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Anyone know what these sensors are?



 
 
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  #11  
Old February 15th 19, 03:14 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
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Default Anyone know what these sensors are?

On Thursday, 14 February 2019 09:45:31 UTC-5, Chris L Peterson wrote:
On Wed, 13 Feb 2019 18:25:20 -0800 (PST), RichA
wrote:

Theory goes back to film, less enlargement equals higher quality.


Yes, but even the best film has very low resolution compared with
modern electronic sensors. In essence, film as large "pixels", so you
need to use a larger frame in order to get a high "pixel count". This
sensor, however, has an inherently low pixel count. It cannot produce
a very high resolution image, which was the intent with large format
film cameras.

BUt I wonder what the low-light performance would be like with 75um pixels?


Low light performance comes down to how many photons you collect
(which is determined by aperture), and to S/N issues. Most modern
sensors already have high quantum efficiencies, meaning they record
most of the photons that hit them- there's not much room for
improvement there. And sensors have steadily reducing read noise
levels. So the most important thing just comes down to collecting more
photons, and a large sensor is useful for that. (It's also useful for
collecting more photons before it overflows, although that's less true
for CMOS devices than for CCDs. More photons means more dynamic range.
But as previously noted, this device doesn't seem to have much
different dynamic range than existing smaller sensors.)

Still can't really figure much a use case for this device.


Large sensors or small sensors, pixel size ultimately determines visible noise so a 35mm sensor with the same pixel size as an APS sensor is going to have the same visible noise level, only it will cover a larger area with a given focal length lens. This monster sensor has huge pixels, huge well-capacities and should produce less visible noise over a given area than anything else available today.
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  #12  
Old February 15th 19, 03:33 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Chris L Peterson
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Posts: 9,985
Default Anyone know what these sensors are?

On Fri, 15 Feb 2019 06:14:09 -0800 (PST), RichA
wrote:

Large sensors or small sensors, pixel size ultimately determines visible noise so a 35mm sensor with the same pixel size as an APS sensor is going to have the same visible noise level, only it will cover a larger area with a given focal length lens. This monster sensor has huge pixels, huge well-capacities and should produce less visible noise over a given area than anything else available today.


I don't know what "visible noise" is. With electronic sensors, there
is instrumental noise- mainly dark current noise and readout noise,
and there is the statistical noise present on any signal- the square
root of the number of photons recorded.

For ordinary imaging (short exposure) dark current noise is negligible
and invisible. Readout noise is usually not visible with modern
sensors. So the noise that we see is purely a function of how many
photons we record (which is why we see noise in dark areas but not
light ones). It has nothing to do with pixel size, except indirectly
through the mechanisms I referred to previously.
  #13  
Old February 15th 19, 11:33 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
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Posts: 1,055
Default Anyone know what these sensors are?

Visible as in in the image whether viewed on screen or printed. No one cares about the verbiage and the larger each pixel, the lower the visible noise at higher ISO. This is why Sony release a 12mp full-frame sensor in addition to their 24 and 45mp sensors.
  #14  
Old February 16th 19, 01:27 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Chris L Peterson
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Posts: 9,985
Default Anyone know what these sensors are?

On Fri, 15 Feb 2019 14:33:19 -0800 (PST), RichA
wrote:

Visible as in in the image whether viewed on screen or printed. No one cares about the verbiage and the larger each pixel, the lower the visible noise at higher ISO.


Larger pixels only improve the noise if they are able to accumulate
more electrons (photons). The dynamic range of this large sensor
appears to be about the same as any good DSLR. So no, it won't have
significantly lower noise simply because it has large pixels.
 




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