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Falcon Sir Lauch-A-Lot?



 
 
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  #41  
Old March 24th 07, 05:53 AM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Damon Hill[_4_]
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Default Falcon Sir Lauch-A-Lot?

"John Halpenny" wrote in
oups.com:


And, if you argue that it takes vast amounts of money to succeed, then
Delta IV should be 10 times more reliable than the Falcon .


That appears to be true, based on the current record.

--Damon

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  #42  
Old March 24th 07, 02:46 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Brian Thorn
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Default Falcon Sir Lauch-A-Lot?

On 23 Mar 2007 22:50:32 -0700, "John Halpenny"
wrote:

And, if you argue that it takes vast amounts of money to succeed, then
Delta IV should be 10 times more reliable than the Falcon .


No one is arguing that so far as I can see.

Brian
  #43  
Old March 25th 07, 05:16 AM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Henry Spencer
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Default Falcon Sir Lauch-A-Lot?

In article ,
richard schumacher wrote:
Did anyone else get creeped out by the sight of the second stage nozzle
glowing orange hot? Yeesh! I hope they remembered that it gets less
cooling in vacuum (that is, in use) than in air (during tests).


Radiation-cooled nozzles often glow quite impressively. The first-stage
nozzles on the old Arianes glowed from takeoff on.
--
spsystems.net is temporarily off the air; | Henry Spencer
mail to henry at zoo.utoronto.ca instead. |
  #44  
Old March 26th 07, 12:08 AM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Henry Spencer
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Default Falcon Sir Lauch-A-Lot?

In article .com,
Alex Terrell wrote:
Just woke up - read all this and can't decide whether the Falcon 1
flight was a success or whether it was a failure with a positive spin.


Unquestionably a failure -- the customer paid for it to place a satellite
in orbit, and it did not achieve that -- although an informative and
useful failure that came very close to success.

If it had been a *demonstration* launch, without a customer payload, then
you could argue that successfully checking out most of the hardware made
it a partial success. But when there's a paying payload aboard and the
flight plan says "deliver to orbit", it doesn't qualify as any kind of
success unless it makes orbit; making an undesirably low orbit could be a
partial success, but not making orbit at all is unambiguously a failure.

What's a roll excitation, and why doesn't the flight control software
compensate for this?


A roll excitation is a loss of control as reported by a good spokesman. :-)
As for why the flight control software didn't cope, well, it should have.
--
spsystems.net is temporarily off the air; | Henry Spencer
mail to henry at zoo.utoronto.ca instead. |
  #45  
Old March 26th 07, 12:12 AM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Henry Spencer
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Default Falcon Sir Lauch-A-Lot?

In article ,
Rand Simberg wrote:
Unless folks are practicing double standards (say it ain't so!) then
Falcon 1 F2 was a failure.


It depends on what the goal of the flight was. If it was a flight
test, I'd say that it was a partial success, and the glass is more
than half full.


Flight tests don't have paying payloads aboard. It was a failure.

A very informative failure which showed that nothing is too badly wrong
with the vehicle, yes. But the customer paid for orbit and didn't get it.
--
spsystems.net is temporarily off the air; | Henry Spencer
mail to henry at zoo.utoronto.ca instead. |
  #48  
Old March 26th 07, 02:14 AM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Charles Buckley
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Default Falcon Sir Lauch-A-Lot?

Henry Spencer wrote:
In article ,
Rand Simberg wrote:
Unless folks are practicing double standards (say it ain't so!) then
Falcon 1 F2 was a failure.

It depends on what the goal of the flight was. If it was a flight
test, I'd say that it was a partial success, and the glass is more
than half full.


Flight tests don't have paying payloads aboard. It was a failure.

A very informative failure which showed that nothing is too badly wrong
with the vehicle, yes. But the customer paid for orbit and didn't get it.



Doesn't that just make it a non-validation flight?
  #49  
Old March 26th 07, 04:14 AM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Pat Flannery
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Default Falcon Sir Lauch-A-Lot?



Henry Spencer wrote:
Radiation-cooled nozzles often glow quite impressively. The first-stage
nozzles on the old Arianes glowed from takeoff on.


They had a beautiful in-flight photo of that taken from one of the
boosters in AW&ST back when Ariane was new.

Pat
 




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