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The perpetual calendar



 
 
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  #1171  
Old April 5th 10, 06:53 AM posted to sci.lang,alt.usage.english,sci.astro
Tony Cooper
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Posts: 21
Default "Year of Our Lord" in the news

On Mon, 05 Apr 2010 00:30:41 -0400, wrote:

On Sat, 03 Apr 2010 07:55:08 +0800, Robert Bannister
wrote:

wrote:

What I don't understand is why those who don't believe in Jesus Christ
keep calling him Jesus Christ. Isn't the core of the question whether
he was a christ or not? It seems to me they weaken the appearance of
their argument, or the argument itself, when they call him by a title
one would otherwise think they think he doesn't deserve.


Because most people think "Christ" is his surname - Mrs Mary Christ had
a baby and called it Jesus Harold Christ.


Okay, you guys have convinced me that is the reason, even among those
with Jewish or Christian backgrounds.

I guess the ex(?)-governor of Florida doesn't help.


Most of us in Florida wish he had been ex- long before this.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Ads
  #1172  
Old April 10th 10, 01:19 PM posted to sci.lang,alt.usage.english,sci.astro
Peter T. Daniels
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Posts: 200
Default The perpetual calendar

On Apr 4, 8:03*pm, Yusuf B Gursey wrote:

A more logical name for the A.D. (or C.E.) calendar is "Gregorian"
since Pope Gregory sponsored the calendar reform that replace the
previous Julian calendar. Although Gregory was in part motivated by
religious factors, he also recognized that the Julian calendar simply
did not work and was not accurate for keeping time in the Earth-Sun
system. Saying Gregorian calendar should not be any more offensive
than saying, for example, Celsius temperature scale, Dewey decimal
system or Richter
scale, all of which are named for ordinary human beings associated
closely with them.

Thus, we might say A.H. for a date strictly related to Islam and A.D.
for a date strictly relate to Christianity but simply G. or A.G. for
a
date on the Gregorian calendar that is not used almost universally
for
everyday timekeeping.


Except that Mr. Gregory had nothing to do with determining the number
of the year.
  #1173  
Old April 14th 10, 01:37 AM posted to sci.lang,alt.usage.english,sci.astro
Peter T. Daniels
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Posts: 200
Default "Year of Our Lord" in the news

On Apr 13, 6:14*pm, Oliver Cromm wrote:
* Evan Kirshenbaum:

tony cooper writes:


My diploma from Northwestern University (Evanston, IL, USA) has "In
the year of our Lord" on it.


According to Stanford, I graduated


* * on the Fourteenth Day of June in the Year One Thousand Nine
* * Hundred and Eighty-Seven the Two Hundred-Eleventh Year of the
* * Republic and the Ninety-Sixth Academic Year of the University.


(sic on the lack of commas). * *


In my dentist's office I saw that his was in Latin (from McGill
University in Montreal).

I find it amusing at times how North Americans hold on to that
traditional pompousness. Reminds me of their feudal taste in furniture,
all while seeing themselves as leading modern democracy. On my diplomas
from both Germany and Japan, the year is of course written in numbers,
no Latin (or classical Chinese) is used, and there's no reference to
religion, the Tenno, or anything of that general nature.


My Cornell diploma is written in English.

What "feudal taste in furniture"?
  #1174  
Old April 15th 10, 02:50 AM posted to sci.lang,alt.usage.english,sci.astro
Oliver Cromm
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Posts: 3
Default "Year of Our Lord" in the news

* Tak To:

Oliver Cromm wrote:
* Evan Kirshenbaum:

tony cooper writes:

My diploma from Northwestern University (Evanston, IL, USA) has "In
the year of our Lord" on it.
According to Stanford, I graduated

on the Fourteenth Day of June in the Year One Thousand Nine
Hundred and Eighty-Seven the Two Hundred-Eleventh Year of the
Republic and the Ninety-Sixth Academic Year of the University.

(sic on the lack of commas).


In my dentist's office I saw that his was in Latin (from McGill
University in Montreal).

I find it amusing at times how North Americans hold on to that
traditional pompousness. Reminds me of their feudal taste in furniture,
all while seeing themselves as leading modern democracy. On my diplomas
from both Germany and Japan, the year is of course written in numbers,
no Latin (or classical Chinese) is used, and there's no reference to
religion, the Tenno, or anything of that general nature.


Your diploma from Japan is in Japanese, but refers to
the year with just numbers and no reignal name??


Hm, sounds unlikely. Guess I should have checked on that one before
sending it. No, the date is in the Japanese format, so there's an
indirect reference to the tenno.

--
GOGELICH,gogelig, (...) 'fröhlich, lustig, ausgelassen'
GRIMM, Deutsches Wörterbuch
  #1175  
Old April 18th 10, 09:37 PM posted to sci.lang,alt.usage.english,sci.astro
Yusuf B Gursey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 78
Default The perpetual calendar

On Apr 10, 8:19*am, "Peter T. Daniels" wrote:
On Apr 4, 8:03*pm, Yusuf B Gursey wrote:





A more logical name for the A.D. (or C.E.) calendar is "Gregorian"
since Pope Gregory sponsored the calendar reform that replace the
previous Julian calendar. Although Gregory was in part motivated by
religious factors, he also recognized that the Julian calendar simply
did not work and was not accurate for keeping time in the Earth-Sun
system. Saying Gregorian calendar should not be any more offensive
than saying, for example, Celsius temperature scale, Dewey decimal
system or Richter
scale, all of which are named for ordinary human beings associated
closely with them.


Thus, we might say A.H. for a date strictly related to Islam and A.D.
for a date strictly relate to Christianity but simply G. or A.G. for
a
date on the Gregorian calendar that is not used almost universally
for
everyday timekeeping.


Except that Mr. Gregory had nothing to do with determining the number
of the year.



I agree, that was the weak point of poster I quoted.
  #1176  
Old August 9th 11, 02:55 PM posted to alt.usage.english,sci.lang,sci.astro,sci.math
Jonathan de Boyne Pollard
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default The perpetual calendar

Every calendar I have seen in the United States starts on Sunday.

From which statement we can deduce that (a) Mrs Doe is in the United
States but simply hasn't seen all that many different calendars, or (b)
Mrs Doe has seen calendars not starting the week with Sunday but didn't
see them in the United States, or (c) Mrs Doe isn't in the United States
in the first place and has seen zero calendars there.
  #1177  
Old August 9th 11, 03:15 PM posted to alt.usage.english,sci.astro
Jonathan de Boyne Pollard
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default The perpetual calendar

WIWAL, the week clearly started on Saturday...

Lawyers start the week on Saturday?

all you had to do to prove it was to look at TV Guide...what's more, each day
began at 6:00am, [...]


This is also true for non-lawyers reading TV listings.

Now (strangely given that *all* stations stay on the air round the clock if only
to air infomercials)TV Guide has decided [...]


This, however, is not true. In these days of digital television, some
stations go off the air entirely at certain times of day and their
bandwidth is taken up by other stations.
  #1178  
Old August 9th 11, 05:14 PM posted to alt.usage.english,sci.astro
David Hatunen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default The perpetual calendar

On Tue, 09 Aug 2011 15:15:46 +0100, Jonathan de Boyne Pollard wrote:

WIWAL, the week clearly started on Saturday...


Lawyers start the week on Saturday?

all you had to do to prove it was to look at TV Guide...what's more,
each day
began at 6:00am, [...]


This is also true for non-lawyers reading TV listings.

Now (strangely given that *all* stations stay on the air round the
clock if only to air infomercials)TV Guide has decided [...]


This, however, is not true. In these days of digital television, some
stations go off the air entirely at certain times of day and their
bandwidth is taken up by other stations.


If you are talking about over-the-air TV stations in the same service
area, I'd like some specific examples of this, perhaps an FCC channel
assignment chart.

If you are referring to digital sub-channels, well, that's a different
thing, and leads to the question of how you define a "station".

Some radio stations in the US do leave the air and are replaced by other
stations on the same frequency. And some radio stations are daylight-only
stations, leaving the air at sunset. A local example is the University of
Arizona's public AM station, KUAZ-AM. It's a 25 kilowatt station, which
is quite powerful for a local station, and would interfere with other
stations on the same frequency around the country when night time skip
begins. Most of the powerful AM stations broadcast at 50 kilowatts and
are so-called "clear channel" stations so there are no other stations on
the same frequency.

--
Dave Hatunen: Free Baja Arizona
  #1179  
Old August 9th 11, 06:48 PM posted to alt.usage.english,sci.astro
Skitt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 25
Default The perpetual calendar

Jonathan de Boyne Pollard wrote:

WIWAL, the week clearly started on Saturday...


Lawyers start the week on Saturday?


Lockheed Martin payroll accounting weeks start on Saturdays, unless they
have changed things since I retired.
--
Skitt (SF Bay Area)
http://come.to/skitt
  #1180  
Old August 9th 11, 07:43 PM posted to alt.usage.english,sci.astro
Frank S
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default The perpetual calendar


"Skitt" wrote in message
...
Jonathan de Boyne Pollard wrote:

WIWAL, the week clearly started on Saturday...


Lawyers start the week on Saturday?


Lockheed Martin payroll accounting weeks start on Saturdays, unless they
have changed things since I retired.


County pay period ended Thursday, 11:59pm and a bit; during the era of
hand-entered and -verified hours the cards were "turned in" at noon on
Thursday. Twelve hours of conjecture, if not deceit.

--
Frank ess

 




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