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Reason for wide range of star behavior



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 5th 16, 08:38 AM posted to sci.astro
Poutnik[_5_]
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Posts: 68
Default Reason for wide range of star behavior

Hello,

I have noticed there is quite a lot of different star behaviours.

Are the star properties and behaviour
more or less determined by initial mass and evolution stage ?

Or are there a parallel evolution paths possible ?

I suppose being in binary system
can create other dimension to variability.

How much is eventually in this context significant
difference in initial composition,
like stars of the 1st generation with initial cosmological composition,
versus later generations with some extra helium and heavier elements ?

--
Poutnik ( the Czech word for a wanderer )

Knowledge makes great men humble, but small men arrogant.
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  #2  
Old January 5th 16, 08:43 AM posted to sci.astro
Poutnik[_5_]
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Posts: 68
Default Reason for wide range of star behavior

Dne 05/01/2016 v 08:38 Poutnik napsal(a):

Are the star properties and behaviour
more or less determined by initial mass and evolution stage ?

Or are there a parallel evolution paths possible ?


P.S.: I mean is there known any star evolution divergence ?

--
Poutnik ( the Czech word for a wanderer )

Knowledge makes great men humble, but small men arrogant.
  #3  
Old January 5th 16, 10:53 AM posted to sci.astro
Mike Dworetsky
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Posts: 715
Default Reason for wide range of star behavior

Poutnik wrote:
Hello,

I have noticed there is quite a lot of different star behaviours.

Are the star properties and behaviour
more or less determined by initial mass and evolution stage ?


To a first approximation, yes. This is the essence of the Russell-Vogt
theorem, that a star's initial mass determines its subsequent evolution.


Or are there a parallel evolution paths possible ?


There can be some variations due to differences in composition (producing
differences in opacity of material), initial rate of rotation, magnetic
fields, and presence in a (close) binary system.


I suppose being in binary system
can create other dimension to variability.

How much is eventually in this context significant
difference in initial composition,
like stars of the 1st generation with initial cosmological
composition, versus later generations with some extra helium and
heavier elements ?


Go back and review in textbooks the studies of cluster colour-magnitude
diagrams for population I and population II, which have differences due to
composition and age.

--
Mike Dworetsky

(Remove pants sp*mbl*ck to reply)

  #4  
Old January 5th 16, 12:50 PM posted to sci.astro
Martin Brown
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Posts: 1,707
Default Reason for wide range of star behavior

On 05/01/2016 07:38, Poutnik wrote:
Hello,

I have noticed there is quite a lot of different star behaviours.

Are the star properties and behaviour
more or less determined by initial mass and evolution stage ?


To a first approximation yes.
Initial mass and age determine what you see.

Or are there a parallel evolution paths possible ?

I suppose being in binary system
can create other dimension to variability.


Dwarf nova binaries, cataclysmic variables and the like where matter
accretes from the first star to reach giant stage onto the other and
then vice-versa are about the only major exceptions.

http://www.star.le.ac.uk/~pae9/twitter/DNe.html

I recall a talk by one of the researchers in that field whimsically
titled "Can a degenerate white dwarf find lasting happiness in the arms
of a blue giant?" - spoiler alert sadly the answer is no.

How much is eventually in this context significant
difference in initial composition,
like stars of the 1st generation with initial cosmological composition,
versus later generations with some extra helium and heavier elements ?


There are visible differences in the absorption lines of early low
metalicity stars.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
 




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