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'Dawn' asteroid probe -- highest power ever?



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 26th 07, 03:42 PM posted to sci.space.policy,alt.astronomy,sci.space.history
Jim Oberg
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Default 'Dawn' asteroid probe -- highest power ever?

The 'Dawn' asteroid mission (June launch) has a 10 kilowatt electrical power
system --
is that the highest power level ever for an interplanetary probe?

Cassini: 750 watts
Galileo: 500 watts
Deep Space 1: 2.4 kilowatts


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  #2  
Old February 26th 07, 06:00 PM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Brad Guth[_2_]
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Posts: 3,941
Default 'Dawn' asteroid probe -- highest power ever?

"Jim Oberg" wrote in message


The 'Dawn' asteroid mission (June launch) has a 10 kilowatt electrical power
system --
is that the highest power level ever for an interplanetary probe?

Cassini: 750 watts
Galileo: 500 watts
Deep Space 1: 2.4 kilowatts


And exactly how much birth to grave (including yourself) is that mission
costing us?
-
Brad Guth




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  #3  
Old February 26th 07, 09:44 PM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Bill Bonde
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Posts: 88
Default 'Dawn' asteroid probe -- highest power ever?



Brad Guth wrote:

"Jim Oberg" wrote in message


The 'Dawn' asteroid mission (June launch) has a 10 kilowatt electrical power
system --
is that the highest power level ever for an interplanetary probe?

Cassini: 750 watts
Galileo: 500 watts
Deep Space 1: 2.4 kilowatts


And exactly how much birth to grave (including yourself) is that mission
costing us?

I'd chip in a tener to send you to Venus.

--
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Even though ice gone and no seals
Polar bears can't find their meals
Grow as thin as Ally McBeals
  #4  
Old February 26th 07, 09:53 PM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Brad Guth[_2_]
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Posts: 3,941
Default 'Dawn' asteroid probe -- highest power ever?

"Bill Bonde" wrote in message


I'd chip in a tener to send you to Venus.


At least upon Venus there's unlimited renewable energy to burn (sort of
speak), as well as obviously loads of easily obtained elements.

In other words, your 'Dawn' is so freaking bad off spendy that it's
likely costing us at least ten fold whatever your LLPOF NASA is
suggesting.
-
Brad Guth






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  #5  
Old February 26th 07, 09:59 PM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
kT
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Default 'Dawn' asteroid probe -- highest power ever?

Bill Bonde wrote:

Brad Guth wrote:
"Jim Oberg" wrote in message


The 'Dawn' asteroid mission (June launch) has a 10 kilowatt electrical power
system --
is that the highest power level ever for an interplanetary probe?

Cassini: 750 watts
Galileo: 500 watts
Deep Space 1: 2.4 kilowatts

And exactly how much birth to grave (including yourself) is that mission
costing us?

I'd chip in a tener to send you to Venus.


Oh look, it's some conservative humor. What did you guys do, hire some
liberal comedy consultants? I think the baseline mission is under $500
million, but the extended mission could get costly if these things are
as robust as the Mars Rovers. And they should be. I just read they made
a fundamental efficiency improvement to the Xenon ion thruster design,
variable thrust or some such thing. We need more of these things, not
only do we need to identify everything down to the 100 meter level or
so, we've got hundreds of larger ones to visit. What we really need to
do is fast track a Ceres Reconnaissance Orbiter as a follow up to this
mission, and maybe try to get to Pallas too. Some amazing things are out
there just waiting to be found. It's a nearby fifth planet that we know
very little about.

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  #6  
Old February 27th 07, 01:49 AM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Jonathan
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Posts: 428
Default 'Dawn' asteroid probe -- highest power ever?


"Brad Guth" wrote in message
news:[email protected] .mailgate.org...
"Bill Bonde" wrote in message


I'd chip in a tener to send you to Venus.


At least upon Venus there's unlimited renewable energy to burn (sort of
speak), as well as obviously loads of easily obtained elements.

In other words, your 'Dawn' is so freaking bad off spendy that it's
likely costing us at least ten fold whatever your LLPOF NASA is
suggesting.



But..but...but asteroids are important! Just think..all these
nea's and their metals and minerals just sitting there for
the taking. We could build all kinds of colonies from
them. And just think, all those comets and their water too.
Once we get our hands on asteroids and comets, we'll have
everything ...everything we have right here on earth.

And we'll have all that stuff way the hell out there somewhere.

Planting our seeds baby. I mean if you can't make plans for
two hundred years from now, why plan for the future at all?

Really, who cares what we might accomplish in the
next twenty or forty years, when we could spend all our
resources, and all our time, laying the groundwork
for the twenty third century....instead?

I think they call it being visionary, or something, or maybe
lunacy, no no wait, it's called the big lie.

They paint a pretty picture for us rubes to gawk at.
And while we're enjoying their show-and-tell
they pic our pockets to line their own.
And they laugh ..at us..all the way to the bank.

But we still have the dreams they gave us.

Colonies and spaceships and all that making the
solar system look like LA during rush hour.

ya



Brad Guth






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  #7  
Old February 27th 07, 02:16 AM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Eric Chomko
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Posts: 2,630
Default 'Dawn' asteroid probe -- highest power ever?


kT wrote:
Bill Bonde wrote:

Brad Guth wrote:
"Jim Oberg" wrote in message


The 'Dawn' asteroid mission (June launch) has a 10 kilowatt electrical power
system --
is that the highest power level ever for an interplanetary probe?

Cassini: 750 watts
Galileo: 500 watts
Deep Space 1: 2.4 kilowatts
And exactly how much birth to grave (including yourself) is that mission
costing us?

I'd chip in a tener to send you to Venus.


Oh look, it's some conservative humor. What did you guys do, hire some
liberal comedy consultants? I think the baseline mission is under $500
million, but the extended mission could get costly if these things are
as robust as the Mars Rovers. And they should be. I just read they made
a fundamental efficiency improvement to the Xenon ion thruster design,
variable thrust or some such thing. We need more of these things, not
only do we need to identify everything down to the 100 meter level or
so, we've got hundreds of larger ones to visit. What we really need to
do is fast track a Ceres Reconnaissance Orbiter as a follow up to this
mission, and maybe try to get to Pallas too. Some amazing things are out
there just waiting to be found. It's a nearby fifth planet that we know
very little about.


"Conservative humor" is an oxymoron.


--
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http://orbit.medphys.ucl.ac.uk/orbit.html


  #8  
Old February 27th 07, 05:54 PM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Brad Guth[_2_]
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Posts: 3,941
Default 'Dawn' asteroid probe -- highest power ever?

"Jonathan" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

But..but...but asteroids are important! Just think..all these
nea's and their metals and minerals just sitting there for
the taking. We could build all kinds of colonies from
them. And just think, all those comets and their water too.
Once we get our hands on asteroids and comets, we'll have
everything ...everything we have right here on earth.


OK boss, if you say so. In the silly mean time we have our very own
NEO/NEA as our extremely nearby and horrifically massive moon that's so
physically dark and otherwise downright nasty to deal with, and
otherwise at merely 100 fold that distance we've got access to absolute
butt-loads of other renewable energy, hosting such easy access to all
the raw elements and spare renewable energy of whatever Venus has to
offer, all at the disposal of most any village idiot moron that's worth
half their salt.


Really, who cares what we might accomplish in the
next twenty or forty years, when we could spend all our
resources, and all our time, laying the groundwork
for the twenty third century....instead?


Now you're talking exactly like a true Old Testament thumping kind of
fornacating Republican, or otherwise that of a corrupt Democrat that
literally has the hearts and minds of most every soul on Earth stuffed
between their infomercial spewing and global polluting butt-cheeks.


I think they call it being visionary, or something, or maybe
lunacy, no no wait, it's called the big lie.

They paint a pretty picture for us rubes to gawk at.
And while we're enjoying their show-and-tell
they pic our pockets to line their own.
And they laugh ..at us..all the way to the bank.


That's actually all the way to their offshore tax avoidance banks.


But we still have the dreams they gave us.

Colonies and spaceships and all that making the
solar system look like LA during rush hour.


When in LLPOF land (similar to what the Third Reich had within their
mindset), you obviously must do whatever it takes for keeping the rest
of us village idiot minions as happy campers. Isn't that exactly what
our puppet governments and of their faith based puppeteers do best?
-
Brad Guth


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  #9  
Old February 27th 07, 06:03 PM posted to sci.space.history,sci.space.policy
Brad Guth[_2_]
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Posts: 3,941
Default 'Dawn' asteroid probe -- highest power ever?

"kT" wrote in message


Oh look, it's some conservative humor. What did you guys do, hire some
liberal comedy consultants? I think the baseline mission is under $500
million, but the extended mission could get costly if these things are
as robust as the Mars Rovers. And they should be. I just read they made
a fundamental efficiency improvement to the Xenon ion thruster design,
variable thrust or some such thing. We need more of these things, not
only do we need to identify everything down to the 100 meter level or
so, we've got hundreds of larger ones to visit. What we really need to
do is fast track a Ceres Reconnaissance Orbiter as a follow up to this
mission, and maybe try to get to Pallas too. Some amazing things are out
there just waiting to be found. It's a nearby fifth planet that we know
very little about.


And that effort has put how much food or other life essentials on behalf
of the table for sharing with the lower 99.9% of humanity, that
obviously can't afford to sustain their current level of surviving as
is?

So, you'd gladly spend yet another trillion hard earned bucks or euros
if you could, no matters what else has to die or get polluted past the
point of no return. Way to go kT (aka Hitler).
-
Brad Guth


--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
  #10  
Old February 28th 07, 12:32 AM posted to sci.space.policy,alt.astronomy,sci.space.history
Alex Terrell
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Posts: 492
Default 'Dawn' asteroid probe -- highest power ever?

On 26 Feb, 15:42, "Jim Oberg" wrote:
The 'Dawn' asteroid mission (June launch) has a 10 kilowatt electrical power
system --
is that the highest power level ever for an interplanetary probe?

Cassini: 750 watts
Galileo: 500 watts
Deep Space 1: 2.4 kilowatts


SMART-1 had 2KW. (Is that interplanetary?)

10KW is a lot for a space probe.

 




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