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Mercury - Is it a core?



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 16th 04, 02:00 AM
Aunt Buffy
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Default Mercury - Is it a core?

Apparently Mercury is so dense...it is believed to be 2/3 iron.
1. Is there any evidence to suggest that Mercury might not have started out
in its present location? (e.g. nature of orbit)
2. Now for the dumb question: Is there a link between Mercury and the
Asteroid belt?
3. What do u feel about a chocolate bar called Mercury? - Curry flavoured
one end and RADOX BLUE on the other.



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  #2  
Old July 16th 04, 03:32 AM
Peter Webb
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"Aunt Buffy" wrote in message
...
Apparently Mercury is so dense...it is believed to be 2/3 iron.


As you get closer to the Sun, it gets hotter and so the lighter elements and
compounds (and those that form gasses at lower temperatures) tend to get
boiled off.

1. Is there any evidence to suggest that Mercury might not have started

out
in its present location? (e.g. nature of orbit)


No.

2. Now for the dumb question: Is there a link between Mercury and the
Asteroid belt?


No.

3. What do u feel about a chocolate bar called Mercury? - Curry flavoured
one end and RADOX BLUE on the other.


I feel glad they aren't sold in Australia.


  #3  
Old July 16th 04, 03:32 AM
Peter Webb
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"Aunt Buffy" wrote in message
...
Apparently Mercury is so dense...it is believed to be 2/3 iron.


As you get closer to the Sun, it gets hotter and so the lighter elements and
compounds (and those that form gasses at lower temperatures) tend to get
boiled off.

1. Is there any evidence to suggest that Mercury might not have started

out
in its present location? (e.g. nature of orbit)


No.

2. Now for the dumb question: Is there a link between Mercury and the
Asteroid belt?


No.

3. What do u feel about a chocolate bar called Mercury? - Curry flavoured
one end and RADOX BLUE on the other.


I feel glad they aren't sold in Australia.


  #4  
Old July 16th 04, 09:16 PM
Vincent D. DeSimone
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Apparently Mercury is so dense...it is believed to be 2/3 iron.
1. Is there any evidence to suggest that Mercury might not have started out
in its present location? (e.g. nature of orbit)
2. Now for the dumb question: Is there a link between Mercury and the
Asteroid belt?


I also have always wondered about the large eccentricity of Mercury's orbit
as well as its high density. It has been theorized that the Moon was
created when a "Mars sized" planet had a grazing collision with the Earth
billions of years ago during the early history of the solar system. The
planet that grazed Earth would have probably had its outer layers ripped
away leaving a jumbled up, dense inner core, and nobody knows what happened
to that planet after the collision. Perhaps the loss of mass / momentum
added to the billiard ball effects of orbital mechanics may have created
Mercury in its present orbit?

  #5  
Old July 16th 04, 09:16 PM
Vincent D. DeSimone
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Posts: n/a
Default


Apparently Mercury is so dense...it is believed to be 2/3 iron.
1. Is there any evidence to suggest that Mercury might not have started out
in its present location? (e.g. nature of orbit)
2. Now for the dumb question: Is there a link between Mercury and the
Asteroid belt?


I also have always wondered about the large eccentricity of Mercury's orbit
as well as its high density. It has been theorized that the Moon was
created when a "Mars sized" planet had a grazing collision with the Earth
billions of years ago during the early history of the solar system. The
planet that grazed Earth would have probably had its outer layers ripped
away leaving a jumbled up, dense inner core, and nobody knows what happened
to that planet after the collision. Perhaps the loss of mass / momentum
added to the billiard ball effects of orbital mechanics may have created
Mercury in its present orbit?

  #6  
Old July 16th 04, 10:51 PM
G=EMC^2 Glazier
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Mercury has all those craters. Does anyone know what the temperature
might be of a crater that's in the shade.? Bert

  #7  
Old July 16th 04, 10:51 PM
G=EMC^2 Glazier
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Mercury has all those craters. Does anyone know what the temperature
might be of a crater that's in the shade.? Bert

  #10  
Old July 17th 04, 09:43 AM
Jonathan Silverlight
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In message , Double-A
writes
(G=EMC^2 Glazier) wrote in message
...
Mercury has all those craters. Does anyone know what the temperature
might be of a crater that's in the shade.? Bert



Well, the craters near the poles contain something shiny, which is
suspected to be ice. There are places in those craters where the sun
never shines. NASA has just announced a probe will be sent in 2012 to
take a more extensive survey of Mercury and examine more closely those
polar craters, which seemingly contain ice. The discovery of ice on
the Moon makes it more likely.


Don't you have that backwards? The reports of ice at the Moon's poles
have been questioned (see
http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/no_ice_moon_south_pole.html,
for instance), while the Mercury results still seem quite strong.
--
What have they got to hide? Release the full Beagle 2 report.
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