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  #1  
Old November 20th 05, 11:01 PM posted to sci.space.science
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Default Comets

If comets are made from mostly water-ice, some dirt and organic matter they
had to come from a former water planet that blew up somewhere in the
universe.
The planet apparently had water and life before it's demise. This seems to
be the natural way the universe seeds it's livable planets and spreads it's
life. There must be lots of Ort clouds and Keifer belts in other solar
systems and other galaxies.

--
America's problem? The plates are too big!
Throw out your dinner plates and get smaller ones!
More is NOT better. 20oz soda is TOO big, get an 8 ounce glasses, bottles
and cans .
The fat must come off or you die a sickly decrepit death.


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  #2  
Old November 22nd 05, 11:03 PM posted to sci.space.science
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Default Comets

Nog wrote:
If comets are made from mostly water-ice, some dirt and organic
matter they had to come from a former water planet that blew up
somewhere in the universe.


Why? What says that organic matter can only be produced on a planet?
(IIRC, while "life" implies organic matter, organic matter does not
have to have come from "life" yes?)

rick jones
--
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There's only yourself. The belief is in your own precision. - Jobert
these opinions are mine, all mine; HP might not want them anyway...
feel free to post, OR email to rick.jones2 in hp.com but NOT BOTH...
  #3  
Old November 23rd 05, 04:09 AM posted to sci.space.science
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Default Comets

In article [email protected], "Nog"
wrote:

If comets are made from mostly water-ice, some dirt and organic matter they
had to come from a former water planet that blew up somewhere in the
universe.


Er... why? Where do you imagine this water planet came from? Why do
you imagine comets couldn't form in the same way? Finally, what could
possibly "blow up" a water planet and leave fragments of it whizzing
around our solar system?

,------------------------------------------------------------------.
| Joseph J. Strout Check out the Mac Web Directory: |
| http://www.macwebdir.com |
`------------------------------------------------------------------'
  #4  
Old November 23rd 05, 05:50 AM posted to sci.space.science
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Default Comets


Nog wrote:
If comets are made from mostly water-ice, some dirt and organic matter they
had to come from a former water planet that blew up somewhere in the
universe.


Er, no. Stars are made of hydrogen, so when they go super nova, they
scatter a lot of hydrogen. Further, larger stars makes a lot of oxygen
(see C-N-O cycle fusion) so when bigger stars go super nova, they
scatter a lot of water. That's where the water in comets (and on Earth)
comes from: stellar nucleosynthesis. The same also applies to carbon
and nitrogen - they're generated in stars.

Comets - with water, organics, and rock dust - needn't come from
planets at all.

Mike Miller

  #5  
Old November 23rd 05, 05:25 PM posted to sci.space.science
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Default Comets

Nog wrote:
If comets are made from mostly water-ice, ... they
had to come from a former water planet


Then where did the first water planet come from?

The fact is, comets do not come from former water planets. They come
from interstellar gas, which comes from stars. Stars like our own sun
will eventually create all kinds of atoms, and eventually spread many
of those atoms out into the cosmos. Some of those atoms may find their
way into new stars, new planets, and new comets.

A small number of the atoms in our Earth will also make their way into
the greater cosmos (Earth loses tons of atmosphere every day) - but
what Earth contributes back is a tiny tiny percentage of what the sun
creates.

So, the Oxygen atoms in a comet definitely come from a star. They may
have even passed through a second star. They were never part of a
planet. Sorry.

  #6  
Old November 23rd 05, 06:00 PM posted to sci.space.science
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Default Comets

In article [email protected], Nog wrote:
If comets are made from mostly water-ice, some dirt and organic matter they
had to come from a former water planet that blew up somewhere in the
universe.


Not necessarily. In the dust cloud around a forming star,
there would be lots of water molecules, ammonia molecules,
"dirt" molecules, and a fair number of organic molecules.
Cold temperatures would cause things to be mostly in the
form of ice, but even then, there would be enough energy
for higher organic molecules than methane and benzene to
form, given enough time.

The planet apparently had water and life before it's demise. This seems to
be the natural way the universe seeds it's livable planets and spreads it's
life. There must be lots of Ort clouds and Keifer belts in other solar
systems and other galaxies.


As I said before, this does not have to come from the
decomposition of a planet. There probably are a lot of
Oort clouds and Kuiper belts, especially about stars
which are not part of a multiple system.

--
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are those of the Statistics Department or of Purdue University.
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Phone: (765)494-6054 FAX: (765)494-0558
  #7  
Old November 24th 05, 03:37 PM posted to sci.space.science
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Default Comets



--
America's problem? The plates are too big!
Throw out your dinner plates and get smaller ones!
More is NOT better. 20oz soda is TOO big, get an 8 ounce glasses, bottles
and cans .
The fat must come off or you die a sickly decrepit death.


"Joe Strout" wrote in message
...
In article [email protected], "Nog"
wrote:

If comets are made from mostly water-ice, some dirt and organic matter
they
had to come from a former water planet that blew up somewhere in the
universe.


Er... why? Where do you imagine this water planet came from? Why do
you imagine comets couldn't form in the same way? Finally, what could
possibly "blow up" a water planet and leave fragments of it whizzing
around our solar system?

,------------------------------------------------------------------.
| Joseph J. Strout Check out the Mac Web Directory: |
| http://www.macwebdir.com |
`------------------------------------------------------------------'


Water planets come from solar systems. An exploding star would shatter many
planets in it's system. Organics don't form in a vacuum. You need a planet
with atmosphere.

  #8  
Old November 24th 05, 03:41 PM posted to sci.space.science
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Default Comets




wrote in message
oups.com...

Nog wrote:
If comets are made from mostly water-ice, some dirt and organic matter
they
had to come from a former water planet that blew up somewhere in the
universe.


Er, no. Stars are made of hydrogen, so when they go super nova, they
scatter a lot of hydrogen. Further, larger stars makes a lot of oxygen
(see C-N-O cycle fusion) so when bigger stars go super nova, they
scatter a lot of water. That's where the water in comets (and on Earth)
comes from: stellar nucleosynthesis. The same also applies to carbon
and nitrogen - they're generated in stars.

Comets - with water, organics, and rock dust - needn't come from
planets at all.

Mike Miller


They must come from planets. Organics don't form in total vacuums. You need
a planet with an atmosphere to develop life. Then an exploding star can
shatter all the inner planets where water planets form.
Scientists hate new theories, don't they.

  #9  
Old December 2nd 05, 04:00 AM posted to sci.space.science
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Default Comets


Nog wrote:

Water planets come from solar systems. An exploding star would shatter many
planets in it's system.


When a star goes "bang," a lot of complicated nuclear reactions happen
in its core. These nuclear reactions produce things like carbon,
oxygen, nitrogen, which react with existing elements like hydrogen. No
planets need be involved.

If you want to dispute this, take a moment to google "stellar
nucleosynthesis" before posting anything.

Organics don't form in a vacuum.


Absolutely false. Carbon, hydrogen, and other elements don't give a wet
fart about where they are when they encounter each other. Stars produce
those elements in great quantities. No planets are needed.

Mike Miller

 




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