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The Mosquito as space traveller



 
 
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  #21  
Old February 20th 09, 01:42 PM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
Jan Panteltje
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Posts: 453
Default The Mosquito as space traveller

On a sunny day (Fri, 20 Feb 2009 03:32:48 -0800 (PST)) it happened Ian Parker
wrote in
:

Maybe the old earth was much smaller, with
hardly any water, and some big comet hit it,
driving the continents apart, creating oceans,
increasing gravity, that killing all the huge
animals.


If the Earth was smaller gravity would be HIGHER


No, no, smaller = less mass = less gravity.
If you were thinking the same mass, compressed in a smaller volume,
then at the surface you would be heavier.

The idea I was suggesting, is that if some huge comet did hit the earth,
it would get into the core, and increase the mass, causing volcanism all over the place,
and the swelling would push the continents, the solid surface layer fragments, apart.

The resulting increase in gravity due to increased mass, would kill only the big heavy lifeforms.
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  #22  
Old February 20th 09, 02:15 PM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
aleonis
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Posts: 3
Default The Mosquito as space traveller

On Feb 19, 11:32*am, Jan Panteltje wrote:
Mosquito survives 18 month in outerspaceon the ISS outside hull:


.... bull****
  #23  
Old February 20th 09, 06:39 PM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
Ian Parker
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Posts: 2,554
Default The Mosquito as space traveller

On 20 Feb, 13:42, Jan Panteltje wrote:
On a sunny day (Fri, 20 Feb 2009 03:32:48 -0800 (PST)) it happened Ian Parker
wrote in
:

Maybe the old earth was much smaller, with
hardly any water, and some big comet hit it,
driving the continents apart, creating oceans,
increasing gravity, that killing all the huge
animals.


If the Earth was smaller gravity would be HIGHER


No, no, smaller = less mass = less gravity.
If you were thinking the same mass, compressed in a smaller volume,
then at the surface you would be heavier.

The idea I was suggesting, is that if some huge comet did hit the earth,
it would get into the core, and increase the mass, causing volcanism all over the place,
and the swelling would push the continents, the solid surface layer fragments, apart.

The resulting increase in gravity due to increased mass, would kill only the big heavy lifeforms.


The Earth was hit by another body in the Hadeam period. The Hadean is
about 4 billion BP to 4.5 billion BP. There has been no catastophe of
similar magnitude since the Mezozoic which after all was only 70
million years ago. No gravity was essentially the same in the
Mezozoic. Maybe the odd ppm different.


- Ian Parker
  #24  
Old February 20th 09, 07:31 PM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
Ian Parker
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Posts: 2,554
Default The Mosquito as space traveller

There is one highly significant point I would like to make. I have
explained how difficult it is to prove a negative conclusively.
Occam's razor tells us that we should try to ignore negatives (like
panspermia).

The only conclusive proof (as I think I have stated) is to find some
extraterrestrial life (any degree of complexity will do). Martian
microbes or European/Encycladean funeroles will do just fine. In the
case of Mars rocks have travelled from Mars to Earth and vice versa
(mostly though Mars Earth) so a common origin for Mars is quite
possible.

There is one additional point. The space buffs seem to be arguing that
the only "sane" space policy is a hugely expensive manned expedition
there. Contamination is absolutely certain. If astronauts are
frequently going though airlocks there will be life on Mars that has
originated on Earth. No "sane" person seems to have twigged this.
Contamination is unavoidable. Spacesuits are going to be brought into
the cabin which will be rich in bacteria.

Fortunately there are no plans for a manned expedition to Europa. We
seem to be safe there. We don't know for sure.

1) Is there life on Mars?

2) If "yes" to "1" did it originate on Mars or Earth.

After a manned expedition it is certain that 1 = yes. 2 = Earth. We
will never know if the space buffs get their way.


- Ian Parker
  #25  
Old February 20th 09, 08:24 PM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
Androcles[_8_]
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Posts: 1,135
Default The Mosquito as space traveller


"aleonis" wrote in message
...
On Feb 19, 11:32 am, Jan Panteltje wrote:
Mosquito survives 18 month in outerspaceon the ISS outside hull:


.... bull****

If it were "Picornavirus survives 18 month in (inner) space on the ISS
outside hull",
would it still be bull****?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Picornavirus


  #26  
Old February 22nd 09, 08:05 PM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
Mitchell Jones
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Posts: 67
Default The Mosquito as space traveller

In article ,
Jan Panteltje wrote:

On a sunny day (Fri, 20 Feb 2009 03:32:48 -0800 (PST)) it happened Ian Parker
wrote in
:

Maybe the old earth was much smaller, with
hardly any water, and some big comet hit it,
driving the continents apart, creating oceans,
increasing gravity, that killing all the huge
animals.


If the Earth was smaller gravity would be HIGHER


No, no, smaller = less mass = less gravity.
If you were thinking the same mass, compressed in a smaller volume,
then at the surface you would be heavier.

The idea I was suggesting, is that if some huge comet did hit the earth,
it would get into the core, and increase the mass, causing volcanism all over
the place,
and the swelling would push the continents, the solid surface layer
fragments, apart.

The resulting increase in gravity due to increased mass, would kill only the
big heavy lifeforms.


***{Hi Jan. I don't know if you have seen the material at the following
links, but it is very relevant to your line of thought.

The first supports the idea of a growing Earth, which would produce the
increase in gravity that you are speculating about:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vjgid...eature=related

Note that during the time of the dinosaurs, according to this theory,
the Earth was about the size that Mars is today. Result: less gravity,
hence larger animals.

The second link concerns the "small comet theory," according to which
the Earth is, in fact, sweeping up vastly more debris from space than
conventional scientists believe:

http://smallcomets.physics.uiowa.edu/

The two theories, taken together, are vastly stronger than either taken
by itself. Each, within the context of the other, makes perfect sense:
if either is true, then so too must be the other.

Bottom line: Truth Seekers--i.e., those who value truth more than social
expediency--will give very, very serious consideration to both of these
ideas. As for the others, well, let them howl. Turning their volume down
is why killfiles were invented, after all. :-)

--Mitchell Jones}***

************************************************** ***************
If I seem to be ignoring you, consider the possibility
that you are in my killfile. --MJ
  #27  
Old February 22nd 09, 08:44 PM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
Ian Parker
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,554
Default The Mosquito as space traveller

On 22 Feb, 20:05, Mitchell Jones wrote:
In article ,
*Jan Panteltje wrote:





On a sunny day (Fri, 20 Feb 2009 03:32:48 -0800 (PST)) it happened Ian Parker
wrote in
:


Maybe the old earth was much smaller, with
hardly any water, and some big comet hit it,
driving the continents apart, creating oceans,
increasing gravity, that killing all the huge
animals.


If the Earth was smaller gravity would be HIGHER


No, no, smaller = less mass = less gravity.
If you were thinking the same mass, compressed in a smaller volume,
then at the surface you would be heavier.


The idea I was suggesting, is that if some huge comet did hit the earth,
it would get into the core, and increase the mass, causing volcanism all over
the place,
and the swelling would push the continents, the solid surface layer
fragments, apart.


The resulting increase in gravity due to increased mass, would kill only the
big heavy lifeforms.


***{Hi Jan. I don't know if you have seen the material at the following
links, but it is very relevant to your line of thought.

The first supports the idea of a growing Earth, which would produce the
increase in gravity that you are speculating about:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vjgid...eature=related

Note that during the time of the dinosaurs, according to this theory,
the Earth was about the size that Mars is today. Result: less gravity,
hence larger animals.

The second link concerns the "small comet theory," according to which
the Earth is, in fact, sweeping up vastly more debris from space than
conventional scientists believe:

This has all been measured. The Earth indeed grew from being a small
body, but this was in the Hadean period. The amount of accretion for
the Moon, Mars and Earth has been accurately estimated

http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000M&PSA..35..173Y

Estimate based on the amount in Antarctica.

http://www.springerlink.com/content/q3g783684l353052/

History of the Earth reconstructed by isotopes.

http://smallcomets.physics.uiowa.edu/

The two theories, taken together, are vastly stronger than either taken
by itself. Each, within the context of the other, makes perfect sense:
if either is true, then so too must be the other.

Bottom line: Truth Seekers--i.e., those who value truth more than social
expediency--will give very, very serious consideration to both of these
ideas. As for the others, well, let them howl. Turning their volume down
is why killfiles were invented, after all. :-)

We should, of course always have an open mind. There is no reason to
suppose that the rate from the time of the dinosaurs to the present
was vastly different from the antarctic rate. Only in Antarchtica can
dust be foung. Elsewhere it is simply churned into the crust.


- Ian Parker
  #28  
Old February 22nd 09, 08:47 PM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
Jan Panteltje
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 453
Default The Mosquito as space traveller

On a sunny day (Sun, 22 Feb 2009 14:05:58 -0600) it happened Mitchell Jones
wrote in
:

The idea I was suggesting, is that if some huge comet did hit the earth,
it would get into the core, and increase the mass, causing volcanism all over
the place,
and the swelling would push the continents, the solid surface layer
fragments, apart.

The resulting increase in gravity due to increased mass, would kill only the
big heavy lifeforms.


***{Hi Jan. I don't know if you have seen the material at the following
links, but it is very relevant to your line of thought.

The first supports the idea of a growing Earth, which would produce the
increase in gravity that you are speculating about:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vjgid...eature=related



Nice link, nice animation too.
I find it facinating that he extrapolates to the other planets,


Note that during the time of the dinosaurs, according to this theory,
the Earth was about the size that Mars is today. Result: less gravity,
hence larger animals.

The second link concerns the "small comet theory," according to which
the Earth is, in fact, sweeping up vastly more debris from space than
conventional scientists believe:

http://smallcomets.physics.uiowa.edu/


Interesting.


The two theories, taken together, are vastly stronger than either taken
by itself. Each, within the context of the other, makes perfect sense:
if either is true, then so too must be the other.


Thank you for bringing this to my attention.


Bottom line: Truth Seekers--i.e., those who value truth more than social
expediency--will give very, very serious consideration to both of these
ideas. As for the others, well, let them howl. Turning their volume down
is why killfiles were invented, after all. :-)


Well, the world is full of parrots.
Evolution seems to have it that way.

As they all sing the same song, few brain cycles are needed to decode and ignore it.
The brain cycles are required when looking at data with open eyes.
I use no killfiles, but have stopped reading some the the 'repeats' in opinion :-)





--Mitchell Jones}***

************************************************* ****************
If I seem to be ignoring you, consider the possibility
that you are in my killfile. --MJ

  #29  
Old February 23rd 09, 12:33 AM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
BradGuth
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Posts: 21,544
Default The Mosquito as space traveller

On Feb 19, 2:32*am, Jan Panteltje wrote:
Mosquito survives 18 month in outer space on the ISS outside hull:
*http://www.en.rian.ru/analysis/20090218/120203420.html

This has large implications, as now we can see that insects have the ability to travel on a space rock,
or just by themselves using gravity assist, to other planets.

The question now comes up:
Are the aliens already here, are those mosquitos the alien invaders,
sucking our blood, looking for planets with warm blooded lifeforms?


As well as Tardigrades (water bears) suitable for naked space travel.

Too bad these and a few other samples weren't sent to Mars a decade
ago. Kinda makes you wonder why human DNA and our physiology got so
wussy.

~ BG
  #30  
Old February 23rd 09, 12:40 AM posted to sci.astro,sci.physics
Odysseus[_1_]
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Posts: 535
Default The Mosquito as space traveller

In article
,
"Tim BandTech.com" wrote:

snip

In gas clouds isn't it possible that the vacuum of space is a
falsehood? Then flying creatures of all forms may come and go as
amoebas or whatever, just flitting about in a gas cloud without a care
how long it takes to network up or head on out. Planetary forms are
then optional.


I don't think so: the actual densities in the gas clouds we see in our
Galaxy are on the order of the 'hardest' vacuum that can be created in a
laboratory, or even lower. You occasionally hear of things like the
detection of X zillion tonnes of ethanol or whatever in a nebula, but
distributed through a volume in the cubic parsecs it's extremely thin,
in the molecules (not moles!) per cubic metre.

--
Odysseus
 




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