica/south-pole

And it’s out of view for days at a time. But you can see the moon phases
almost every day from your garden whereas at the poles it’s below the
horizon for a couple of weeks at a time.


Next time you try to challenge me on a 100% observational certainty then
make sure you read what I wrote first before responding. The bigger
insight is that the Sun remains constantly in view for half the Earth's
orbit from Equinox to Equinox at either poles and out of sight for the other half.

As the Earth travels through space, the entire surface turns parallel to
the orbital plane so that from the March Equinox the South Pole has
turned over 45 degrees to the circle of illumination so with each passing
day, the area where the Sun is constantly out of sight at the South Pole
expands until a maximum circumference on the June Solstice (Antarctic circle).

Two distinct rotations corresponding to two distinct day/night cycles for
observers to enjoy and where these rotations combine we get the seasons.
The South and North poles are great places on Earth to come to know the
dynamics behind the seasons but the old saying applies of leading a horse to water.









Nothing you just wrote has anything to do with observing the phases of the
moon.
Which can be done more easily from your garden than the South Pole.


  #7  
Old May 7th 18, 07:17 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Posts: 1,382
Default Full moon at the South Pole

On Monday, May 7, 2018 at 3:43:33 PM UTC+1, Mike Collins wrote:

Nothing you just wrote has anything to do with observing the phases of the
moon.
Which can be done more easily from your garden than the South Pole.


In about two weeks the South Pole will exist at roughly this distance from the circle of illumination -

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/...mericas250.jpg

As the moon will be roughly on the opposite side of the planet it will be out of sight to observers at the South pole -

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/...mericas250.jpg

After two decades on this newsgroup I don't mind posting original astronomical material in a forum that is top heavy with empirical theorists as I do it with the same inspirational experience that encompasses all creation from the smallest to the largest. It is a mutual kiss between an individual life and the greater life of the planet and celestial arena and is there for people who are not intellectually self-absorbed.







  #8  
Old May 10th 18, 06:31 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Posts: 1,382
Default Full moon at the South Pole

At least some websites are making an attempt to create animation representing the position of the moon to the Earth and specifically, in this case to the South Pole and why it will be out of sight in a few days for observers at that unique location

https://www.timeanddate.com/astronom.../location.html

Of course the Earth's surface rotation in response to the Earth's orbital motion is the main focus and presently looks like the image in the previous post (2003/05/22) -

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/...mericas250.jpg

 




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