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Does this mean you could land on Uranus or Neptune?



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 22nd 18, 04:20 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
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Posts: 1,055
Default Does this mean you could land on Uranus or Neptune?

They were re-classified as "ice-giants" instead of "gas-giants" like Saturn and Jupiter. Jupiter and Saturn have atmospheres that become virtually liquid the deeper you go, but this article seems to imply there may be solid surfaces on Uranus and Neptune. This is the first I've read about it.

https://phys.org/news/2018-12-big-sp...-lopsided.html

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  #2  
Old December 22nd 18, 04:38 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Scott Kozel
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Posts: 10
Default Does this mean you could land on Uranus or Neptune?

On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:20:12 PM UTC-5, RichA wrote:
They were re-classified as "ice-giants" instead of "gas-giants" like Saturn and Jupiter. Jupiter and Saturn have atmospheres that become virtually liquid the deeper you go, but this article seems to imply there may be solid surfaces on Uranus and Neptune. This is the first I've read about it.

https://phys.org/news/2018-12-big-sp...-lopsided.html


"Uranus was named for the Greek god of the sky. Its name often generates
juvenile humor when it is wrongly pronounced like a body part. (It's correctly
pronounced YUR'-uh-nus.)"

Then why is the element named after the planet pronounced yur-AIN'-e-um?
Because the most recognized pronunciation for the planet is yur-AIN'-us.

Some scientists were the ones who changed the pronunciation because of the
scatological jokes about it. Unfortunately their pronunciation is worse --
it sounds like "urine".
  #3  
Old December 22nd 18, 10:17 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
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Posts: 1,055
Default Does this mean you could land on Uranus or Neptune?

On Friday, 21 December 2018 23:38:45 UTC-5, Scott Kozel wrote:
On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:20:12 PM UTC-5, RichA wrote:
They were re-classified as "ice-giants" instead of "gas-giants" like Saturn and Jupiter. Jupiter and Saturn have atmospheres that become virtually liquid the deeper you go, but this article seems to imply there may be solid surfaces on Uranus and Neptune. This is the first I've read about it.

https://phys.org/news/2018-12-big-sp...-lopsided.html


"Uranus was named for the Greek god of the sky. Its name often generates
juvenile humor when it is wrongly pronounced like a body part. (It's correctly
pronounced YUR'-uh-nus.)"

Then why is the element named after the planet pronounced yur-AIN'-e-um?
Because the most recognized pronunciation for the planet is yur-AIN'-us.

Some scientists were the ones who changed the pronunciation because of the
scatological jokes about it. Unfortunately their pronunciation is worse --
it sounds like "urine".


Despite the production of more geniuses than any other country, the average American seems to worship ignorance as some kind of goal.
  #4  
Old December 22nd 18, 01:01 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Scott Kozel
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Posts: 10
Default Does this mean you could land on Uranus or Neptune?

On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 5:17:10 AM UTC-5, RichA wrote:
On Friday, 21 December 2018 23:38:45 UTC-5, Scott Kozel wrote:
On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:20:12 PM UTC-5, RichA wrote:
They were re-classified as "ice-giants" instead of "gas-giants" like Saturn and Jupiter. Jupiter and Saturn have atmospheres that become virtually liquid the deeper you go, but this article seems to imply there may be solid surfaces on Uranus and Neptune. This is the first I've read about it..

https://phys.org/news/2018-12-big-sp...-lopsided.html


"Uranus was named for the Greek god of the sky. Its name often generates
juvenile humor when it is wrongly pronounced like a body part. (It's correctly
pronounced YUR'-uh-nus.)"

Then why is the element named after the planet pronounced yur-AIN'-e-um?
Because the most recognized pronunciation for the planet is yur-AIN'-us..

Some scientists were the ones who changed the pronunciation because of the
scatological jokes about it. Unfortunately their pronunciation is worse --
it sounds like "urine".


Despite the production of more geniuses than any other country, the average
American seems to worship ignorance as some kind of goal.


The average American is in need of an attitude adjustment as well.
  #5  
Old December 22nd 18, 02:10 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
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Posts: 1,055
Default Does this mean you could land on Uranus or Neptune?

On Saturday, 22 December 2018 08:01:17 UTC-5, Scott Kozel wrote:
On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 5:17:10 AM UTC-5, RichA wrote:
On Friday, 21 December 2018 23:38:45 UTC-5, Scott Kozel wrote:
On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:20:12 PM UTC-5, RichA wrote:
They were re-classified as "ice-giants" instead of "gas-giants" like Saturn and Jupiter. Jupiter and Saturn have atmospheres that become virtually liquid the deeper you go, but this article seems to imply there may be solid surfaces on Uranus and Neptune. This is the first I've read about it.

https://phys.org/news/2018-12-big-sp...-lopsided.html

"Uranus was named for the Greek god of the sky. Its name often generates
juvenile humor when it is wrongly pronounced like a body part. (It's correctly
pronounced YUR'-uh-nus.)"

Then why is the element named after the planet pronounced yur-AIN'-e-um?
Because the most recognized pronunciation for the planet is yur-AIN'-us.

Some scientists were the ones who changed the pronunciation because of the
scatological jokes about it. Unfortunately their pronunciation is worse --
it sounds like "urine".


Despite the production of more geniuses than any other country, the average
American seems to worship ignorance as some kind of goal.


The average American is in need of an attitude adjustment as well.


You read some of the comments in the physics lectures on youtube, it's like they're trying to train apes.
  #6  
Old December 22nd 18, 03:43 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Chris L Peterson
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Posts: 9,985
Default Does this mean you could land on Uranus or Neptune?

On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 20:38:42 -0800 (PST), Scott Kozel
wrote:

On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:20:12 PM UTC-5, RichA wrote:
They were re-classified as "ice-giants" instead of "gas-giants" like Saturn and Jupiter. Jupiter and Saturn have atmospheres that become virtually liquid the deeper you go, but this article seems to imply there may be solid surfaces on Uranus and Neptune. This is the first I've read about it.

https://phys.org/news/2018-12-big-sp...-lopsided.html


"Uranus was named for the Greek god of the sky. Its name often generates
juvenile humor when it is wrongly pronounced like a body part. (It's correctly
pronounced YUR'-uh-nus.)"

Then why is the element named after the planet pronounced yur-AIN'-e-um?
Because the most recognized pronunciation for the planet is yur-AIN'-us.

Some scientists were the ones who changed the pronunciation because of the
scatological jokes about it. Unfortunately their pronunciation is worse --
it sounds like "urine".


Which is, of course, why scientists by the year 3000 renamed the
planet. To Urectum.
  #7  
Old December 22nd 18, 05:14 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Scott Kozel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10
Default Does this mean you could land on Uranus or Neptune?

On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 9:10:51 AM UTC-5, RichA wrote:
On Saturday, 22 December 2018 08:01:17 UTC-5, Scott Kozel wrote:
On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 5:17:10 AM UTC-5, RichA wrote:
On Friday, 21 December 2018 23:38:45 UTC-5, Scott Kozel wrote:
On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:20:12 PM UTC-5, RichA wrote:
They were re-classified as "ice-giants" instead of "gas-giants" like Saturn and Jupiter. Jupiter and Saturn have atmospheres that become virtually liquid the deeper you go, but this article seems to imply there may be solid surfaces on Uranus and Neptune. This is the first I've read about it.

https://phys.org/news/2018-12-big-sp...-lopsided.html

"Uranus was named for the Greek god of the sky. Its name often generates
juvenile humor when it is wrongly pronounced like a body part. (It's correctly
pronounced YUR'-uh-nus.)"

Then why is the element named after the planet pronounced yur-AIN'-e-um?
Because the most recognized pronunciation for the planet is yur-AIN'-us.

Some scientists were the ones who changed the pronunciation because of the
scatological jokes about it. Unfortunately their pronunciation is worse --
it sounds like "urine".

Despite the production of more geniuses than any other country, the average
American seems to worship ignorance as some kind of goal.


The average American is in need of an attitude adjustment as well.


You read some of the comments in the physics lectures on youtube, it's like
they're trying to train apes.


Most websites and books still don't have it right as to how to explain
how electricity operates, i.e. using inappropriate analogies about voltage,
amperage and wattage.

  #8  
Old December 22nd 18, 05:17 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Scott Kozel
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Posts: 10
Default Does this mean you could land on Uranus or Neptune?

On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 10:43:57 AM UTC-5, Chris L Peterson wrote:
On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 20:38:42 -0800 (PST), Scott Kozel
wrote:
On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:20:12 PM UTC-5, RichA wrote:
They were re-classified as "ice-giants" instead of "gas-giants" like Saturn and Jupiter. Jupiter and Saturn have atmospheres that become virtually liquid the deeper you go, but this article seems to imply there may be solid surfaces on Uranus and Neptune. This is the first I've read about it.

https://phys.org/news/2018-12-big-sp...-lopsided.html


"Uranus was named for the Greek god of the sky. Its name often generates
juvenile humor when it is wrongly pronounced like a body part. (It's correctly
pronounced YUR'-uh-nus.)"

Then why is the element named after the planet pronounced yur-AIN'-e-um?
Because the most recognized pronunciation for the planet is yur-AIN'-us.

Some scientists were the ones who changed the pronunciation because of the
scatological jokes about it. Unfortunately their pronunciation is worse --
it sounds like "urine".


Which is, of course, why scientists by the year 3000 renamed the
planet. To Urectum.


This blog comment may be the best explanation that I have seen --

"Uranus was changed to "URINE-us" in 1986(? - maybe '85) when one of the space
probes was preparing to do it's fly-by. Newscasters around the country realized
that three weeks of "your-anus" would never work, especially when also tossing
in the reference to a "deep space probe". The pronounciation change was
justified with the Latin pronounciation information. I blame Tom Brokaw."
  #9  
Old February 16th 19, 07:20 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
corvastro
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Posts: 19
Default Does this mean you could land on Uranus or Neptune?

On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 9:17:26 AM UTC-8, Scott Kozel wrote:
On Saturday, December 22, 2018 at 10:43:57 AM UTC-5, Chris L Peterson wrote:
On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 20:38:42 -0800 (PST), Scott Kozel
wrote:
On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:20:12 PM UTC-5, RichA wrote:
They were re-classified as "ice-giants" instead of "gas-giants" like Saturn and Jupiter. Jupiter and Saturn have atmospheres that become virtually liquid the deeper you go, but this article seems to imply there may be solid surfaces on Uranus and Neptune. This is the first I've read about it.

https://phys.org/news/2018-12-big-sp...-lopsided.html

"Uranus was named for the Greek god of the sky. Its name often generates
juvenile humor when it is wrongly pronounced like a body part. (It's correctly
pronounced YUR'-uh-nus.)"

Then why is the element named after the planet pronounced yur-AIN'-e-um?
Because the most recognized pronunciation for the planet is yur-AIN'-us.

Some scientists were the ones who changed the pronunciation because of the
scatological jokes about it. Unfortunately their pronunciation is worse --
it sounds like "urine".


Which is, of course, why scientists by the year 3000 renamed the
planet. To Urectum.


This blog comment may be the best explanation that I have seen --

"Uranus was changed to "URINE-us" in 1986(? - maybe '85) when one of the space
probes was preparing to do it's fly-by. Newscasters around the country realized
that three weeks of "your-anus" would never work, especially when also tossing
in the reference to a "deep space probe". The pronounciation change was
justified with the Latin pronounciation information. I blame Tom Brokaw."


It would be better to change it to "You rain us".

  #10  
Old February 17th 19, 02:40 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Quadibloc
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Posts: 7,003
Default Does this mean you could land on Uranus or Neptune?

Why not pronounce it "Ouranos"?
 




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