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(Poll) Space Tourism



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 20th 06, 08:41 PM posted to rec.sport.pro-wrestling,sci.space.policy,sci.space.shuttle,sci.space.station,sci.space.history
--
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Posts: 4
Default (Poll) Space Tourism

When it becomes available and reasonably priced do you plan on
becoming a Space Tourist?


That Virgin Galactic crap? Where you don't even get into orbit? Where you
are only weightless for five minutes? I'd pay $50 for that if it were at a
theme park... where it belongs.
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  #2  
Old September 20th 06, 09:59 PM posted to rec.sport.pro-wrestling,sci.space.policy,sci.space.shuttle,sci.space.station,sci.space.history
Brian Gaff
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Posts: 2,312
Default (Poll) Space Tourism

Yes, no point in going in a sub orbital flight. You can do a few seconds in
a plane and its a lot cheaper!

Brian

--
Brian Gaff -
Note:- In order to reduce spam, any email without 'Brian Gaff'
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"--" wrote in message
...
When it becomes available and reasonably priced do you plan on
becoming a Space Tourist?


That Virgin Galactic crap? Where you don't even get into orbit? Where
you
are only weightless for five minutes? I'd pay $50 for that if it were at
a
theme park... where it belongs.



  #3  
Old September 20th 06, 10:13 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.shuttle,sci.space.station,sci.space.history
Craig Fink
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Posts: 1,858
Default (Poll) Space Tourism

I don't think sub-orbital flights are the ultimate goal of Virgin
Galactic, more of a stepping stone to orbital tours. But I have to admit,
a ride in SpaceShipOne would definitely be an out of this world thrill.

http://www.scaled.com/projects/tiero...e-flight-1.wmv

I wonder if they're going to keep the victory roll as part of the flight?

--
Craig Fink
Courtesy E-Mail Welcome @
--

On Wed, 20 Sep 2006 20:59:49 +0000, Brian Gaff wrote:

Yes, no point in going in a sub orbital flight. You can do a few seconds in
a plane and its a lot cheaper!

Brian


  #4  
Old September 20th 06, 10:35 PM posted to rec.sport.pro-wrestling,sci.space.policy,sci.space.shuttle,sci.space.station,sci.space.history
David E. Powell
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Posts: 230
Default (Poll) Space Tourism


Brian Gaff wrote:
Yes, no point in going in a sub orbital flight. You can do a few seconds in
a plane and its a lot cheaper!

Brian


Do they still sell rides on Mig-25 "zoom climbs" in Russia? Those go up
pretty darn high (To where the sky is more blue than black, especially
at night) and even give some weightless time....

--
Brian Gaff -
Note:- In order to reduce spam, any email without 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name may be lost.
"--" wrote in message
...
When it becomes available and reasonably priced do you plan on
becoming a Space Tourist?


That Virgin Galactic crap? Where you don't even get into orbit? Where
you
are only weightless for five minutes? I'd pay $50 for that if it were at
a
theme park... where it belongs.


  #5  
Old September 20th 06, 10:36 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.shuttle,sci.space.station,sci.space.history
John Doe
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Posts: 1,134
Default (Poll) Space Tourism

-- wrote:
That Virgin Galactic crap? Where you don't even get into orbit? Where you
are only weightless for five minutes? I'd pay $50 for that if it were at a
theme park... where it belongs.



I wouldn't call it "crap". It is still an experience worth taking. It is
a thrill ride which I would classify along with bungee jumping or
parachuting or maybe like climbing the sydney harbour bridge. Not
something I would refuse to do.

However, it doesn't even come close to the experience in the Soyuz,
mostly because it lacks all the training, and living in Moscow for a
while, visiting Star City as well as Baikonur, meeting real astronauts,
doing all the pre-requisite exercises, and I assume the wilderness
survival tests (when landing on the Soyuz). Life aboard the soyuz may
not be pleasant in such close quarters, but it is definitely an
experience that you can learn from. May or may not be pleasant, but
definitely an experience. This is a not a thrill ride, it is a life
experience. The 10 days in space are just the icing on the cake when you
really think about it.

You come out of the Soyuz "ride" with skills, knowledge of russian,
experience in living in Russia for a while etc.

You come out of Virgin Galactic with memories of a great roller coaster
ride with just enough time to snap a few pictures.
  #6  
Old September 21st 06, 01:16 AM posted to rec.sport.pro-wrestling,sci.space.policy,sci.space.shuttle,sci.space.station,sci.space.history
Frank Glover[_1_]
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Posts: 353
Default (Poll) Space Tourism

Brian Gaff wrote:
Yes, no point in going in a sub orbital flight. You can do a few seconds in
a plane and its a lot cheaper!

Brian


It's also longer than 'a few seconds' and effectively 'in space.'
The best private companies can do. (and even the plane isn't *that* cheap)

For now. You must have patience (or $20 million USD), grasshopper...

(Someday, someone will likewise complain: "What's so special about
going around and around in low Earth orbit? Unless you can get me to the
Moon [Mars/Pluto/Alpha Centauri], it's crap!")


--

Frank

You know what to remove to reply...

Check out my web page: http://www.geocities.com/stardolphin1/link2.htm

"To confine our attention to terrestrial matters would be to limit the
human spirit."
- Stephen Hawking
  #7  
Old September 21st 06, 01:21 AM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.shuttle,sci.space.station,sci.space.history
Craig Fink
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Posts: 1,858
Default (Poll) Space Tourism

One of the things Anousheh Ansari wants to change in the world.

Me too.

--
Craig Fink
Courtesy E-Mail Welcome @
--

On Thu, 21 Sep 2006 00:16:18 +0000, Frank Glover wrote:

For now. You must have patience (or $20 million USD), grasshopper...


  #8  
Old September 21st 06, 01:28 AM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.shuttle,sci.space.station,sci.space.history
Frank Glover[_1_]
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Posts: 353
Default (Poll) Space Tourism

John Doe wrote:

-- wrote:

That Virgin Galactic crap? Where you don't even get into orbit? Where you
are only weightless for five minutes? I'd pay $50 for that if it were at a
theme park... where it belongs.




I wouldn't call it "crap". It is still an experience worth taking. It is
a thrill ride which I would classify along with bungee jumping or
parachuting or maybe like climbing the sydney harbour bridge. Not
something I would refuse to do.

However, it doesn't even come close to the experience in the Soyuz,
mostly because it lacks all the training, and living in Moscow for a
while, visiting Star City as well as Baikonur, meeting real astronauts,
doing all the pre-requisite exercises, and I assume the wilderness
survival tests (when landing on the Soyuz). Life aboard the soyuz may
not be pleasant in such close quarters, but it is definitely an
experience that you can learn from. May or may not be pleasant, but
definitely an experience. This is a not a thrill ride, it is a life
experience. The 10 days in space are just the icing on the cake when you
really think about it.

You come out of the Soyuz "ride" with skills, knowledge of russian,
experience in living in Russia for a while etc.

You come out of Virgin Galactic with memories of a great roller coaster
ride with just enough time to snap a few pictures.



Of course, anyone who can afford it, can tour Russia (or just learn
the language) anyway....

It's even possible to get the space training and *not* fly, for less
than $20 million. ('Spaecamps' have certainly been around for some time,
though few attending them seriously expects to get beyond the atmosphere.)

One does this to get into orbit. That we can currently get it for
$20 million US, and only through Russia, is purely coincidental to most
of us.

Suborbital is for the greater numbers of those of lesser means.

Purely zero-g flights, for those with still shallower pockets.

And heaven knows there *are* people who pay for 'roller coasters'

All (except roller coasters, which are already well within anyone's
means) will become cheaper with time.

What's wrong with a continuum of products/services, provided at a
continuum of prices? Is everyone here using the *most* expensive
computer available?

--

Frank

You know what to remove to reply...

Check out my web page: http://www.geocities.com/stardolphin1/link2.htm

"To confine our attention to terrestrial matters would be to limit the
human spirit."
- Stephen Hawking
  #9  
Old September 21st 06, 01:45 AM posted to rec.sport.pro-wrestling,sci.space.policy,sci.space.shuttle,sci.space.station,sci.space.history
Joe Strout
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Posts: 972
Default (Poll) Space Tourism

In article ,
"Brian Gaff" wrote:

Yes, no point in going in a sub orbital flight. You can do a few seconds in
a plane and its a lot cheaper!


And you get only a few seconds, and you don't get to see the Earth from
space. Not at all the same to me, as well as to many people who can
actually afford it at the moment (i.e. the ones whose opinions matter).
Fortunately, your opinion of it has very little to do with whether or
not it'll be a commercial success.
  #10  
Old September 21st 06, 04:34 AM posted to rec.sport.pro-wrestling,sci.space.policy,sci.space.shuttle,sci.space.station,sci.space.history
Henry Spencer
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Posts: 2,170
Default (Poll) Space Tourism

In article ,
Brian Gaff wrote:
Yes, no point in going in a sub orbital flight. You can do a few seconds in
a plane and its a lot cheaper!


Depends on what you want to do. Going into space isn't *just* a matter of
being in free fall, any more than climbing Everest is just a matter of
being cold, fatigued, and short of oxygen.

There are plenty of people who think suborbital flight is worthwhile
simply for the fact of having been in space -- that means above 100km, no
excuses accepted. Parabolic-flight aircraft don't deliver that. It's
like climbing Everest -- no simulation is the same as having really done
The Big One in person (and the long waiting list to climb Everest, despite
its dangers, reflects this).

Undoubtedly most people who'd like to go into space briefly would *prefer*
being able to go to orbit, but for the immediate future, that's vastly
more expensive and much less accessible. There's a serious market for
even the brief hops.
--
spsystems.net is temporarily off the air; | Henry Spencer
mail to henry at zoo.utoronto.ca instead. |
 




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