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Shuttle Press Release Drinking Game.



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 20th 11, 10:56 PM posted to sci.space.history
Fevric J. Glandules
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Posts: 181
Default Shuttle Press Release Drinking Game.

Rules: one shot of spirits for every use of the word "final"
in a NASA press release regarding Shuttle.

I'll have an awful hangover next week.
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  #2  
Old July 21st 11, 06:57 PM posted to sci.space.history
Stuf4
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 554
Default Shuttle Press Release Drinking Game.

From Fevric J. Glandules:
Rules: one shot of spirits for every use of the word "final"
in a NASA press release regarding Shuttle.

I'll have an awful hangover next week.


To really get blotto, it would have been one shot for every "God Bless
America" during this final flight. Heh. I was disappointed that NASA
did not have a more inclusive attitude about the broader scope that
thirty years of shuttle spaceflights had over the entire human race
(let alone the direct contributions from outside the country that
brought success to the shuttle program from things like the Canadarm
to international crew members). When Fergie and the others kept
focusing on America with their verbal tributes, I couldn't help but
think of that Chris Rock movie Head of State where he repeated the
campaign catchphrase, "God bless America, and no one else".

Sure, America is properly credited for the vast majority of
conceiving, designing, paying for, building and executing the Space
Shuttle program. This was also true of Apollo. Now imagine if, back
in 1969, Neil Armstrong had stepped off the LM, put that first
bootprint into lunar soil and said:
"That's one small step for a man, One giant leap for Americans."

I for one am certainly glad that Neil gave recognition to the broader
nature of what he was accomplishing. And this morning's landing was a
huge accomplishment in its own way. I just wish that more recognition
had been given to what shuttle has meant to people across the entire
planet over these past 30 years. When I wonder in amazement at Hubble
photos, I don't think to myself "It is excellent for America to have
produced this image". My awe is in the depth of how such images help
to shift the consciousness of all of humanity.

The Space Shuttle has been a blessing to the Whole Earth.

~ CT
  #3  
Old July 21st 11, 11:22 PM posted to sci.space.history
Rick Jones
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Posts: 685
Default Shuttle Press Release Drinking Game.

Fevric J. Glandules wrote:
And if the USA *is* slightly introspective - here's a question.
(Which I CBA to google the answer for). From the borders of the
continental US, how far is it to the next-but-one neighbouring
*major* country?


That depends on one's definition of major doesn't it? For example,
going South past Mexico, would you consider Columbia or Venezuela
major, or would that have to be Brasil? Right there I've already
assumed you would not consider anything from Panama on North to Mexico
to be "major" though at times Panama or Nicaragua have had a "major"
mind share.

rick jones
--
the road to hell is paved with business decisions...
these opinions are mine, all mine; HP might not want them anyway...
feel free to post, OR email to rick.jones2 in hp.com but NOT BOTH...
  #4  
Old July 22nd 11, 12:02 AM posted to sci.space.history
Fevric J. Glandules
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 181
Default Shuttle Press Release Drinking Game.

Stuf4 wrote:

From Fevric J. Glandules:
Rules: one shot of spirits for every use of the word "final"
in a NASA press release regarding Shuttle.

I'll have an awful hangover next week.


To really get blotto, it would have been one shot for every "God Bless
America" during this final flight. Heh. I was disappointed that NASA
did not have a more inclusive attitude about the broader scope that
thirty years of shuttle spaceflights had over the entire human race


snip good points

Indeed. It is perhaps worth adding that a great many naturalised
US citizens, as well as foreign 'guests', have been aboard. In
the UK's case, I believe that one or two of them have had quite a
distinguished flying career.

And if the USA *is* slightly introspective - here's a question.
(Which I CBA to google the answer for). From the borders of
the continental US, how far is it to the next-but-one neighbouring
*major* country?



  #5  
Old July 22nd 11, 12:32 AM posted to sci.space.history
Rick Jones
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 685
Default Shuttle Press Release Drinking Game.

Fevric J. Glandules wrote:
Rick Jones wrote:


Fevric J. Glandules wrote:
And if the USA *is* slightly introspective - here's a question.
(Which I CBA to google the answer for). From the borders of the
continental US, how far is it to the next-but-one neighbouring
*major* country?


That depends on one's definition of major doesn't it? For example,
going South past Mexico, would you consider Columbia or Venezuela
major, or would that have to be Brasil? Right there I've already
assumed you would not consider anything from Panama on North to Mexico
to be "major" though at times Panama or Nicaragua have had a "major"
mind share.


I deliberately left that open - but I would think that most people
would not consider e.g. the Bahamas to be 'major'.


Was my ass-u-me-ption that "next-but-one" meant "not the immediate
neighbor" but a country beyond that? IE that you were not looking for
Russia, Canada or Mexico or any country like that?

rick jones
--
oxymoron n, Hummer H2 with California Save Our Coasts and Oceans plates
these opinions are mine, all mine; HP might not want them anyway...
feel free to post, OR email to rick.jones2 in hp.com but NOT BOTH...
  #6  
Old July 22nd 11, 12:41 AM posted to sci.space.history
Stuf4
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 554
Default Shuttle Press Release Drinking Game.

From Rick Jones :
Fevric J. Glandules wrote:

And if the USA *is* slightly introspective - here's a question.
(Which I CBA to google the answer for). *From the borders of the
continental US, how far is it to the next-but-one neighbouring
*major* country?


That depends on one's definition of major doesn't it? For example,
going South past Mexico, would you consider Columbia or Venezuela
major, or would that have to be Brasil? *Right there I've already
assumed you would not consider anything from Panama on North to Mexico
to be "major" though at times Panama or Nicaragua have had a "major"
mind share.


Lessee... Alaska, last I checked, was still part of the North
American continent, and part of the US. Russia counts as major. The
Bering Strait is 50 something miles wide. And there are those islands
in the middle, the Diomedes. Therefore...

2.4 miles apart. Final answer.

Heh. And I've got Sarah to back me up on this. She can see those
islands from Wasilla!

~ CT
  #7  
Old July 22nd 11, 01:01 AM posted to sci.space.history
Fevric J. Glandules
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 181
Default Shuttle Press Release Drinking Game.

Rick Jones wrote:

Fevric J. Glandules wrote:
And if the USA *is* slightly introspective - here's a question.
(Which I CBA to google the answer for). From the borders of the
continental US, how far is it to the next-but-one neighbouring
*major* country?


That depends on one's definition of major doesn't it? For example,
going South past Mexico, would you consider Columbia or Venezuela
major, or would that have to be Brasil? Right there I've already
assumed you would not consider anything from Panama on North to Mexico
to be "major" though at times Panama or Nicaragua have had a "major"
mind share.


I deliberately left that open - but I would think that most people
would not consider e.g. the Bahamas to be 'major'.
  #8  
Old July 22nd 11, 03:03 AM posted to sci.space.history
rwalker
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 80
Default Shuttle Press Release Drinking Game.

On Fri, 22 Jul 2011 00:01:13 +0000 (UTC), "Fevric J. Glandules"
wrote:

Rick Jones wrote:

Fevric J. Glandules wrote:
And if the USA *is* slightly introspective - here's a question.
(Which I CBA to google the answer for). From the borders of the
continental US, how far is it to the next-but-one neighbouring
*major* country?


That depends on one's definition of major doesn't it? For example,
going South past Mexico, would you consider Columbia or Venezuela
major, or would that have to be Brasil? Right there I've already
assumed you would not consider anything from Panama on North to Mexico
to be "major" though at times Panama or Nicaragua have had a "major"
mind share.


I deliberately left that open - but I would think that most people
would not consider e.g. the Bahamas to be 'major'.


I'd have to look at a globe. But if we restrict it to, say, permanent
members of the UN security council, I wonder if it would be closer
over the North pole from the US-Canadian border to Russia than it
would be across the Atlantic to Europe?
  #9  
Old July 22nd 11, 06:56 PM posted to sci.space.history
Paul Madarasz[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default Shuttle Press Release Drinking Game.

On Thu, 21 Jul 2011 23:02:54 +0000 (UTC), "Fevric J. Glandules"
wrote, perhaps among other things:

Stuf4 wrote:

From Fevric J. Glandules:
Rules: one shot of spirits for every use of the word "final"
in a NASA press release regarding Shuttle.

I'll have an awful hangover next week.


To really get blotto, it would have been one shot for every "God Bless
America" during this final flight. Heh. I was disappointed that NASA
did not have a more inclusive attitude about the broader scope that
thirty years of shuttle spaceflights had over the entire human race


snip good points

Indeed. It is perhaps worth adding that a great many naturalised
US citizens, as well as foreign 'guests', have been aboard. In
the UK's case, I believe that one or two of them have had quite a
distinguished flying career.

And if the USA *is* slightly introspective - here's a question.
(Which I CBA to google the answer for). From the borders of
the continental US, how far is it to the next-but-one neighbouring
*major* country?



In 1,000 years, only history geeks will remember "The United States of
America." I imagine more than that will remember that humankind left
the Earth in the 20th century.
--
"Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell."
-- Ed Abbey
  #10  
Old July 22nd 11, 08:01 PM posted to sci.space.history
Chris Jones
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 120
Default Shuttle Press Release Drinking Game.

Stuf4 writes:

From Fevric J. Glandules:
Rules: one shot of spirits for every use of the word "final"
in a NASA press release regarding Shuttle.

I'll have an awful hangover next week.


To really get blotto, it would have been one shot for every "God Bless
America" during this final flight.


If I needed to get drunk fast, I'd drink on every "historic" out of NASA
PAO.
 




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