A Space & astronomy forum. SpaceBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » SpaceBanter.com forum » Others » UK Astronomy
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

The second 'Garnet Star' after Mu Cephei must be 119 Tauri!



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old May 1st 04, 10:04 PM
Abdul Ahad
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default The second 'Garnet Star' after Mu Cephei must be 119 Tauri!

119 Tauri is a 4th magnitude star of deep red colour, a few degrees to
the lower right of the Bull's lower horn (which is of course marked by
the the star Zeta Tauri). It caught my eye during a recent, deep sky
binocular sweep of the area. I have since done numerous searches on
Google and it appears that no one has 'actively' acknowledged 119
Tauri's intense red, gem-like colour and, surprisingly, no comparisons
have yet been made with Mu Cephei, the famous 'Garnet Star' named by
William Herschel in the 18th century.

119 Tauri is a type M2Ib supergiant and has a colour index (B-V) of
+2.07. This is just 12% less than the colour index of Mu Cephei,
making both 119 Tauri and Mu Cephei stars amongst the reddest stars in
the sky and virtually of identical brightnesses.

As 119 Tauri has no proper name in any catalogs, I should write to the
International Astronomical Union's star registry asking them to name
it Abdul Ahad's Garnet Star... following William Herschel's lead!
just joking

BTW: What are the rules for naming stars after people's names? I know
there's a lot of scam out there where, for a small fee, people can
*name* stars that have no previous names in any IAU authorised star
catalogs. Are these recognised in Astronomical circles?

Abdul Ahad
Ads
  #2  
Old May 1st 04, 11:28 PM
Jonathan Silverlight
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In message , Abdul Ahad
writes
119 Tauri is a 4th magnitude star of deep red colour, a few degrees to
the lower right of the Bull's lower horn (which is of course marked by
the the star Zeta Tauri). It caught my eye during a recent, deep sky
binocular sweep of the area. I have since done numerous searches on
Google and it appears that no one has 'actively' acknowledged 119
Tauri's intense red, gem-like colour and, surprisingly, no comparisons
have yet been made with Mu Cephei, the famous 'Garnet Star' named by
William Herschel in the 18th century.

119 Tauri is a type M2Ib supergiant and has a colour index (B-V) of
+2.07. This is just 12% less than the colour index of Mu Cephei,
making both 119 Tauri and Mu Cephei stars amongst the reddest stars in
the sky and virtually of identical brightnesses.

As 119 Tauri has no proper name in any catalogs, I should write to the
International Astronomical Union's star registry asking them to name
it Abdul Ahad's Garnet Star... following William Herschel's lead!
just joking

BTW: What are the rules for naming stars after people's names? I know
there's a lot of scam out there where, for a small fee, people can
*name* stars that have no previous names in any IAU authorised star
catalogs. Are these recognised in Astronomical circles?


They aren't recognised in any circles, AFAIK :-) I don't know if the
rules have changed since Barnard's star and Van Maanen's star got their
names, but if enough people refer to Abdul Ahad's star it might catch
on! It's certainly more interesting than 119 Tauri.
--
Save the Hubble Space Telescope!
Remove spam and invalid from address to reply.
  #3  
Old May 3rd 04, 04:46 AM
CLT
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

BTW: What are the rules for naming stars after people's names? I know
there's a lot of scam out there where, for a small fee, people can
*name* stars that have no previous names in any IAU authorised star
catalogs. Are these recognised in Astronomical circles?


Absolutely! Haven't you heard of the SAO star catalog? It stands for "Sold
Astronomical Objects."

These are astronomical objects which have been sold through the
International Star Registry. Since the purchasers have an official
laser-printer certificate, and the names have been published in a book that
is registered with the US Library of Congress, these names are now official,
and must be used by astronomers in the US. Of course, astronomers are
jealous that
they didn't think of it first. Therefore astronomers have resisted using the
names. In a passive-aggressive move, they have refused to use the full
names, and are using only the numbers. The numbers were assigned in the
order of purchase. However congress is now drafting legislation that will
force astronomers to use the full names. This is only right, as these people
paid good money, and have official certificates.

Of course, as an officially published book, the names are also protected by
International Copyright, thereby forcing the rest of the world to at least
use the numbers as well. And, as more copies of the book are registered with
governments around the world, eventually astronomers everywhere will have to
acknowledge the officialness of these names and use the full names and not
just the Sold Astronomical Objects numbers.

("It must be official. I have an official laser-printer certificate!")

;-)

Chuck Taylor
Do you observe the moon?
Try http://groups.yahoo.com/group/lunar-observing/
And the Lunar Picture of the Day http://www.lpod.org/
************************************

Abdul Ahad



  #4  
Old May 4th 04, 12:55 PM
Abdul Ahad
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"CLT" [email protected] wrote in message ...
BTW: What are the rules for naming stars after people's names? I know
there's a lot of scam out there where, for a small fee, people can
*name* stars that have no previous names in any IAU authorised star
catalogs. Are these recognised in Astronomical circles?


Absolutely! Haven't you heard of the SAO star catalog? It stands for "Sold
Astronomical Objects."

These international star *registries* are selling objects from the SAO
catalogue (SAO once stood for "Simthsonian Astrophysical Observatory")
at scores of dollars a piece...and getting mighty wealthy in the
process too. Who wants to trade physical diamonds, emeralds and
saphires in a jewelery shop these days when their 'virtual'
equivalents are scattered right across the night sky in their myriad
of scintillating colours and luminiscent, heavenly sparkle!?


Of course, astronomers are
jealous that they didn't think of it first. Therefore astronomers have
resisted using the names. In a passive-aggressive move, they have refused to use the full names, and are using only the numbers.


I think Astronomers are trying to keep their narrow interests as niche
and as 'exclusive' as possible with a definite sense of professional
pride. Conventionally, naming stars and celestial objects after
specific individuals has always been reserved for those who have made
a noteworthy contribution in the field.

I don't entirely disagree with this principle...keeps the "riff raff"
out! Imagine if Dell Boy (UK Only Fools and Horses) came on the scene
and named some of the sky's brightest stars after his little Peckham
mob and fictitious market trading company of TIT (Trotters Independent
Traders plc) with absolutely no interest or background in Astronomy!!!

On the other hand, I feel there are far too many of *us* genuine, hard
working Astronomical enthusiasts on this news group who, in my view,
are too precious to go unnoticed through life without having a star
named after us!

And on that note, I hereby pronounce that the star 119 Tauri from this
day forth be universally referred to as Abdul Ahad's "Ruby Star":-

http://uk.geocities.com/aa_spaceagen...hads_star.html

Yesterday evening, I had one last look at it through my telescope
before its lost from view in the rapidly engulfing twilight. The
magnified image I saw was absolutely "breathtaking", with the star's
unique, ruby red colour remaining dominant over and above the
secondary colours produced by scintillation. Nothing to beat that
feeling!

eventually astronomers everywhere will have to
acknowledge the officialness of these names and use the full names and not
just the Sold Astronomical Objects numbers.
("It must be official. I have an official laser-printer certificate!")


I have an idea. How about each person on this group (uk.sci.astronomy)
picks a star which they really like and we name it after them?! It
could be fun and like a bit of a quiz. Conditions could be imposed for
keeping the naming convention a little bit challenging... Some sort of
criteria could be:-

1. The star must not already have a proper name (e.g. Sirius, Algenib,
etc) or a name in common use (e.g. Garnet Star, Pistol Star, Ruby Star
(the one I've just named!) etc)

2. You must be able to quote some unique or exceptional attribute
about your star, which no one else has cited before

3. You will have photographed or seen it with your own eye (and be
able to validate your claim!)

4. Only ONE star in the whole sky can be named per person

5. Once you have decided on the unique name for your unique star, you
can't change it.

[......Plus other criteria to be decided by this group.....]

So... Go on Chuck, on the next clear night do your sky research and
name your star! I will then take steps, on your behalf if you wish,
to make a public announcement and communicate your named star out on
to all the other Astronomy news groups on Google to ensure it cacthes
on with the world's online Astronomy communities... Forever!!!

Abdul Ahad

Chuck Taylor
Do you observe the moon?
Try http://groups.yahoo.com/group/lunar-observing/
And the Lunar Picture of the Day http://www.lpod.org/
************************************

Abdul Ahad

  #6  
Old January 30th 18, 01:09 AM posted to uk.sci.astronomy
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default The second 'Garnet Star' after Mu Cephei must be 119 Tauri!

On Sunday, May 2, 2004 at 9:04:16 AM UTC+12, Abdul Ahad wrote:
119 Tauri is a 4th magnitude star of deep red colour, a few degrees to
the lower right of the Bull's lower horn (which is of course marked by
the the star Zeta Tauri). It caught my eye during a recent, deep sky
binocular sweep of the area. I have since done numerous searches on
Google and it appears that no one has 'actively' acknowledged 119
Tauri's intense red, gem-like colour and, surprisingly, no comparisons
have yet been made with Mu Cephei, the famous 'Garnet Star' named by
William Herschel in the 18th century.

119 Tauri is a type M2Ib supergiant and has a colour index (B-V) of
+2.07. This is just 12% less than the colour index of Mu Cephei,
making both 119 Tauri and Mu Cephei stars amongst the reddest stars in
the sky and virtually of identical brightnesses.

As 119 Tauri has no proper name in any catalogs, I should write to the
International Astronomical Union's star registry asking them to name
it Abdul Ahad's Garnet Star... following William Herschel's lead!
just joking

BTW: What are the rules for naming stars after people's names? I know
there's a lot of scam out there where, for a small fee, people can
*name* stars that have no previous names in any IAU authorised star
catalogs. Are these recognised in Astronomical circles?

Abdul Ahad


See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:119_Tauri.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Space Calendar - November 26, 2003 Ron Baalke Astronomy Misc 1 November 28th 03 10:21 AM
Space Calendar - October 24, 2003 Ron Baalke History 0 October 24th 03 04:38 PM
Space Calendar - October 24, 2003 Ron Baalke Astronomy Misc 0 October 24th 03 04:38 PM
Space Calendar - October 24, 2003 Ron Baalke Misc 0 October 24th 03 04:38 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 SpaceBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.