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Mercury in direct motion



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 24th 19, 06:48 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Mercury in direct motion

https://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data...current_c3.gif

The stars change their position from left to right and parallel to the orbital plane so we are seeing the inner solar system as it exists minus daily rotation and from the perspective of orbital motion.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lXABy7eYvIA

If people visit the satellite website around June they will see Venus enter observations as it moves behind the Sun while Mercury will return into view sometime in March this year as it runs in front of the Sun as opposed to its present motion behind the Sun.



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  #2  
Old January 25th 19, 08:44 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Mercury in direct motion

The direct/retrogrades of Venus and Mercury are much more intricate to discern if people insist on using the background stars, however, it doesn't detract from the beautiful spectacle of those planets passing in front and behind the Sun like Jupiter's satellites are seen to run a circuit of their parent planet.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L74B98ITKEA&t=145s

As the Earth moves slower hence the background stars change their position from left to right, when Venus and Mercury run from left to right, they are moving faster than the change in position of the stars from left to right (retrograde motion)and as they run behind the Sun in the opposite direction (direct motion) to the change in the stars from left to right.

The slower moving planets in that time lapse will always be seen to move direct as those planets don't show the centre of their retrograde motions until the Earth has overtaken them until the Earth is between them and the Sun..

The 'planets today' website doesn't match what is actually seen so it is omitted in lieu of animation that screens out a celestial sphere. This honours the work done by the original Sun centred astronomers who did not have the ability screen out the central Sun's glare as we look inwards to our parent star and the faster moving planets.

Celebrate something good for a change as though you could actually appreciate what is in front of you. It doesn't matter anyway as wider society already does even in an incomplete form.

  #3  
Old January 25th 19, 08:58 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Mercury in direct motion

Much easier to let the timelapse explain things as it becomes a tangled descriptive issue otherwise -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L74B98ITKEA&t=156s


The stars move constantly from left to right due to the Earth's orbital motion and a stationary Sun.

No fixed background of stars by which to gauge the faster motions of the inner planets.

When the motions of the faster planets are referenced to the stationary Sun, their motions against the background stars become secondary even when they display direct/retrograde motions.

The retrograde motion of the faster moving planets is determined by their motion in front of the Sun and between the Earth. Their direct motion against the background stars is when they pass behind the Sun.

The direct/retrogrades are not an illusion but a signature of a closed orbital loop -

https://www.popastro.com/images/plan...ary%202012.jpg


So, the historical trajectory is that direct/retrogrades of the slower planets were discovered 500 years ago and broke the geocentric hold on astronomy whereas today satellite imaging and common sense adds to the story which should delight those who can be inspired.











  #4  
Old February 16th 19, 09:28 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
corvastro
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Default Mercury in direct motion

On Friday, January 25, 2019 at 12:58:32 PM UTC-8, Gerald Kelleher wrote:
Much easier to let the timelapse explain things as it becomes a tangled descriptive issue otherwise -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L74B98ITKEA&t=156s


The stars move constantly from left to right due to the Earth's orbital motion and a stationary Sun.

No fixed background of stars by which to gauge the faster motions of the inner planets.

When the motions of the faster planets are referenced to the stationary Sun, their motions against the background stars become secondary even when they display direct/retrograde motions.

The retrograde motion of the faster moving planets is determined by their motion in front of the Sun and between the Earth. Their direct motion against the background stars is when they pass behind the Sun.

The direct/retrogrades are not an illusion but a signature of a closed orbital loop -

https://www.popastro.com/images/plan...ary%202012.jpg


So, the historical trajectory is that direct/retrogrades of the slower planets were discovered 500 years ago and broke the geocentric hold on astronomy whereas today satellite imaging and common sense adds to the story which should delight those who can be inspired.


Direct/Retrograde motions were long before 500 years ago, possibly 3000 years or more. That is the reason the planets were called "wandering stars".
  #5  
Old February 16th 19, 07:14 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Posts: 1,528
Default Mercury in direct motion

On Saturday, February 16, 2019 at 9:28:10 AM UTC, corvastro wrote:
On Friday, January 25, 2019 at 12:58:32 PM UTC-8, Gerald Kelleher wrote:
Much easier to let the timelapse explain things as it becomes a tangled descriptive issue otherwise -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L74B98ITKEA&t=156s


The stars move constantly from left to right due to the Earth's orbital motion and a stationary Sun.

No fixed background of stars by which to gauge the faster motions of the inner planets.

When the motions of the faster planets are referenced to the stationary Sun, their motions against the background stars become secondary even when they display direct/retrograde motions.

The retrograde motion of the faster moving planets is determined by their motion in front of the Sun and between the Earth. Their direct motion against the background stars is when they pass behind the Sun.

The direct/retrogrades are not an illusion but a signature of a closed orbital loop -

https://www.popastro.com/images/plan...ary%202012.jpg


So, the historical trajectory is that direct/retrogrades of the slower planets were discovered 500 years ago and broke the geocentric hold on astronomy whereas today satellite imaging and common sense adds to the story which should delight those who can be inspired.


Direct/Retrograde motions were long before 500 years ago, possibly 3000 years or more. That is the reason the planets were called "wandering stars".


Newbies like you are so endearing as they are hardly aware the technical details which others in the newsgroup should have adopted over a decade ago.

The first Sun-centred astronomers worked off the Ptolemaic framework where the Sun moves directly through the constellations whereas the planets wander north and South of that line -

http://community.dur.ac.uk/john.luce...n_ecliptic.gif

"Moreover, we see the other five planets also retrograde at times, and
stationary at either end [of the regression]. And whereas the sun
always advances along its own direct path, they wander in various
ways, straying sometimes to the south and sometimes to the north; that
is why they are called "planets" [wanderers]. Copernicus


The RA/Dec gob****es have the Sun also wander against the constellations which is why they have turned into nuisances rather than have any serious interest in astronomy -

http://community.dur.ac.uk/john.luce...solar_year.gif

The reason there is little traffic through this newsgroup despite the absence of spam and whatnot is that any lower form of reasoning and interpretation doesn't survive for long or is restricted to a magnification/identification exercise.

Pity there is nobody reliable in the newsgroup to bring you up to speed.

 




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